Euthymic Patients (euthymic + patient)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Emotional vulnerability and cognitive control in patients with bipolar disorder and their healthy siblings: a pilot study

ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, Issue 2 2010
Kathrin Houshmand
Scheuch K, Bräunig P, Gauggel S, Kliesow K, Sarkar R, Krüger S. Emotional vulnerability and cognitive control in patients with bipolar disorder and their healthy siblings: a pilot study. Objective: There is evidence that, even in remission, patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have deficits in cognitive function and emotional regulation. Siblings of patients with BD are also reported to exhibit minor dysfunction in neuropsychological domains. In this study, we examined the interference of acute mood state with reaction time (RT) and response inhibition in euthymic patients with BD, in their healthy siblings and in healthy controls. Methods: A total of 34 patients with bipolar I disorder, 22 healthy siblings and 33 healthy controls performed a stop-signal paradigm after induction of a transient intense sadness and a relaxed mood state. The differences in RT and the response inhibition were compared between the groups. Results: Euthymic patients with BD displayed a higher emotional reactivity compared with their siblings and with controls. Compared with controls, patients with BD showed longer RTs in a relaxed mood state and a delay in response inhibition during emotional activation. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence for the clinical observation that patients with BD have shorter RTs when in a state of emotional arousal rather than in a relaxed state. Inhibitory deficits in these patients may be because of a too strong emotional arousal. The results show that in patients with BD, relaxation and emotional arousal are inversely associated with performance in a neuropsychological task. This is in contrast to findings in healthy individuals suggesting a dysbalance in emotional regulation in these patients. [source]


Increased right amygdala volume in lithium-treated patients with bipolar I disorder

ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2010
J. Usher
Usher J, Menzel P, Schneider-Axmann T, Kemmer C, Reith W, Falkai P, Gruber O, Scherk H. Increased right amygdala volume in lithium-treated patients with bipolar I disorder. Objective:, The amygdala plays a major role in processing emotional stimuli. Fourteen studies using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have examined the amygdala volume in paediatric and adult patients with bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy controls (HC) and reported inconsistent findings. Lithium has been found to increase grey matter volume, and first evidence points towards an effect on regional brain volume such as the amygdala. Method:, We examined the amygdala volume of euthymic patients with BD treated with lithium (n = 15), without lithium (n = 24) and HC (n = 41) using structural MRI. Results:, Patients treated with lithium exhibited in comparison to HC a larger right absolute (+17.9%, P = 0.015) and relative (+18%, P = 0.017) amygdala volume. There was no significant difference in amygdala volume between patients without lithium treatment and HC. Conclusion:, Lithium appears to have a sustained effect on a central core region of emotional processing and should therefore be considered in studies examining BD. [source]


White matter lesions in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder

ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 6 2009
A. J. Lloyd
Objective:, We aimed to quantify both load and regional distributions of hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in prospectively verified euthymic bipolar patients and matched controls. Method:, Cerebral hyperintensities on T2, proton density and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI were compared between 48 bipolar and 47 control subjects using semi-quantitative rating scales. Results:, Bipolar subjects had more severe frontal deep white matter lesions (DWML). Hyperintensity load was independent of age in bipolar patients but increased with age in controls. Global prevalence and severity of hyperintensities did not differ between groups. Exploratory analysis showed DWML in excess in the left hemisphere in bipolar subjects but not in controls. Conclusion:, Findings are consistent with clinical, particularly some neurocognitive, features of bipolar disorder and implicate fronto-subcortical circuits in its neurobiology. They more probably reflect a trait abnormality or illness scar rather than a mood state-dependent finding. Processes other than ageing and vascular factors may underlie their development. [source]


Neurocognitive functions in euthymic bipolar patients

ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 5 2009
K. Jamrozinski
Objective:, Meta-analytic findings support the hypothesis of specific neurocognitive deficits for bipolar patients in the domains of attention, processing speed, memory and executive functions. This study aims to show neurocognitive impairment in euthymic patients with bipolar I disorder compared with healthy controls while detailing the impact of medication side-effects or illness characteristics on neuropsychological test performance. Method:, Forty euthymic patients with bipolar I disorder were compared with 40 healthy controls in a cross-sectional design. Clinical features and neuropsychological measures of IQ, psychomotor speed, verbal fluency, learning and memory, executive functions and attention were assessed. Results:, Patients without antipsychotic drug use did not differ significantly from healthy controls in any neuropsychological measure. Yet patients treated with antipsychotics showed significant underperformance in the domains of semantic fluency, verbal learning and recognition memory as well as executive functions related to planning abilities, even when clinical features were controlled for. Conclusion:, The impact of antipsychotic medication needs to be further clarified for euthymic bipolar patients and should be considered when neuropsychological test performance is interpreted. [source]


Effects of recurrence on the cognitive performance of patients with bipolar I disorder: implications for relapse prevention and treatment adherence

BIPOLAR DISORDERS, Issue 5 2010
Carlos López-Jaramillo
López-Jaramillo C, Lopera-Vásquez J, Gallo A, Ospina-Duque J, Bell V, Torrent C, Martínez-Arán A, Vieta E. Effects of recurrence on the cognitive performance of patients with bipolar I disorder: implications for relapse prevention and treatment adherence. Bipolar Disord 2010: 12: 557,567. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objective:, To determine if the repeated occurrence of manic episodes in bipolar I disorder (BD-I) patients is associated with reduced cognitive performance, which could in turn imply a worsening in the disorder's evolution. Method:, Cognitive performance in euthymic patients was assessed using attention, memory, and executive function tests on 24 BD-I patients who had experienced only 1 manic episode, on 27 BD-I patients with 2 manic episodes, on 47 BD-I patients with 3 or more manic episodes, and on 66 healthy control subjects. Results:, In BD-I patients, number of manic episodes was positively associated with poorer performance on neurocognitive tests, an association that was not accounted for by depression, disease chronicity, onset, or medication. Significant differences in attention and executive function were found between patients and controls and in those patients who had had just 1 manic episode compared to those who had 3 or more. Conclusion:, The number of manic episodes predicted poor cognitive performance, suggesting that the recurrence of mania may have a long-term neuropsychological impact. Prospective follow-up studies need to be completed to explore this effect further as better treatment adherence may have a protective effect on neurocognitive function. [source]


Higher striatal dopamine transporters in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder: a SPECT study with [99mTc] TRODAT-1

BIPOLAR DISORDERS, Issue 1 2010
Ting Ting Chang
Chang TT, Yeh TL, Chiu NT, Chen PS, Huang HY, Yang YK, Lee IH, Lu RB. Higher striatal dopamine transporters in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder: a SPECT study with [99mTc] TRODAT-1. Bipolar Disord 2010: 12: 102,106. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Objectives:, Dopamine has been implicated in the etiology of bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to explore striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in euthymic bipolar patients. Methods:, Seventeen drug-free euthymic bipolar patients were recruited. The availability of DAT was approximated using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with [99mTc] TRODAT-1. Results:, Compared to the controls, the euthymic bipolar patients had significantly higher availability of striatal DAT. Conclusions:, Even for patients in the euthymic state, the DAT availability is still higher than that of the controls. [source]


Verbal memory in mania: effects of clinical state and task requirements

BIPOLAR DISORDERS, Issue 5 2003
David E Fleck
Objectives: Manic patients exhibit impaired verbal learning and memory, particularly following longstanding illness. However, it is unclear whether recognition and recall performance are differentially influenced by a manic mood state. Methods: To examine this issue, we administered the California Verbal Learning Test and symptom-rating scales to inpatients with pure or mixed mania, euthymic outpatients, and healthy comparison subjects. Results: An overall performance difference was identified between groups. Manic and euthymic patients performed more poorly than healthy subjects on recall. However, manic patients performed more poorly than euthymic patients and healthy subjects on recognition. Conclusions: These results suggest that verbal retrieval deficits are stable vulnerability indicators in bipolar disorder, whereas verbal encoding deficits are manic episode indicators. The known subcortical dysfunction in this disorder may produce stable retrieval deficits while acute mood symptoms attenuate encoding during affective episodes only. [source]


Emotional vulnerability and cognitive control in patients with bipolar disorder and their healthy siblings: a pilot study

ACTA NEUROPSYCHIATRICA, Issue 2 2010
Kathrin Houshmand
Scheuch K, Bräunig P, Gauggel S, Kliesow K, Sarkar R, Krüger S. Emotional vulnerability and cognitive control in patients with bipolar disorder and their healthy siblings: a pilot study. Objective: There is evidence that, even in remission, patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have deficits in cognitive function and emotional regulation. Siblings of patients with BD are also reported to exhibit minor dysfunction in neuropsychological domains. In this study, we examined the interference of acute mood state with reaction time (RT) and response inhibition in euthymic patients with BD, in their healthy siblings and in healthy controls. Methods: A total of 34 patients with bipolar I disorder, 22 healthy siblings and 33 healthy controls performed a stop-signal paradigm after induction of a transient intense sadness and a relaxed mood state. The differences in RT and the response inhibition were compared between the groups. Results: Euthymic patients with BD displayed a higher emotional reactivity compared with their siblings and with controls. Compared with controls, patients with BD showed longer RTs in a relaxed mood state and a delay in response inhibition during emotional activation. Conclusions: The present study provides evidence for the clinical observation that patients with BD have shorter RTs when in a state of emotional arousal rather than in a relaxed state. Inhibitory deficits in these patients may be because of a too strong emotional arousal. The results show that in patients with BD, relaxation and emotional arousal are inversely associated with performance in a neuropsychological task. This is in contrast to findings in healthy individuals suggesting a dysbalance in emotional regulation in these patients. [source]