Domestic Violence (domestic + violence)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE IN SAME-GENDER RELATIONSHIPS

FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 2 2006
Joanna Bunker Rohrbaugh
Physical violence occurs in 11,12% of same-gender couples, which suggests that domestic violence is an abuse of power that can happen in any type of intimate relationship, regardless of gender or sexual orientation. Although incidents of violence occur at the same rate in same-gender couples and cross-gender couples, the violence appears to be milder in same-gender couples and it is unclear what percentage of same-gender violence should be characterized as abuse or intimate terrorism. Same-gender victims also suffer from the additional stress of severe isolation and the abuser's threats to expose the victim's sexual orientation in a hostile manner. [source]


STRICTLY LIABLE: GOVERNMENTAL USE OF THE PARENT,CHILD RELATIONSHIP AS A BASIS FOR HOLDING VICTIMS LIABLE FOR THEIR CHILD'S WITNESS TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

FAMILY COURT REVIEW, Issue 1 2006
Sharon N. ClarkeArticle first published online: 10 FEB 200
Studies estimate that between three and ten million children in the United States witness domestic violence annually. Although studies have demonstrated a co-occurrence of domestic violence and child abuse, there is no concrete evidence to support the assumption that a child's exposure to domestic violence increases the risk to the child of abuse or neglect. Recently the New York State Court of Appeals determined that a child's witness to abuse does not suffice, in and of itself, to show that removal of the child is necessary or that removal is in the "best interests" of the child. Programs which have developed alternatives to presumptive removal understand the importance of viewing the interests of the battered parent and children as being in accord with each other rather than in opposition. Private and government sponsored programs have demonstrated some success in protecting the parent-child relationship, ensuring the safety of both parent and child, and increasing accountability of batterers while reducing the necessity for removals. Alternative programs are less costly to the state than foster care, and emotionally less costly to the families. [source]


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, EMPLOYMENT, AND DIVORCE,

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 4 2006
Audra J. Bowlus
Conventional wisdom suggests abused women get caught in a cycle of violence and are unable or unwilling to leave their spouses. We estimate a model of domestic violence to determine who abuses, who is abused, and how women respond to abuse via employment and divorce. In contrast to conventional wisdom, abused women are 1.7,5.7 times more likely to divorce. Employment before abuse occurs is found to be a significant deterrent. For men, witnessing violence as a child is a strong predictor of abusive behavior: re-socializing men from violent homes lowers abuse rates by 26%,48%. [source]


Domestic Violence and Out-of-hospital ProvidersA Potential Resource to Protect Battered Women

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 3 2000
M. Elaine Husni MD
Abstract Objective: The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of domestic violence (DV) in a subset of women presenting to the Boston emergency medical services (EMS) system and to evaluate documentation. A secondary objective was to determine the rate of refusal of transport to the hospital for DV-positive patients, compared with the general population. Methods: A retrospective chart review of ambulance run sheets from a nonconsecutive, convenience sample between July and December 1995 was performed. Women presenting with injury, obstetric/gynecologic complaints, or psychiatric complaints were included. Records were reviewed, and labeled as positive, probable, suggestive, or negative for DV, based on a previously used classification system. A weighted kappa test was performed, and data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test. Results: Among 1,251 charts reviewed, 876 met criteria for inclusion. The percentage of positive cases was 5.4% (95% CI = 3.9% to 6.9%), probable 10.8% (8.8% to 12.9%), suggestive 2.6% (1.6% to 3.7%), and negative 81.2% (78.6% to 83.6%). Among DV-positive patients, the refusal to transport rate was 23.4% (11.3% to 35.5%), compared with a 7.1% (5.8% to 9.3%) rate for the entire study population (n= 876), and 4.7% for the general Boston EMS population during the same year. More DV patients presented during the night shift compared with other shifts. Conclusions: Domestic violence is common in this high-risk population. A substantial proportion of women in this population refuse transport to the hospital. Out-of-hospital personnel should be trained with the tools to identify and document DV, assess patient safety, offer timely resources, and empower victims to make choices. [source]


Victims of Domestic Violence: A Proposal for a Community Diagnosis Based on One of Two Domains of NANDA Taxonomy II

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NURSING TERMINOLOGIES AND CLASSIFICATION, Issue 2003
Patricia Serpa de Souza Batista
PURPOSE To explore and identify diagnostic components to amplify NANDA nursing diagnoses by modifying the root violence. Whereas violence is nondebatable as a diagnostic concept in nursing, other alternatives have not been identified in the two existing diagnoses. METHODS Using the case study method, this qualitative study sought to identify commonalties in a population of women who were "donnas da casa" (homemakers) in a small rural community of approximately 100 families, typical of the Brazilian northeast. The sample of 7 women was identified through a larger study that had been based on health needs of the community. Data were obtained through observation during a home visit and a semistructured interview based on NANDA Taxonomy II. Observations were focused on hygiene, manner of dress, home environment, and physical and emotional state. Data were analyzed by content and clustered into major categories. From these a profile of the women and another of the partners emerged. FINDINGS Subjects ranged in age from 33 to 43 years, and number of children between 3 and 7. One of the 7 women was literate; 5 were underweight; all were slovenly attired. They appeared sad and older than their age. The majority seemed relieved to unburden themselves to the interviewers as they went through a gamut of emotions such as sadness, anguish, and irritability expressed through crying, restlessness, changes in body language, and tone of voice. The shortage of beds was supplemented by hammocks and mats or cardboard. The women spoke of being confined to their home and of male partners who drank on weekends, thus leaving them with little money for necessities of life. There were accounts of beatings when the partner returned home after drinking, overt nonacceptance of children from previous marriages, and general destruction of the family environment. New children were regarded as just another mouth to feed. DISCUSSION The profiles pointed to the necessity of identifying a new nursing diagnosis that would be linked, only tangentially, by the root violence to the two diagnoses in NANDA Taxonomies I and II. This insight led us to consider that a new method of listing NANDA diagnoses, by root only, is imperative in the evolution of Taxonomy II. Proposed descriptors, Victims of (Axis 3) and Domestic (Axis 6) would be identified by Axes, thereby facilitating the process of classifying in the Domains and Classes. The two existing NANDA diagnoses, risk for other-directed violence and risk for self-directed violence, are proposed for classification in Class 3, Violence, in Domain 11 of Taxonomy II. Safety/Protection could, by virtue of their modification power, find anchor in another domain such as Domain 6, Self-Perception. CONCLUSIONS Although Safety/Protection seems the most logical domain for classification by root, the axes, dimensions of human responses, could pull the diagnosis in another direction, thereby dictating other nursing interventions and nursing outcomes [source]


The Psychological Impact of Domestic Violence on Spanish Women,

JOURNAL OF APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 11 2005
M. Pilar Matud
This study examined the psychological impact of partner violence on 240 Spanish women who were identified as abused, comparing them to a control group of 240 non-abused women. The abused women suffered more long-lasting anxiety and insomnia, severe depression, and somatic symptomatology, and also had lower self-esteem than did the non-abused women. The severity of the psychological abuse was correlated positively with the severity of the physical abuse, while the number of years of abuse endured correlated with the women's age and number of children. The most relevant variable for predicting severe depression, social dysfunction, anxiety and insomnia, and somatic symptoms was low self-esteem. [source]


Women's "Justification" of Domestic Violence in Egypt

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 5 2009
Kathryn M. Yount
We explored the influences of women's social learning, marital resources and constraints, and exposure to norms about women's family roles on their views about wife hitting or beating among 5,450 participants in the 2005 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey. One half justified wife hitting or beating for some reason. Women from rural areas who were exposed to domestic violence more often justified such acts. Dependent wives whose husbands had more schooling, were blood relatives, and were coresident more often justified such acts. In settings where women tended to marry at older ages, women less often justified such acts. Women's resources and constraints in marriage accounted for the largest share of the variability in their attitudes about domestic violence against women. [source]


Domestic Violence and Sexually Transmitted Infections

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 4 2002
Rae Farrell RN
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Common Misconceptions in Addressing Domestic Violence in Child Custody Disputes

JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2003
PETER G. JAFFE
ABSTRACT Domestic violence has been recognized as an important factor to consider in determining the best interests of children in custody and visitation disputes. However, there remain many misconceptions about the extent and impact of domestic violence in child custody proceedings. Several misconceptions are identified and juxtaposed with the reality of emerging knowledge in this field, and implications are outlined. These issues are illustrated by the perspectives of 62 women victims and 95 children exposed to domestic violence who had to navigate the justice system after separation from an abuser. Recommendations are offered for enhancing professional education, resource development, and collaboration among courts and community service providers. [source]


Statewide Assessment of Response to Domestic Violence in Louisiana

JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 1 2003
STACY C. MOAK J.D. PH.D.
ABSTRACT The Louisiana statewide assessment of domestic violence attitudes and services was a cooperative effort between the Louisiana Community Policing Institute and the Criminal Justice Program at the University of Louisiana, Monroe. The research project included both surveys and focus groups from Louisiana's eight law enforcement planning districts. Results indicate that the response to domestic violence in Louisiana is generally inadequate. Furthermore, problems exist with respect to the definition of domestic violence among agencies. Finally, four basic barriers to successful intervention were identified, including lack of resources, lack of education and training, victims' lack of confidence in the system, and lack of a coordinated response to the problem. Recommendations are presented for overcoming these obstacles. [source]


A Community Partnership to Prepare Nursing Students to Respond to Domestic Violence

NURSING FORUM, Issue 3 2003
Karen S. Hayward RN, SANE-A
TOPIC Partnership building to prepare nursing students to respond to domestic violence through service learning. PURPOSE To describe an innovative approach to preparing nursing students to respond to domestic violence. SOURCES Clinical practice and experience, published literature, partner organizations. CONCLUSIONS This community partnership has prepared nursing students to respond effectively and with compassion to individuals and families experiencing violence. This approach can be replicated through a service learning model to support coordinated community response to domestic violence. [source]


Everyday Harm: Domestic Violence, Court Rites, and Cultures of Reconciliation by Mindie Lazarus-Black

POLAR: POLITICAL AND LEGAL ANTHROPOLOGY REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
Aisha Khan
First page of article [source]


Improving the Civil-Criminal Interface for Victims of Domestic Violence

THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 4 2007
AMANDA L. ROBINSON
The ,interface' between civil and criminal courts is completely dependent upon the advocates that support victims through the legal process, rather than any formal policy or procedure. Whilst in Cardiff these arrangements appear to be effective, developing the interface between civil and criminal courts needs to be a national endeavour to provide a consistent and streamlined response to victims of domestic violence. The co-ordination of civil with criminal justice represents the best hope of keeping victims and their children safe. [source]


Magistrates' Attitudes to Domestic Violence and Sentencing Options

THE HOWARD JOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, Issue 4 2002
Elizabeth Gilchrist
This study explored the sentencing decisions made by magistrates for perpetrators of domestic violence versus perpetrators of stranger violence. Sixty,seven magistrates considered six vignettes involving violent incidents and suggested a sentence. More magistrates suggested prison for cases where the victim of the assault was a stranger rather than the perpetrator's partner, but this was not statistically significant. Significant differences in sentencing were found where the vignettes featured alcohol, or the necessity of medical attention. Magistrates' reasoning reflected the themes of denying, minimising, justifying and victim blaming. The article discusses the need for training to dispel myths about domestic violence. [source]


Stephen King's Dolores Claiborne and Rose Madder: A Literary Backlash against Domestic Violence

THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN CULTURE, Issue 4 2007
Amy Canfield
First page of article [source]


The End of Domestic Violence

THE MODERN LAW REVIEW, Issue 5 2006
Helen Reece
In this article, I examine the rationales that have been given for extending domestic violence legislation to associated persons. I argue that the empirical and principled rationales are unfounded and that the ideological rationale is reactionary. With regard to the empirical rationale, the extent of violence that the aggregate of associated persons suffers is not high enough to justify privileging associated persons over other citizens with regard to protection from violence. In relation to the principled rationale, the impetus for domestic violence legislation was based on isolation and inequality, which are not experienced in particular by the category of associated persons when taken as a whole. With regard to the ideological rationale, it is worrying that intimacy and equality are emerging as the touchstones of a newer rationale for domestic violence legislation, which rightly has more to do with isolation and inequality than intimacy and equality. [source]


A Journey Through Ashes: One Woman's Story of Surviving Domestic Violence

ANTHROPOLOGY OF CONSCIOUSNESS, Issue 2 2009
MAUREEN C. HEARNS
ABSTRACT This is the story of Lisa1,a woman like so many others who has been abused,and of her healing journey using music and creative arts experiences. It is also a story about how music, song, poetry, art, and dance awakened her to a new consciousness and provided the necessary empowerment she needed in order to reclaim the woman she had been before experiencing the trauma of abuse. While the question of how utilization of music and the creative arts encourages personal transformation and healing is also deserving of a theoretical exploration, in this article I have chosen to foreground Lisa's story as narrative, in order to also engage the reader with the transformative potential of empowerment that comes through listening. I have chosen an approach that foregrounds Lisa's experience over theory explicitly, for, it is with the process of "finding voice" and of engaging the listener in that process, that transformation of consciousness and empowerment occurs. [source]


Surviving Domestic Violence: Gender Poverty and Agency

CHILD & FAMILY SOCIAL WORK, Issue 2 2007
Linda Piggott
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Domestic Violence and Out-of-hospital ProvidersA Potential Resource to Protect Battered Women

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 3 2000
M. Elaine Husni MD
Abstract Objective: The primary objective was to determine the prevalence of domestic violence (DV) in a subset of women presenting to the Boston emergency medical services (EMS) system and to evaluate documentation. A secondary objective was to determine the rate of refusal of transport to the hospital for DV-positive patients, compared with the general population. Methods: A retrospective chart review of ambulance run sheets from a nonconsecutive, convenience sample between July and December 1995 was performed. Women presenting with injury, obstetric/gynecologic complaints, or psychiatric complaints were included. Records were reviewed, and labeled as positive, probable, suggestive, or negative for DV, based on a previously used classification system. A weighted kappa test was performed, and data were analyzed using chi-square and t-test. Results: Among 1,251 charts reviewed, 876 met criteria for inclusion. The percentage of positive cases was 5.4% (95% CI = 3.9% to 6.9%), probable 10.8% (8.8% to 12.9%), suggestive 2.6% (1.6% to 3.7%), and negative 81.2% (78.6% to 83.6%). Among DV-positive patients, the refusal to transport rate was 23.4% (11.3% to 35.5%), compared with a 7.1% (5.8% to 9.3%) rate for the entire study population (n= 876), and 4.7% for the general Boston EMS population during the same year. More DV patients presented during the night shift compared with other shifts. Conclusions: Domestic violence is common in this high-risk population. A substantial proportion of women in this population refuse transport to the hospital. Out-of-hospital personnel should be trained with the tools to identify and document DV, assess patient safety, offer timely resources, and empower victims to make choices. [source]


Editorial: Domestic violence , time for a rethink?

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 3-4 2010
Melissa Corbally
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Domestic violence against women: Understanding social processes and women's experiences

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY & APPLIED SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2009
Jan Bostock
Abstract The prevalence of domestic abuse against women has been estimated as high as one in four. The risk is particularly high for women who are younger, economically dependent, unemployed and with children. Research about the factors that maintain situations of abuse has generally focused separately on the coping strategies of women, barriers to leaving the relationship and the perpetrators' means of abuse. In this study we used a community psychology perspective to seek a broader understanding of what maintains situations of abuse, in order to suggest interventions in a rural County in the North of England. Twelve women who had experienced domestic abuse and had used voluntary sector services agreed to be interviewed about their experiences and the resources and strategies available to them. Using grounded theory we generated four themes: (1) Commonalities and contradictions in the experience of abuse; (2) living with abuse; (3) the response of systems reinforced or challenged the abuse and (4) dealing with abuse beyond the relationship. These findings illustrate how situations of domestic abuse can be prolonged by limited options available to victims for support and protection, and a lack of active public acknowledgement that domestic abuse is unacceptable. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Common Misconceptions in Addressing Domestic Violence in Child Custody Disputes

JUVENILE AND FAMILY COURT JOURNAL, Issue 4 2003
PETER G. JAFFE
ABSTRACT Domestic violence has been recognized as an important factor to consider in determining the best interests of children in custody and visitation disputes. However, there remain many misconceptions about the extent and impact of domestic violence in child custody proceedings. Several misconceptions are identified and juxtaposed with the reality of emerging knowledge in this field, and implications are outlined. These issues are illustrated by the perspectives of 62 women victims and 95 children exposed to domestic violence who had to navigate the justice system after separation from an abuser. Recommendations are offered for enhancing professional education, resource development, and collaboration among courts and community service providers. [source]


Domestic violence in late-medieval Bologna

RENAISSANCE STUDIES, Issue 4 2004
Trevor Dean
First page of article [source]


The prevalence of domestic violence in pregnant women

BJOG : AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY, Issue 3 2003
J.K. Johnson
Objective To determine the prevalence of domestic violence in a population of pregnant women. Design Questionnaire survey. Setting Antenatal booking clinic in a north of England hospital. Population Five hundred consecutive women were included. Methods Anonymous confidential questionnaire to women who were not accompanied by their partners. Main outcome measures Disclosure of a past history of physical, emotional or sexual abuse. Results Four hundred and seventy-five questionnaires were returned (95% response rate). The prevalence of domestic violence was 17%. Domestic violence was highest in the age group 26,30 years and boyfriends were the main perpetrators. Punching and slapping were the most common pattern of violence, and 10% of women experiencing domestic violence had had forced sexual activity. Conclusion The prevalence of domestic violence in a cohort of pregnant women in the north of England was 17%. Consideration should be given for routine screening for domestic violence in pregnancy to institute effective intervention strategies. [source]


Assessment of a Cross-Disciplinary Domestic Violence Training for Emergency Medicine Residents and Law Students

ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2008
Cameron Crandall
Objectives:, Domestic violence (DV) patients often have complex medical, social and legal issues that challenge assessment, treatment and referral. We designed a brief cross-disciplinary training for emergency medicine residents and upper level law students to determine the baseline level of resident and law student competence in assessment and management of patients with a history of domestic violence. Methods:, The study included 23 emergency medicine residents and 28 upper level law students at an urban university. The design included pretest, intervention, and retest with 4 standardized patient assessments. The intervention included for each 2 hours of cross-disciplinary lectures on DV and one joint case-based 2 hour learning session with the medical and legal learners. Communication skills (CSs) were assessed using a validated criterion standard. History taking competence (HX) was assessed with a prespecified checklist of critical elements designed to elicit key medico-legal factors relevant to each case. Data were compared with t tests. Results:, 18 (78%) residents and 26 (93%) law students completed the study. Pre-intervention, residents scored 63% (8% standard deviation (SD)) on CS and gathered 71% (13%) of critical HX elements. Law students scored 62% (8%) on CS and gathered 66% (8%) of critical HX elements. Residents (64% (6%)) and law students (63% (6%) showed similar post-intervention CS scores. Both residents (77% (10%), improvement 6%, p = 0.13) and law students (71% (14%), improvement 8%, p = .15) showed modest but non-significant improvement in critical HX gathering. Conclusions:, A brief cross-disciplinary training between medical and legal learners demonstrated low baseline scores in DV assessment for both learning groups with modest, but non-significant improvements in gathering of critical HX elements following intervention. Longer didactic training or more focused skill building might improve skills. [source]


Psychological abuse between parents: associations with child maltreatment from a population-based sample

CHILD: CARE, HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 6 2008
Richard Reading
Psychological abuse between parents: associations with child maltreatment from a population-based sample ChangJ. J., TheodoreA. D., MartinS. L. & RunyanD. K. ( 2008 ) Child Abuse & Neglect , 32 , 819 , 829 . Objective This study examined the association between partner psychological abuse and child maltreatment perpetration. Methods This cross-sectional study examined a population-based sample of mothers with children aged 0,17 years in North and South Carolina (n = 1149). Mothers were asked about the occurrence of potentially neglectful or abusive behaviours towards their children by either themselves or their husband/partner in the past year. Partner psychological abuse was categorized as no psychological abuse (reference), husband perpetrates, wife perpetrates or both perpetrates. Outcome measures for psychological and physical abuse of the child had four categories: no abuse (reference), mother perpetrates, father/father-figure perpetrates or both parents perpetrates, whereas child neglect was binary. Adjusted relative risk ratios (aRRRs), adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated with regression models. A relative risk ratio was the ratio of odds ratios derived from multinomial logistic regression. Results Children were at the greatest risk of maltreatment when parents psychologically abused each other versus no abuse: the aRRR for child psychological abuse by the mother only was 16.13 (95% CI 5.11, 50.92) compared with no abuse, controlling for child age, gender, Medicaid welfare and mother's level of education. Both parents psychologically abuse each other versus no abuse also results in an aRRR of 14.57 (95% CI 3.85, 55.16) for child physical abuse by both parents compared with no abuse. When only the husband perpetrates towards the wife, the odds of child neglect was 5.29 times as much as families with no psychological abuse (95% CI 1.36, 20.62). Conclusions Partner psychological abuse was strongly related to child maltreatment. Children experienced a substantially increased risk of maltreatment when partner psychological abuse was present in the homes. Practice implications This study observed that intimate partner psychological abuse significantly increased risk of child maltreatment. Increased public awareness of partner psychological abuse is warranted. Primary prevention should include education about the seriousness of partner psychological abuse in families. Domestic violence and child welfare agencies must recognize the link between partner psychological abuse and child maltreatment and work together to develop effective screening for each of these problems. [source]


Domestic violence: what should paediatricians do?

CHILD: CARE, HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT, Issue 6 2008
Richard Reading
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Separation, domestic violence, and divorce mediation

CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2006
Desmond Ellis
DOVE, an instrument designed to assess and manage the risk of domestic violence, was administered to a sequential, random sample of one hundred forty-seven male and female partners prior to their participation in divorce mediation. Nineteen statistically significant predictors of both pre- and post-separation violence and abuse were identified. Conjugal violence and abuse, male partner control, and mental health problems were prominent among predictors of post-separation violence and abuse. Safety plan interventions and referrals aimed at promoting women's safety during and following their participation in divorce mediation are identified in the concluding segment of the paper. [source]


POLICE INTERVENTION AND THE REPEAT OF DOMESTIC ASSAULT

CRIMINOLOGY, Issue 3 2005
RICHARD B. FELSON
We use the National Crime Victimization Survey to examine whether domestic violence is less likely to be repeated if it is reported to the police and if the offender is arrested. Our longitudinal analyses suggest that reporting has a fairly strong deterrent effect, whereas the effect of arrest is small and statistically insignificant. We find no support for the hypothesis that offenders retaliate when victims (rather than third parties) call the police or when victims sign complaints. We also find no evidence that the effects of reporting or arrest depend on the seriousness of the offense, a history of violence by the offender or sociodemographic characteristics. Our results suggest that the best policies for deterrence will be those that encourage victims and third parties to report violence by intimate partners to the police. [source]


CULTURALLY-FOCUSED BATTERER COUNSELING FOR AFRICAN-AMERICAN MEN,

CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 2 2007
EDWARD W. GONDOLF
Research Summary: Clinicians and researchers have strongly recommended culturally-focused counseling with African-American men arrested for domestic violence. An experimental clinical trial tested the effectiveness of this approach against conventional cognitive-behavioral counseling in all-African-American groups and in racially-mixed groups (N = 501). No significant difference was found in the reassault rate reported by the men's female partners over a 12-month follow-up period (23% overall). During that period, men in the racially-mixed groups were, moreover, half as likely to be rearrested for domestic violence as the men in the culturally-focused groups. The men's level of racial identification did not significantly affect the outcomes of the counseling options. Policy Implications: Simply adding a culturally-focused counseling group to domestic violence programs does not seem in itself to improve outcomes. In the current study, the culturally-focused counseling was an appendage to an existing agency closely linked to the criminal justice system. Culturally-focused counseling may prove to be more effective within community-based organizations tied to local services and supports. [source]