Drinking Guidelines (drinking + guideline)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Assessing alcohol guidelines in teenagers: results from a 10-year prospective study

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 2 2009
Elya Moore
Abstract Objective: To assess the value of drinking guidelines applied in adolescence for predicting alcohol-related outcomes in young adulthood. Methods: We conducted an eight-wave, population-based cohort study of 696 males and 824 females in Victoria between 1992 and 2003. Adolescent drinking was assessed at five survey waves, in six month intervals, from mean age 15.4-17.4 years. We created three measures of adolescent alcohol use using categories from NHMRC drinking guidelines: risky/high-risk drinking in the short and long term (2001), and high-risk drinking (2007). Each measure was defined according to the number of waves at which drinking was reported at or above the designated level during adolescence: non-drinkers, zero waves (low-risk drinkers), one wave, and 2+ waves. Alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related sexual behaviours were assessed at mean age 24.1 years. Results: Fourteen per cent of males and 17% of females were non-drinkers during adolescence. Using each NHMRC drinking guideline, the prevalence of each outcome for men increased with the number of waves at which drinking was reported above the low-risk level (p-values <0.007). The association was less clear for women. The prevalence of each outcome was lower among the nondrinkers compared to the low-risk drinkers for both men and women. Conclusions and implications: These findings support the emphasis in the NHMRC guidelines on abstaining from alcohol during the adolescent years. Any drinking, even at the low-risk level, may not be appropriate in adolescence. However, refinements that could better capture the risk of adolescent drinking in women would be useful. [source]


Hazardous alcohol consumption and other barriers to antiviral treatment among hepatitis C positive people receiving opioid maintenance treatment

DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, Issue 3 2007
BIANCA WATSON
Abstract Amongst people on opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), chronic hepatitis C (HCV) is common but infrequently treated. Numerous barriers, including misuse of alcohol may limit efforts at anti-viral treatment. The aim of this study was to define barriers, including alcohol misuse, to the effective treatment of HCV amongst OMT recipients. Ninety-four OMT patients completed the 3-item Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT-C). A semi-structured interview was used in 53 subjects to assess alcohol use in detail, psychological health, discrimination and access to HCV treatment. Feasibility of brief intervention for alcohol misuse was assessed. Of the screening participants, 73% reported they were HCV positive. Of the detailed interview participants, 26% reported no drinking in the past month, but 53% scored 8 or more on AUDIT and 42% exceeded NHMRC drinking guidelines. Twenty subjects received brief intervention and among 17 re-interviewed at one month, alcohol consumption fell by 3.1 g/day (p = 0.003). Severe or extremely severe depression, stress and anxiety were found in 57%, 51% and 40% of interviewees respectively. Episodic heavy drinking, mental health problems, perceived discrimination, limited knowledge concerning HCV were all common and uptake of HCV treatment was poor. Brief intervention for alcohol use problems was acceptable to OMT patients, and warrants further study. [source]


Drinking goal selection and treatment outcome in out-patients with mild-moderate alcohol dependence

DRUG AND ALCOHOL REVIEW, Issue 4 2001
SIMON J. ADAMSON
Abstract Selection of drinking goal is examined at baseline, post-treatment and at 6 months follow-up for a sample of mild-moderate alcohol-dependent out-patients. Drinking goal is identified as abstinent or controlled drinking, with the latter group being asked to further specify per session and per week drinking limits. Group comparisons for drinking goal post-treatment show those who were not assigned motivational enhancement therapy, had more drinking days and lower scores on the Alcohol Problems Questionnaire and Internal Motivation were more likely to choose controlled drinking. The only variable to predict independently whether or not the controlled drinking goal was within the promoted drinking guidelines was age, with younger participants more likely to choose a goal above this limit. Goal selection was significantly related to drinking outcome, with those aiming to drink within guidelines having better outcome than those aiming for higher limits. There was no significant difference in drinking outcome category when those aiming for within limits were compared to those aiming for abstinence. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed. [source]


The importance of drinking frequency in evaluating individuals' drinking patterns: implications for the development of national drinking guidelines

ADDICTION, Issue 7 2009
Catherine Paradis
ABSTRACT Aims This paper examines the relationship between frequency of drinking, usual daily consumption and frequency of binge drinking, taking into consideration possible age and gender differences. Participants and design Subjects were 10 466 current drinkers (5743 women and 4723 men) aged between 18 and 76 years, who participated in the GENACIS Canada (GENder Alcohol and Culture: an International Study) study. Setting Canada. Measurements The independent variable was the annual drinking frequency. The dependent variables were the usual daily quantity consumed, annual, monthly and weekly frequency of binge drinking (five drinks or more on one occasion). Findings Logistic regressions show (i) that those who drink less than once a week are less likely than weekly drinkers to take more than two drinks when they do drink; (ii) that the usual daily quantity consumed by weekly drinkers is not related to their frequency of drinking; but that (iii) the risk and frequency of binge drinking increase with the frequency of drinking. Conclusions Given that risk and frequency of binge drinking among Canadians increases with their frequency of drinking, any public recommendation to drink moderately should be made with great caution. [source]


Method for moderation: measuring lifetime risk of alcohol-attributable mortality as a basis for drinking guidelines

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue 3 2008
Jürgen Rehm
Abstract The objective of this paper was to determine separately the lifetime risk of drinking alcohol for chronic disease and acute injury outcomes as a basis for setting general population drinking guidelines for Australia. Relative risk data for different levels of average consumption of alcohol were combined with age, sex, and disease-specific risks of dying from an alcohol-attributable chronic disease. For injury, combinations of the number of drinks per occasion and frequency of drinking occasions were combined to model lifetime risk of death for different drinking pattern scenarios. A lifetime risk of injury death of 1 in 100 is reached for consumption levels of about three drinks daily per week for women, and three drinks five times a week for men. For chronic disease death, lifetime risk increases by about 10% with each 10-gram (one drink) increase in daily average alcohol consumption, although risks are higher for women than men, particularly at higher average consumption levels. Lifetime risks for injury and chronic disease combine to overall risk of alcohol-attributable mortality. In terms of guidelines, if a lifetime risk standard of 1 in 100 is set, then the implications of the analysis presented here are that both men and women should not exceed a volume of two drinks a day for chronic disease mortality, and for occasional drinking three or four drinks seem tolerable. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Assessing alcohol guidelines in teenagers: results from a 10-year prospective study

AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Issue 2 2009
Elya Moore
Abstract Objective: To assess the value of drinking guidelines applied in adolescence for predicting alcohol-related outcomes in young adulthood. Methods: We conducted an eight-wave, population-based cohort study of 696 males and 824 females in Victoria between 1992 and 2003. Adolescent drinking was assessed at five survey waves, in six month intervals, from mean age 15.4-17.4 years. We created three measures of adolescent alcohol use using categories from NHMRC drinking guidelines: risky/high-risk drinking in the short and long term (2001), and high-risk drinking (2007). Each measure was defined according to the number of waves at which drinking was reported at or above the designated level during adolescence: non-drinkers, zero waves (low-risk drinkers), one wave, and 2+ waves. Alcohol use disorders and alcohol-related sexual behaviours were assessed at mean age 24.1 years. Results: Fourteen per cent of males and 17% of females were non-drinkers during adolescence. Using each NHMRC drinking guideline, the prevalence of each outcome for men increased with the number of waves at which drinking was reported above the low-risk level (p-values <0.007). The association was less clear for women. The prevalence of each outcome was lower among the nondrinkers compared to the low-risk drinkers for both men and women. Conclusions and implications: These findings support the emphasis in the NHMRC guidelines on abstaining from alcohol during the adolescent years. Any drinking, even at the low-risk level, may not be appropriate in adolescence. However, refinements that could better capture the risk of adolescent drinking in women would be useful. [source]