Education Courses (education + course)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Education Courses

  • continuing education course


  • Selected Abstracts


    Oral Health Education Courses for University Students: Why Not?

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2004
    Deok-Young Park PhD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Preparing for Motherhood: Authoritative Knowledge and the Undercurrents of Shared Experience in Two Childbirth Education Courses in Cagliari, Italy

    MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2000
    Suzanne K. Ketler
    This article compares the social settings and teaching organization of two differently structured childbirth education courses in Cagliari, Italy, in order to understand how social processes and contexts work to negotiate authoritative knowledge. Although the explicit goal of both courses was to transmit biomedical knowledge, knowledge based in women's experience nonetheless dominated some course sessions. Thus, I examine the social processes and interactions that enabled women's experiential knowledge to dominate discussions and subsequently share in the authority of biomedical knowledge in some situations. Because few existing studies do so, this article also addresses a gap in our current understanding by exploring not only how experiential knowledge comes to share authority with biomedical knowledge, but also, why it is important that it does. Focusing on the efficacy of differently structured courses, this article informs the planning of future childbirth education courses in similar settings, [childbirth education, authoritative knowledge, reproduction, prenatal care, Italy] [source]


    An updated history of the Teratology Society

    BIRTH DEFECTS RESEARCH, Issue 5 2010
    Thomas H. Shepard
    BACKGROUND: The 49-year history of the Teratology Society is reviewed. An abbreviated history is outlined in table form, with listings of the Warkany Lectures, the Continuing Education Courses, and officers of the society. The original article was updated to include the years 2000 to 2010. METHODS: A year-by-year description of the events is given, including the scientific and social content of the annual meetings and changes in the business of the society, in many cases using comments from the past presidents. The valuable and unique diversity of the members is discussed and illustrated, presenting the disciplines and main research areas of the presidents. The number of submitted abstracts and the various categories are tabulated, averaging the number and type over successive periods. A significant increase in the number of abstracts dealing with epidemiology and developmental biology is evident. The society's development is compared to that of a human, and the question was asked by Shephard et al. (2000): Have we reached the maturational stage of old age or senescence, or is the society still maturing gracefully? This question needs further discussion by all the members. By 2010, many positive changes are happening to revitalize the society. RESULTS: During the past 50 years, we have developed the scientific basis to prevent birth defects caused by rubella, alcoholism, and folate deficiency, as well as other prenatal exposures. We are now taking advantage of advances in many fields to begin shaping the Teratology Society of the 21st century. CONCLUSIONS: We must now engage in political battles to obtain the resources needed to conduct further research and to implement prevention programs, as well as to provide care and rehabilitation for persons with birth defects. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Strengthening the special educational needs element of initial teacher training and education

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPECIAL EDUCATION, Issue 4 2009
    Gill Golder
    In the academic year 2006,2007, the Training and Development Agency (TDA) set up a development programme to enable Initial Teacher Training and Education (ITTE) placements in specialist special education provision. The goal of the programme was to enhance the knowledge, skills and understanding of inclusive practice for special educational needs and disability among those joining and those who are relatively new to the teaching workforce. This article, by Gill Golder, Nicky Jones and Erica Eaton Quinn, all Senior Lecturers at the College of St Mark and St John in Plymouth, outlines one project related to this TDA programme. The authors explore the outcomes of their work on a three-year BEd (Honours) Secondary Physical Education course in the south-west against the TDA's objectives for both trainee teachers and the special schools to which they were attached. Results confirm the importance of preparing trainee teachers for a future career in more inclusive schools. [source]


    Knowledge of oral health professionals of treatment of avulsed teeth

    DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY, Issue 6 2006
    Nestor Cohenca
    Abstract,,, The management and immediate treatment of an avulsed permanent tooth will determine the long-term survival of the tooth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge of oral health professionals on the new guidelines for emergency treatment of avulsed teeth. A 12-item questionnaire was distributed among general dentists, specialists, dental hygienists and dental assistants attending Continuing Education courses at the School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, between 2003 and 2004. This study reports only on the general practitioners who comprised 83% of the participants. The results revealed an uneven pattern of knowledge among them regarding the emergency management of an avulsed tooth. Statistically significant associations were related to the participants' previous dental trauma education and their age. In conclusion, there is a need to improve the knowledge of general dentists in the current guidelines for emergency treatment of avulsed teeth. [source]


    Effectiveness of interventions to promote continuing professional development for dentists

    EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF DENTAL EDUCATION, Issue 4 2003
    Helen A Best
    Background:, Continuing education is incumbent upon dentists as health professionals, but its promotion may be required, particularly in order to ensure regular professional updating. Continuing professional development may be delivered in a variety of ways, and new strategies and techniques must be evaluated for effectiveness. Aim:, To evaluate the effectiveness of two interventions utilizing the philosophies and techniques of the discipline of Quality Improvement. Method:, A self-assessment instrument (a manual) for quality dental practice was developed using the Delphi technique. A randomized, controlled trial of the interventions was conducted under field conditions for dental practice in Victoria, Australia. Dentists in Test Groups 1 and 2 completed the self-assessment manual, and received relevant references and their own scores for the manual in comparison with empirical standards. Dentists in Test Group 1 also attended a continuing education course on Quality Improvement. Dentists in Control Group 1 completed the manual only and received feedback of their scores. Dentists in Test Groups 1 and 2, and in Control Group 1 completed the manual again after 1 year as a post-intervention follow-up. Dentists in Control Group 2 completed the manual only at 1 year. Results:, The intervention involving self-assessment, receipt of scores and references for the manual resulted in modest improvements in total scores for dentists after 1 year, although a response bias was apparent. Conclusion:, An effective method of facilitating change in quality dental practice was identified. Assessment of strategies and techniques for professional development of dentists should include observation of patterns of participation. [source]


    Can a long-term continuing education course in patient counselling promote a change in the practice of Finnish community pharmacists?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACY PRACTICE, Issue 3 2003
    Heli Kansanaho assistant in social pharmacy
    ABSTRACT Objective To assess community pharmacists' perceptions of the impact of a long-term continuing education (CE) course on their patient counselling skills. Methods Three focus groups were conducted with the course participants (n = 17) during the last module of the CE course. Data were analysed using computer software for qualitative analysis. Key findings The focus groups revealed eight preliminary categories that were further categorised into four themes related to the learning process in patient counselling skills. The first theme related to achieving the learning objectives. The second related to personal development, understanding principles of two-way communication, and problems in their implementation in practice. The third theme related to actions taken by the participants in their work place, and the fourth involved the potential conflict between the new skills gained and the traditional communication culture in the participant's pharmacy. Conclusion The CE course provided the community pharmacists with new skills and knowledge in patient counselling and collective in-house training. The findings show that the greatest challenge is to change the communication culture of the pharmacy. To achieve this, it may be necessary for more than one pharmacist from the same pharmacy to participate in the training process at the same time. [source]


    Implementing a CMC tutor group for an existing distance education course

    JOURNAL OF COMPUTER ASSISTED LEARNING, Issue 3 2000
    M Weller
    Abstract, ,Artificial Intelligence for Technology' (T396) is a distance learning course provided by the Open University of the UK using face-to-face tutorials. In 1997 a pilot study was undertaken of a computer-mediated communication (CMC) tutor group which consisted of volunteers from around the UK. The student feedback raised a number of issues including: the need for a distinct function for the tutor group conference, the role of and demands on the tutor, and the benefits perceived by students. It is suggested that some issues arise from a conflict of cultures each with their own implicit assumptions. The traditional face-to-face tutorial model is sometimes at variance with the demands of the new CMC based tuition. [source]


    Oral Cancer Knowledge and Opinions Among Maryland Nurse Practitioners

    JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 3 2001
    Piya Siriphant DDS
    Abstract Objectives: As part of a Maryland statewide oral cancer needs assessment, a census of adult and family practice nurse practitioners was conducted to determine their knowledge of oral cancer risk factors, diagnostic procedures and related opinions. Methods: Information was obtained through a pretested, 40-item, self-administered mail questionnaire of 389 nurse practitioners. A second complete mailing was sent three weeks after the initial mailing; two postal card reminders were mailed at 10 and 17 days after the second mailing, which yielded a response rate of 56 percent. Results: Most nurse practitioners identified the use of tobacco, alcohol, and prior oral cancer lesions as real risk factors. But only 35 percent identified exposure to the sun as a risk for lip cancer. Respondents were not overly knowledgeable about the early signs of oral cancer, most common forms, or sites for oral cancer. Only 19 percent believed their knowledge of oral cancer was current. Nurse practitioners who reported having a continuing education course on oral cancer within the past two to five years were 3.1 times more likely to have a high score on knowledge of risk factors and 2.9 times more likely to have a high score on knowledge of both risk factors and of diagnostic procedures than were those who had never had a continuing education course. Conclusions: The reported knowledge of oral cancer, in conjunction with opinions about level of knowledge and training, point to a need for systematic educational updates in oral cancer prevention and early detection. [source]


    Evaluation of a family-oriented continuing medical education course for general practitioners

    MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 3 2002
    Anja Taanila
    Objective To explore the long-term effects of a 2-year Family Systems Medicine course. Fifteen experienced GPs participated in the training programme. Setting Continuing Education Centre, University of Tampere, Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, Finland. Methods The participants assessed the development of their professional skills on the Doherty-Baird scale and filled in 2 questionnaires. The material obtained from the application form and 2 questionnaires was analysed using the grounded theory method. Results The reasons for taking part in the course seemed to be the constant increase in the workload, problems caused by the demands for change and adaptation, stress and exhaustion. Furthermore, 10 health centres out of 15 had adopted the population-based practice, which requires different working methods compared to the old routines. Some trainees reported that their family-centred working methods improved during the course. A year after the end of the training, all of the GPs who had participated were using such methods in their daily practice. Half of the participants felt that they had also improved the functioning of their working group by making it more family-oriented. The significance of multiprofessional collaboration was one of the most important insights during the course. Conclusion The 2-year family-oriented training programme provided GPs with systemic thinking and with new skills, including the ability to work with families. The programme raised awareness of the need for multiprofessional collaboration in the primary care sittings. [source]


    Critical media literacy and popular film: Experiences of teaching and learning in a graduate class

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR ADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION, Issue 115 2007
    Heather Stuckey
    This chapter describes the use of popular film and semiotics for the development of critical media literacy in a graduate-level education course. [source]


    Enhancing adult learning through interdisciplinary studies

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR ADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION, Issue 103 2004
    Daphne W. Ntiri
    This examination of the pedagogical and curricular characteristics and imperatives of an interdisciplinary studies program for adult learners, within a wider context of theory and practice, draws on the example of a general education course to demonstrate the vitality between interdisciplinary thinking and adult learning. [source]


    Changes in Caregiving Satisfaction and Information Needs Among Relatives of Adults With Mental Illness: Results of a Randomized Evaluation of a Family-Led Education Intervention

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 4 2006
    Susan A. Pickett-Schenk PhD
    The authors examined changes in caregiving satisfaction and information needs among 462 relatives of individuals with mental illness who participated in a study of a family-led education course, the Journey of Hope (JOH). Participants were randomly assigned to receive JOH or to a control group waiting list and followed for 9 months. General linear model repeated measures analysis of variance found that, compared with the control group, the intervention group showed significant improvement in caregiving satisfaction and information needs following course completion and maintained these gains for another 6 months. Education and support from other family members in the form of a structured course is effective in meeting the caregiving needs of relatives of persons with mental illness. [source]


    Knowledge to action: Scholarship for faculty and staff

    THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS, Issue 1 2009
    FAAPArticle first published online: 13 MAR 200, FRCPC, Savithiri Ratnapalan MBBS
    Abstract Introduction: This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of a continuing education course in facilitating the development and implementation of educational projects of course participants. Methods: This is a case study evaluating a full-year course that consisted of 11 monthly seminars, each 4 hours in length, including practice in a computer laboratory. The class size was limited to 12 participants. Needs-assessment surveys at the beginning of the course, student evaluations, and midterm and final progress reports were analyzed. Results: Seven staff physicians, 3 clinical fellows, a nurse educator, and a research assistant enrolled in the course. Initial needs-assessment surveys indicated that most people had adequate computer skills,11 (90%),but only 2 (17%) were able to type well, 11 (90%) had no statistical knowledge, and 10 (83%) had limited literature-searching skills. The mean score on speaker evaluations for lectures was 4.5 on a scoring scheme of 1,5 where 1 was poor and 5 was outstanding. Ten participants (83%) had a complete proposal for an educational project written by midterm. Nine participants applied for external grants and 2 of them received external funding for their projects. Five participants (42%) completed a publishable educational project by the end of the 11-month course, and submitted it for presentation at scientific meetings. Discussion: Like many adults, health care professionals experience limited time for involvement in formal education. This study shows that a limited-time-commitment course could facilitate health care professionals to develop and successfully implement educational projects translating ideas into action. [source]


    Comprehensive evaluation of an online tobacco control continuing education course in Canada

    THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS, Issue 4 2008
    Kirsten E. Sears MHSc
    Abstract Introduction: To respond to the increasing need to build capacity for planning, implementing, and supporting tobacco control strategies, an evidence-based, online continuing education (CE) course aimed at Canadian public health professionals was developed. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the course, Tobacco and Public Health: From Theory to Practice (http://tobaccocourse.otru.org). Methods: Rossett and McDonald's revision of Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model for training programs guided the evaluation design. A pre-, post-, and follow-up single group design assessed immediate reactions to course modules, knowledge change and retention, practice change, and overall perceived value of the course. Six external peer reviewers evaluated course module content. Results: Fifty-nine participants completed all three course modules and the final online questionnaire at time 3, representing a response rate of 78%. Significant knowledge gains occurred between times 1 and 2 (p < 0.001). Although time 3 scores remained higher than time 1 scores for each module (p < 0.001), they decreased significantly between times 2 and 3 (p < 0.001). The majority of participants (93%) felt the topics covered were useful to their daily work. All but one participant felt the course was a good investment of their time, and nearly all participants (97%) stated they would recommend the course to others. Peer reviewers found that module content flowed well and was comprehensive. Discussion: This comprehensive evaluation was valuable both for assessing whether course goals were achieved and for identifying areas for course improvement. We expect this design would be a useful model to evaluate other online continuing education courses. [source]


    Impact of a short, culturally relevant training course on cancer knowledge and confidence in Western Australia's Aboriginal Health Professionals

    AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 2010
    Emma J. Croager
    Abstract Objective: To develop, deliver and evaluate a cancer education course for Indigenous Health Professionals. Method: The cancer education course combines expert presentations, interactive sessions and visits to local cancer treatment centres. Three four-day courses have been run, in both metropolitan and regional Western Australia (WA). Cancer knowledge and confidence were measured at baseline, course completion and at follow-up (six to eight months). Data were analysed within subject. Results: Thirty-five Aboriginal Health Professionals have completed the program, most from rural or remote WA. All confidence items significantly improved at course completion (p<0.005), but improvements for only two items, ,I know what cancer is' and ,I can describe the different common cancers', were sustained at follow-up (p<0.05). Knowledge of treatment (p<0.05), screening (p<0.05) and the most common cancers in women (p<0.005) were significantly greater after course completion, but increased knowledge was not sustained at follow-up. Conclusion: Demand for places suggests that Aboriginal Health Professionals are interested in developing knowledge, skills and confidence in cancer control. Attendance increased understanding of cancer and improved cancer knowledge however this was not maintained. Implications: A short, culturally relevant training course increases cancer knowledge and confidence, however, ongoing education is needed to maintain this. [source]


    Hypervideo application on an experimental control system as an approach to education

    COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION, Issue 1 2008
    Debevc, Matja
    Abstract Hypervideo, as an interactive tool with links within video frames, is becoming widely used in multimedia presentations for e-learning applications. Its concept of rich multimedia presentation together with temporal based link objects, gives a chance for use in engineering education courses, where many practical work and experiments are needed. In the article we present a strategy for the development and navigation of hypervideo application, to be used in engineering education. Example of magnetic suspension system experiment was built as hypervideo application. The system usability was tested with two methods, software usability measurement inventory (SUMI) evaluation and general approach to usability engineering. Test results have shown that hypervideo increases the users' motivation to work and helps students recognize, organize and present specific information. By applying some of the proposed improvements in future development, hypervideo could be a significant tool in the future of engineering education. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Comput Appl Eng Educ 16: 31,44, 2008; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com); DOI 10.1002/cae.20116 [source]


    Hub-and-spoke model for a 5-day structured patient education programme for people with Type 1 diabetes

    DIABETIC MEDICINE, Issue 9 2009
    H. Rogers
    Abstract Aims, Structured education programmes for people with Type 1 diabetes can deliver improved diabetes control (including reduced severe hypoglycaemia) and quality of life. They can be cost-effective but are resource intensive. We tested the ability to deliver an evidence-based 5-day programme in diabetes centres too small to deliver the courses. Methods, Specialist medical and nursing staff from three district general hospital diabetes services (the ,spokes') were trained in all aspects of the education programme, except those directly related to course delivery, by a larger centre (the ,hub'). The hub staff delivered the 5-day patient education courses, but all other patient education and management was managed locally. Diabetes control and quality of life were assessed at 1 year post-course. Results, In 63 patients with follow-up data, glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) fell by 0.42 1.0% (P = 0.001), with a greater fall in those with high HbA1c at baseline, and no mean weight gain. Emergency call-out for severe hypoglycaemia fell from 10 episodes in seven patients the year before to one episode in one patient (P = 0.03). Quality-of-life measures improved, with reduced negative impact of diabetes on diabetes-related quality of life (P < 0.00004) and ,present quality of life' improving (P < 0.001). Conclusions, The benefits of a 5-day structured education programme can be provided to patients with Type 1 diabetes attending centres without the resources to provide the teaching course itself, by a ,hub-and-spoke' methodology. [source]


    Advancing Gender Equality: The Role of Women-Only Trade Union Education

    GENDER, WORK & ORGANISATION, Issue 1 2002
    Anne-Marie Greene
    The need to improve the level of membership and the number of women activists has been a central feature of overall ,renewal' strategies of many British trade unions. Within this, equality education has been a key part of policy-making. This research draws on detailed case studies of two trade unions and focuses on their women-only education courses. We suggest that a greater understanding of the contribution of different types of trade union education to the advance of equality is a key factor in the ability of unions to maintain a central role at workplace level, within the context of an increasingly diverse labour market. [source]


    Political Partisanship, Voting Abstention and Higher Education: Changing Preferences in a British Youth Cohort in the 1990s

    HIGHER EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2002
    Muriel EgertonArticle first published online: 16 DEC 200
    This paper focuses on the relationship between education and political partisanship, using the British Household Panel Study (1991,1999). It is known that partisanship has been falling in Britain since the mid,1950s. However, voting abstention rose only gradually until the June 2001 election where the turnout (at 59 per cent) was the lowest since 1918. Partisanship also fell sharply during the 1990s. Although social class and education are associated with turnout in the USA, no relationship has been reported in the UK, and voting seems to have been perceived as a citizen duty. However, in the light of recent changes in voting patterns and educational participation, this paper investigates the role of education, contextualising education effects in social class and gender effects. The preferences of young people are observed in their late teens, before entering the labour market or higher education, and are compared with those of the same young people in their early 20s, after completing higher education courses or gaining labour market experience. The BHPS yielded a sample of about 500 young people with the required data over the time period. It was hypothesised that dissatisfaction with government performance would take different forms for the more and the less educated, with the more educated shifting preferences to minority parties while the less educated shift preferences to voting abstention. The hypothesis was confirmed for young men. Endorsement of abstention was very high for adolescent women who also seemed to be more influenced by their family's social class. However, by early adulthood a lower proportion of young women endorsed abstention than young men. Strong effects of education were still found with more highly educated young women (as with more highly educated young men) being more likely to have party preferences. [source]


    Questionnaire survey on the use of rotary nickel,titanium endodontic instruments by Australian dentists

    INTERNATIONAL ENDODONTIC JOURNAL, Issue 4 2004
    P. Parashos
    Abstract Aim, To ascertain the extent of the adoption and use of rotary nickel,titanium (NiTi) instruments and techniques in general dental practice and specialist endodontic practice in Australia in 2001. Methodology, A questionnaire survey comprising 43 questions was developed by first creating questions, then pilot testing with 10 postgraduate students in endodontics, followed by a final revision. The final series of questions covered demographics, patterns of rotary NiTi usage, issues associated with NiTi usage and training in NiTi use. The sampling frame was 908, comprising 64 endodontists and 844 general dentists. Results, The overall response rate was 87%. Rotary NiTi instruments were used by 22% of general dentists and 64% of endodontists. The two main reasons for not using rotary NiTi were ,no perceived advantage' and ,too fragile'. Instrument fracture had been experienced by 74% of respondents, and 72% of these had fractured one to five files for the two main perceived reasons of ,excessive pressure on the file' and ,over-usage'. The next two most common problems encountered were ,binding' (53%) and ,ledging' (45%). Very high proportions of positive experiences were noted. Most respondents (73%) had attended one or more continuing education courses, most of which were provided by dental supply companies (64%). Conclusions, The results indicate a sensible and responsible approach to the incorporation of rotary NiTi instruments and techniques into root canal treatment. Dentists were aware of the limitations of the new technology, but were taking steps to become familiar with the properties and behaviour of the instruments. Instrument fracture was common, but it was of low frequency and did not deter dentists from using the technology. [source]


    Going Dutch: The Development of Collaborative Practices Between Higher Education and Museums and Galleries

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 1 2003
    Liz Smith
    This study reports on a very successful collaboration between teacher education courses in Manchester and Amsterdam and the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. The central aim of the initiative was to promote and sustain partnerships between Higher Education (HE) institutions, public galleries and schools with a view to developing, delivering and sharing good practice in art and design within a European context. [source]


    A study into dentists' knowledge of the treatment of traumatic injuries to young permanent incisors

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRIC DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2005
    M. N. KOSTOPOULOU
    Summary. Objective., The aims of this study were to evaluate dentists' knowledge of the emergency treatment of traumatic injuries to young permanent incisors, and to investigate barriers to treatment. Design., A closed-ended questionnaire was sent to 1023 general dental practitioners (GDPs) and community dental officers (CDOs) in West/North Yorkshire and Humberside, UK. Methods., The questionnaire comprised 17 questions. Six questions asked for general information about the participants (i.e. profession, age, gender, year of graduation, training or education on dental trauma, and willingness to provide emergency care), 10 were relevant to the emergency treatment of crown fractures, root fractures, luxation and avulsion injuries, and the last question queried any perceived barriers to treatment. Results., Seven hundred and twenty-four questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 71%, and these indicated that dentists' knowledge of the emergency treatment of dentoalveolar trauma in children was inadequate. The CDOs were significantly more knowledgeable than the GDPs, as were younger and more recently graduated dentists compared with older ones. The GDPs regarded the difficulty of treating children and the inadequate fees of the UK National Health Service as important barriers to treatment. Dentists who attended continuing dental education courses on dental traumatology had a more thorough knowledge than those who did not. Conclusion., Overall, the dentists' knowledge of the emergency treatment of dentoalveolar trauma in children was inadequate. Greater emphasis on undergraduate and postgraduate education in this area is indicated. [source]


    Preservice elementary teachers' views of their students' prior knowledge of science

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 4 2008
    Valerie K. Otero
    Abstract Pre-service teachers face many challenges as they learn to teach in ways that are different from their own educational experiences. Pre-service teachers often enter teacher education courses with pre-conceptions about teaching and learning that may or may not be consistent with contemporary learning theory. To build on preservice teachers' prior knowledge, we need to identify the types of views they have when entering teacher education courses and the views they develop throughout these courses. The study reported here focuses specifically on preservice teachers' views of their own students' prior knowledge and the implications these views have on their understanding of the formative assessment process. Sixty-one preservice teachers were studied from three sections of a science methods course. Results indicate that preservice teachers exhibited a limited number of views about students' prior knowledge. These views tended to privilege either academic or experience-based concepts for different aspects of formative assessment, in contrast to contemporary perspectives on teaching for understanding. Rather than considering these views as misconceptions, it is argued that it is more useful to consider them as resources for further development of a more flexible concept of formative assessment. Four common views are discussed in detail and applied to science teacher education. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 45: 497,523, 2008 [source]


    Overview and Summary: School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006

    JOURNAL OF SCHOOL HEALTH, Issue 8 2007
    Laura Kann PhD
    ABSTRACT Background:, The School Health Policies and Programs Study (SHPPS) 2006 is the largest, most comprehensive assessment of school health programs in the United States ever conducted. Methods:, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention conducts SHPPS every 6 years. In 2006, computer-assisted telephone interviews or self-administered mail questionnaires were completed by state education agency personnel in all 50 states plus the District of Columbia and among a nationally representative sample of districts (n = 538). Computer-assisted personal interviews were conducted with personnel in a nationally representative sample of elementary, middle, and high schools (n = 1103) and with a nationally representative sample of teachers of classes covering required health instruction in elementary schools and required health education courses in middle and high schools (n = 912) and teachers of required physical education classes and courses (n = 1194). Results:, SHPPS 2006 describes key school health policies and programs across all 8 school health program components: health education, physical education and activity, health services, mental health and social services, nutrition services, healthy and safe school environment, faculty and staff health promotion, and family and community involvement. SHPPS 2006 also provides data to monitor 6 Healthy People 2010 objectives. Conclusions:, SHPPS 2006 is a new and important resource for school and public health practitioners, scientists, advocates, policymakers, and all those who care about the health and safety of youth and their ability to succeed academically and socially. [source]


    Preparing for Motherhood: Authoritative Knowledge and the Undercurrents of Shared Experience in Two Childbirth Education Courses in Cagliari, Italy

    MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2000
    Suzanne K. Ketler
    This article compares the social settings and teaching organization of two differently structured childbirth education courses in Cagliari, Italy, in order to understand how social processes and contexts work to negotiate authoritative knowledge. Although the explicit goal of both courses was to transmit biomedical knowledge, knowledge based in women's experience nonetheless dominated some course sessions. Thus, I examine the social processes and interactions that enabled women's experiential knowledge to dominate discussions and subsequently share in the authority of biomedical knowledge in some situations. Because few existing studies do so, this article also addresses a gap in our current understanding by exploring not only how experiential knowledge comes to share authority with biomedical knowledge, but also, why it is important that it does. Focusing on the efficacy of differently structured courses, this article informs the planning of future childbirth education courses in similar settings, [childbirth education, authoritative knowledge, reproduction, prenatal care, Italy] [source]


    Multicultural teaching and learning resources for preparing future faculty in teaching in higher education courses

    NEW DIRECTIONS FOR TEACHING & LEARNING, Issue 111 2007
    Ilene D. (Ida) Alexander
    The author provides a review of readings from which future faculty might explore and begin to shape a multicultural approach to teaching and learning. [source]


    Comprehensive evaluation of an online tobacco control continuing education course in Canada

    THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS, Issue 4 2008
    Kirsten E. Sears MHSc
    Abstract Introduction: To respond to the increasing need to build capacity for planning, implementing, and supporting tobacco control strategies, an evidence-based, online continuing education (CE) course aimed at Canadian public health professionals was developed. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the course, Tobacco and Public Health: From Theory to Practice (http://tobaccocourse.otru.org). Methods: Rossett and McDonald's revision of Kirkpatrick's four-level evaluation model for training programs guided the evaluation design. A pre-, post-, and follow-up single group design assessed immediate reactions to course modules, knowledge change and retention, practice change, and overall perceived value of the course. Six external peer reviewers evaluated course module content. Results: Fifty-nine participants completed all three course modules and the final online questionnaire at time 3, representing a response rate of 78%. Significant knowledge gains occurred between times 1 and 2 (p < 0.001). Although time 3 scores remained higher than time 1 scores for each module (p < 0.001), they decreased significantly between times 2 and 3 (p < 0.001). The majority of participants (93%) felt the topics covered were useful to their daily work. All but one participant felt the course was a good investment of their time, and nearly all participants (97%) stated they would recommend the course to others. Peer reviewers found that module content flowed well and was comprehensive. Discussion: This comprehensive evaluation was valuable both for assessing whether course goals were achieved and for identifying areas for course improvement. We expect this design would be a useful model to evaluate other online continuing education courses. [source]


    Motivators and Inhibitors for University Faculty in Distance and e-learning

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
    Ruth Gannon Cook
    This article reports on four United States studies of how rewards systems, extrinsic and intrinsic, could play an important role in providing incentives for university faculty to teach (or remain teaching) electronic and distance education courses. The first three studies conducted prior to 2003 reported faculty were inherently motivated to teach e-learning and distance education. The fourth study in 2003 reported key findings that differed from the earlier studies. Using a principal components analysis, the researchers found nine indicators of motivation to participate or not participate in electronic or distance education. The implications from the fourth study indicated that, while faculty members were inherently committed to helping students, faculty members wanted their basic physiological needs met by university administration through extrinsic motivators, such as salary increases and course releases. [source]


    TEACHER EDUCATION: Reflections upon teacher education in severe difficulties in the USA: shared concerns about quantity and quality

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPECIAL EDUCATION, Issue 2 2009
    Phyllis Jones
    In this article, Phyllis Jones of the Department of Special Education at the University of South Florida and Elizabeth West from the University of Washington explore key issues in respect to teacher education for teachers who teach pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties in the USA. Issues relating to quantity and quality of teachers are discussed in the context of policy and practice in the USA. Reflections related to teacher education delivery in the USA, in terms of case-based learning and distance education, for example, and the content of teacher education courses, for example, in terms of helping teachers to understand the needs of pupils with learning difficulties and the promotion of evidence-based practices, are discussed. Phyllis Jones and Elizabeth West suggest that their reflections can contribute to continuing discussions about teacher education in the UK for teachers who work with pupils with severe and profound learning difficulties. [source]