Dual AV Nodal Physiology (dual + av_nodal_physiology)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Maturational Atrioventricular Nodal Physiology in the Mouse

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 5 2000
COLIN T. MAGUIRE B.S.
Mouse AV Nodal Maturation. Introduction: Dual AV nodal physiology is characterized by discontinuous conduction from the atrium to His bundle during programmed atrial extrastimulus testing (A2V2 conduction curves), AV nodal echo beats, and induction of AV nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). The purpose of this study was to characterize in vivo murine maturational AV nodal conduction properties and determine the frequency of dual AV nodal physiology and inducible AVNRT. Methods and Results: A complete transvenous in vivo electrophysiologic study was performed on 30 immature and 19 mature mice. Assessment of AV nodal conduction included (1) surface ECG and intracardiac atrial and ventricular electrograms; (2) decremental atrial pacing to the point of Wenckebach block and 2:1 conduction; and (3) programmed premature atrial extrastimuli to determine AV effective refractory periods (AVERP), construct A2V2 conduction curves, and attempt arrhythmia induction. The mean Wenckebach block interval was 73 12 msec, 2:1 block pacing cycle length was 61 11 msec, and mean AVERP100 was 54 11 msec. The frequency of dual AV nodal physiology increased with chronologic age, with discontinuous A2V2, conduction curves or AV nodal echo heats in 27% of young mice < 8 weeks and 58% in adult mice (P = 0.03). Conclusion: These data suggest that mice, similar to humans, have maturation of AV nodal physiology, hut they do not have inducible AVNRT. Characterization of murine electrophysiology may be of value in studying genetically modified animals with AV conduction abnormalities. Furthermore, extrapolation to humans may help explain the relative rarity of AVNRT in the younger pediatric population. [source]


Bimodal RR Interval Distribution in Chronic Atrial Fibrillation:

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 5 2000
Impact of Dual Atrioventricular Nodal Physiology on Long-Term Rate Control after Catheter Ablation of the Posterior Atrionodal Input
Bimodal RR Interval Distribution, Introduction: Radiofrequency (RF) catheter modification of the AV node hi patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is limited by an unpredictable decrease of the ventricular rate and a wish incidence of permanent AV block, A bimodal RR histogram has been suggested to serve as a predictor for successful outcome but the corresponding AV node properties have never been characterized, We hypothesized that a bimodal histogram indicates dual AV nodal physiology and predicts a better outcome after AV node modification in chronic AF. Methods and Results: Thirty-seven patients were prospectively subdivided into two groups according to the RR histogram of 24-hour ECC monitoring, Before to RF ablation, internal cardioversion and programmed stimulation were performed, Among the 22 patients (group I) with a bimodal RR histogram, dual AV nodal physiology was found in 17 (779f) patients, Ablation significantly decreased ventricular rate with loss of the peak of short RR cycles after ablation (mean and maximal ventricular rates: 32% and 35% rate reduction, respectively; P < 0,01), In 15 patients with a unimodal RR histogram (group II), dual AV nodal physiology was found in 2 (13%), and rate reductions were 16% and 17%, respectively, At 6 months, 3 (14%) patients in group 1 and 6 (40%) in group II underwent elective AV nodal ablation with pacemaker implantation due to intolerable rapid ventricular response to AF. Conclusion: Bimodal RR interval distribution during chronic AF suggests the presence of dual AV nodal physiology and predicts a better outcome of RF ablation of the posterior atrionocdal input. [source]


Maturational Atrioventricular Nodal Physiology in the Mouse

JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 5 2000
COLIN T. MAGUIRE B.S.
Mouse AV Nodal Maturation. Introduction: Dual AV nodal physiology is characterized by discontinuous conduction from the atrium to His bundle during programmed atrial extrastimulus testing (A2V2 conduction curves), AV nodal echo beats, and induction of AV nodal reentry tachycardia (AVNRT). The purpose of this study was to characterize in vivo murine maturational AV nodal conduction properties and determine the frequency of dual AV nodal physiology and inducible AVNRT. Methods and Results: A complete transvenous in vivo electrophysiologic study was performed on 30 immature and 19 mature mice. Assessment of AV nodal conduction included (1) surface ECG and intracardiac atrial and ventricular electrograms; (2) decremental atrial pacing to the point of Wenckebach block and 2:1 conduction; and (3) programmed premature atrial extrastimuli to determine AV effective refractory periods (AVERP), construct A2V2 conduction curves, and attempt arrhythmia induction. The mean Wenckebach block interval was 73 12 msec, 2:1 block pacing cycle length was 61 11 msec, and mean AVERP100 was 54 11 msec. The frequency of dual AV nodal physiology increased with chronologic age, with discontinuous A2V2, conduction curves or AV nodal echo heats in 27% of young mice < 8 weeks and 58% in adult mice (P = 0.03). Conclusion: These data suggest that mice, similar to humans, have maturation of AV nodal physiology, hut they do not have inducible AVNRT. Characterization of murine electrophysiology may be of value in studying genetically modified animals with AV conduction abnormalities. Furthermore, extrapolation to humans may help explain the relative rarity of AVNRT in the younger pediatric population. [source]


Decremental Ramp Atrial Extrastimuli Pacing Protocol for the Induction of Atrioventricular Nodal Re-entrant Tachycardia and Other Supraventricular Tachycardias

PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 10 2006
BHARAT K. KANTHARIA M.D.
Aim: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of decremental ramp atrial extrastimuli pacing protocol (PRTCL) for induction of atrioventricular nodal re-entrant tachycardia (AVNRT), and other supraventricular tachycardias (SVTs), compared to standard (STD) methods. Methods: The study cohort of 121 patients (age 57.51 14.02 years) who presented with documented SVTs and/or symptoms of palpitations and dizziness, and underwent invasive electrophysiological evaluation was divided into Group I (AVNRT, n = 42) and Group II (Control, n = 79). The PRTCL involved a train of six atrial extrastimuli, delivered in a decremental ramp fashion. The STD methods included continuous burst and rapid incremental pacing up to atrioventricular (AV) block cycle length, and single and occasionally double atrial extrastimuli. Prolongation in the Atrio-Hisian (,-AH) intervals achieved by both methods were compared, as were induction frequencies. Results: In Group I, three categories of responses,(1) induction of AVNRT, (2) induction of echo beats only, and (3) none,were observed in 29 (69%), 11 (26%), and 2 (5%) patients with the PRTCL, when compared with 14 (33%), 16 (38%), and 12 (29%) patients with STD methods in the baseline state without the use of pharmacological agents. The ,-AH intervals for each of these three categories were larger using PRTCL versus STD methods; 293.3 95.2 ms versus 192.9 61.4 ms (P < 0.005), 308.6 68.5 ms versus 189. 9 64.9 ms (P < 0.0005), and 203.0 86.3 ms versus 145.8 58.9 ms (P = NS), respectively. In Group II, in one patient with dual AV nodal physiology but no clinical tachycardia, the PRTCL induced nonsustained (12 beats) AVNRT. Additionally, in this group, both PRTCL and STD methods induced atrial tachycardia in two patients and orthodromic AV re-entrant tachycardia in one patient. Conclusion: Decremental ramp atrial extrastimuli pacing PRTCL demonstrates a superior response for induction of typical AVNRT as compared to STD techniques. Because of easy and reliable induction of AVNRT and echo beats by the PRTCL, we recommend it as a method to increase the likelihood of induction of AVNRT. For induction of other SVTs, the PRTCL and the STD methods are comparable. [source]