Essay

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Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences

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  • Selected Abstracts


    KNOWING WHEN TO FOLD 'EM: AN ESSAY ON EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF CEASEFIRE, COMPSTAT, AND EXILE,

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 3 2005
    RICHARD A. BERK
    [source]


    AN ARISTOTELIAN ACCOUNT OF VIRTUE ETHICS: AN ESSAY IN MORAL TAXONOMY

    PACIFIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2007
    SEAN MCALEER
    My account is Aristotelian because it avoids the excessive inclusivity of Martha Nussbaum's account and the deficient inclusivity of Gary Watson's account. I defend the account against the objection that Aristotle does not have a virtue ethics by its lights, and conclude with some remarks on moral taxonomy. [source]


    FICTIONAL FORM AND SYMPHONIC STRUCTURE: AN ESSAY IN COMPARATIVE AESTHETICS

    RATIO, Issue 4 2009
    Peter Kivy
    It is agreed on all hands that both fictional narratives and the familiar genres of classical music possess an inner structure that both can be perceived and be appreciated aesthetically. It is my argument here that this inner structure plays a crucially different role in fictional narrative than it does in classical music, confining myself here to ,absolute music' (which is to say, pure instrumental music without text, programme, dramatic setting, or other ,extra-musical' content). The argument, basically, is that whereas the sophisticated listener to the absolute music repertory is keenly, consciously aware of the inner structure, the sophisticated reader of fictional narrative, the principal exemplar being the novel, is not so aware. Therefore, whereas musical structure directly contributes to aesthetic satisfaction, narrative structure contributes only indirectly (which is not to deny that, at times, the reader is consciously aware of narrative structure, and that, at such times, it does contribute directly to aesthetic satisfaction). [source]


    FILM REVIEW ESSAY: FIGHT CLUB

    THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 5 2002
    Jeanne Wolff Bernstein
    First page of article [source]


    FILM REVIEW ESSAY: THE SIXTH SENSE

    THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOANALYSIS, Issue 2 2001
    Philip A. Ringstrom
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    FAITH IN A HARD GROUND: ESSAYS ON RELIGION, PHILOSOPHY AND ETHICS BY G.E.M. ANSCOMBE

    NEW BLACKFRIARS, Issue 1034 2010
    MICHAEL PAKALUK
    First page of article [source]


    THE MIND THAT IS CATHOLIC: PHILOSOPHICAL AND POLITICAL ESSAYS by James V. Schall

    NEW BLACKFRIARS, Issue 1028 2009
    DAVID EDWARD ROCKS OP
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The Triune God: An Essay in Postliberal Theology , By William C. Placher

    CONVERSATIONS IN RELIGION & THEOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
    David H. Kelsey
    First page of article [source]


    An Essay on the Role of Language in Collegiate Foreign Language Programmatic Reform,

    DIE UNTERRICHTSPRAXIS/TEACHING GERMAN, Issue 2 2009
    Hiram Maxim
    This position paper argues that collegiate foreign language (FL) education has lost sight of the central role that language plays in the profession. Regardless of one's sub-field within foreign language education (i.e., linguistic, literary, or cultural studies), the profession shares the common focus of exploring how to make and interpret meaning in and through language. The paper therefore recommends that an acknowledgement of and re-commitment to this foundational principle provides common ground to effect the types of change within departments that have long been called: the integration of upper- and lower-level instruction; the reform of graduate student teacher education to foster curricular thinking; the explicit and systematic attention to the development of advanced language abilities; and the establishment of a collaborative departmental culture centered around publicly shared beliefs and concerns. [source]


    Defining Economics: The Long Road to Acceptance of the Robbins Definition

    ECONOMICA, Issue 2009
    ROGER E. BACKHOUSE
    Robbins' Essay gave economics a definition that came to dominate the professional literature. This definition laid a foundation that could be seen as justifying both the narrowing of economic theory to the theory of constrained maximization or rational choice and economists' ventures into other social science fields. Though often presented as self-evidently correct, both the definition itself and the developments that it has been used to support were keenly contested. This paper traces the reception, diffusion and contesting of the Robbins definition, arguing that this process took around three decades and that even then there was still significant dissent. [source]


    The Heart of the Matter: An Essay about the Effects of Managed Care on Family Therapy with Children,

    FAMILY PROCESS, Issue 4 2001
    Ellen Pulleyblank Coffey Ph.d.
    This essay is based on a pilot study that examined the effects of managed care on the treatment of children and families, with special attention to community mental health. We embarked on the pilot study to test the accuracy and generalizability of our impression that family therapy and other systemic practices have been marginalized in ordinary clinics and agencies, and to understand the reasons why. We interviewed managed care providers, researchers, family therapy trainers, and clinicians in the Northeast. Our findings led to seven themes that support our impression that, even though there is a consensus about the need for coordinated family-based services, there is a disconnection between state policies, contractual requirements and what is actually occurring at the implementation level. This study suggests that our knowledge of human systems may be in danger of being disqualified and lost, with damaging consequences for the care of children. Yet, as systemic thinkers and practitioners, it is our belief that ethical and effective treatment need not be at odds with care that is cost-efficient. The direction of our future research will be to study whether the involvement of all stakeholders at all levels of planning and training leads to systemic family-based practices that consistently save costs and provide high-quality care. [source]


    Perspectives on Regional Change: A Review Essay on Handbook of Regional Growth and Development Theories

    GROWTH AND CHANGE, Issue 1 2010
    DEAN M. HANINK
    Handbook of Regional Growth and Development Theories, edited by Roberta Capello and Peter Nijkamp, Cheltenham, UK and Northampton MA, USA: Edward Elgar, 2009 (xi and 529 pp., 135, $250). ABSTRACT This paper reviews the contributions in The Handbook of Regional Growth and Development Theories, edited by Roberta Capello and Peter Nijkamp. The book's coverage is comprehensive in a conventional way. It emphasizes the significance of recent developments in theoretical and empirical regional analysis that have occurred in both neoclassical (convergence) and new economic geography (concentration) contexts. The role of knowledge spillovers in regional growth receives special attention. Given the recent advances in the field, and renewed interest in regional issues, it is time to expand the focus of analysis from relatively narrow production and distribution concerns, to broader ones that incorporate the effects of structural/sectoral, demographic, and environmental change on the future prospects of regional economies. Such an expansion would not only contribute to the theoretical richness of regional growth and development analysis, it would also do much to expand its utility in guiding public policy. [source]


    Asian Americans in the History of Education: An Historiographical Essay

    HISTORY OF EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2001
    Eileen H. Tamura
    First page of article [source]


    Perspectives and Challenges in Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    ADVANCED MATERIALS, Issue 32-33 2009
    Robert Langer
    This Essay provides a concise overview on the achievements and future challenges in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. [source]


    Methodological Nationalism, the Social Sciences, and the Study of Migration: An Essay in Historical Epistemology,

    INTERNATIONAL MIGRATION REVIEW, Issue 3 2003
    Andreas Wimmer
    The article examines methodological nationalism, a conceptual tendency that was central to the development of the social sciences and undermined more than a century of migration studies. Methodological nationalism is the naturalization of the global regime of nation-states by the social sciences. Transnational studies, we argue, including the study of transnational migration, is linked to periods of intense globalization such as the turn of the twenty-first century. Yet transnational studies have their own contradictions that may reintroduce methodological nationalism in other guises. In studying migration, the challenge is to avoid both extreme fluidism and the bounds of nationalist thought. [source]


    Individualism, an Essay on the Authority of the European Union , By A. Somek

    JCMS: JOURNAL OF COMMON MARKET STUDIES, Issue 2 2009
    MATEJ AVBELJ
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Elder Self-Neglect and the Justice System: An Essay from an Interdisciplinary Perspective

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 2008
    Marie-Therese Connolly JD
    Elder self-neglect is a complex issue for the legal system,one not always easily distinguished from other types of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation. The issue inherently implicates several disciplines, and although self-neglect is not prosecuted per se, prosecutions of other types of elder abuse, neglect, and exploitation may affect self-neglect as well. In addition, other types of legal intervention, such as guardianship actions, may serve to protect vulnerable older people, but it is critical to ensure that such interventions do not inappropriately infringe on the older person's civil liberties or result in exploitation or worse. There are daunting challenges to doing work in this field,death; ageism; medical, legal, and ethical complexities; and a chronic paucity of funding. It is nevertheless imperative that researchers expand their efforts to elucidate the nature and scope of elder self-neglect; its interplay with other forms of abuse, neglect, and exploitation; and the most effective mechanisms for intervention and prevention. Such efforts, and in particular interdisciplinary approaches to these common problems, are critical to improving care for the nation's older people and assisting millions of families and practitioners. [source]


    Art, the Ethical Self, and Political Eremitism: Fujiwara Seika's Essay on Landscape Painting

    JOURNAL OF CHINESE PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2004
    John Allen Tucker
    [source]


    Review Essay: Visual Communication and Social Advocacy

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION, Issue 1 2010
    Paul Messaris
    First page of article [source]


    Oprah Winfrey and the Glamour of Misery: An Essay on Popular Culture

    JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION, Issue 4 2005
    David W. Park
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    An Essay on the History and Future of Reliability from the Perspective of Replications

    JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT, Issue 4 2001
    Robert L. Brennan
    This article provides a review of some important milestones in the history of reliability, some current issues concerning reliability, and some likely prospects for reliability, from the perspective of one central question: "What constitutes a replication of a measurement procedure?" Special attention is given to the fixed/random aspects of facets that characterize replications. [source]


    Reconceptualizing Gender: A Review Essay

    JOURNAL OF FAMILY THEORY & REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
    Kristine M. Baber
    First page of article [source]


    Cruess Award Winner Essay: Why I Teach

    JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE EDUCATION, Issue 3 2010
    E. Allen Foegeding
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Cruess Award Winner Essay: Teaching and Learning , Learning and Teaching

    JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE EDUCATION, Issue 1 2009
    Stephanie Doores
    [source]


    The Radical Political Philosophy of Thomas Jefferson: An Essay in Retrieval

    MIDWEST STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY, Issue 1 2004
    RICHARD K. MATTHEWS
    First page of article [source]


    Some Animadversions upon the Essay of an Anonymous Author

    MILTON QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2007
    Michael Lieb
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Teskey's Delirious Milton: A Review Essay

    MILTON QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2007
    Marshall Grossman
    First page of article [source]


    Review Essay: The Divided Church and its Theology

    MODERN THEOLOGY, Issue 3 2000
    Bruce D. Marshall
    Book reviewed in this article: Ephraim Radner, The end of the Church: A Pneumatology of Christian Division in the West [source]


    Unresolved issues relating to the Shaking Palsy on the celebration of James Parkinson's 250th birthday

    MOVEMENT DISORDERS, Issue S17 2007
    Andrew J. Lees MD
    Abstract James Parkinson's Essay on the Shaking Palsy published in 1817 provided the first clear clinical description for the disorder now known throughout the world by his name. His primary reason for publishing his monograph shortly before his retirement from medical practice was to draw the medical profession's attention to a malady, which had not yet been defined as a nosological entity. He also hoped that the eminent anatomists of the day would be stimulated to elucidate the pathological lesion responsible for the clinical picture and that this in turn might lead to a rational cure. The concept of Parkinson's disease remains clinically based and successive generations of neurologists have refined and embellished Parkinson's seminal descriptions. Narrative accounts by affected individuals have also helped physicians understand what it is like to live with Parkinson's disease. For many years, the pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease were disputed and there were few clinico-pathological reports with adequate clinical description. However, most neurologists now link severe loss of nigral cells in the ventrolateral tier of the pars compacta of the substantia nigra with bradykinesia and the presence of Lewy bodies in a number of discrete brain stem and cortical regions with Parkinson's disease. There are many unanswered clinical questions relating to Parkinson's disease including the striking heterogeneity and frequent limb asymmetry. It also remains somewhat uncertain whether Parkinson's disease is ever truly unilateral by the time of clinical presentation and whether the hand rather than the foot is the most common site of onset. Hyposmia and visual hallucinations are helpful pointers in distinguishing Parkinson's disease from atypical Parkinsonism and should be specifically enquired about in the history. Simple reliable cultural-specific smell identification batteries are an urgent need and target of clinical research. It remains to be determined whether Alzheimer type dementia as opposed to a dysexecutive syndrome should be considered a part of Parkinson's disease and further detailed clinico-pathological correlative studies are needed. It is also unclear whether autosomal dominant monogenetic Parkinsonism due to synuclein or LRRK-2 mutations will prove to be identical clinically with Parkinson's disease and for the present it is wiser to regard Parkinson's disease as a sporadic disorder. Parkinson was an active political reformer and if alive today would certainly be campaigning to translate more effectively the rich seam of neuroscientific research of the last decade into therapeutic benefits for the rising number of people who are developing the shaking palsy as a result of increasing longevity in the developed world. 2007 Movement Disorder Society [source]


    Gender Ideology and Psychological Reality: An Essay on Cultural Reproduction

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 3 2002
    Kathleen Barlow
    Gender Ideology and Psychological Reality: An Essay on Cultural Reproduction. Melford E. Spiro. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1997. 220 pp. [source]