Adolescent Problem Behaviors (adolescent + problem_behavior)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The adolescent origins of substance use disorders

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue S1 2008
Matt McGue
Abstract Although early use of alcohol during adolescence has been consistently associated with increased risk of alcoholism in adulthood, the specific mechanisms that underlie this association remain unclear. We describe a program of epidemiological twin-family research that shows that early use of alcohol is best conceptualized as an indicator of a more general propensity to engage in adolescent problem behavior. Adolescent problem behavior, in turn, is a risk factor for a broad range of adult externalizing disorders, of which alcoholism is but one manifestation. These findings are shown to be consistent with a dual-process model whereby early adolescent problem behavior is associated with increased risk of adult psychopathology because both are indicators of a common inherited liability and because early adolescent problem behavior increases the likelihood an adolescent is exposed to high-risk environments. We conclude with a discussion of the importance of cross-cultural research, which may be especially informative for identifying the consequences of early adolescent drinking. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Marijuana Use Among the Adolescent Children of High-Risk Drug-Abusing Fathers

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL ON ADDICTIONS, Issue 2 2002
David W. Brook M.D.
This study examines marijuana use among children of male drug abusers. Subjects were 83 African-American and European-American male drug abusers, of whom the majority were injection drug users, and their children. Thirty-one of the fathers were HIV-positive and 52 were HIV-negative. Using logistic regression analyses, we explored cross-sectionally the relationship between four psychosocial domains (ie, paternal attributes, adolescent problem behaviors, father-adolescent relations, and environment) and adolescent marijuana use. The father's use of illegal drugs and his failure to cope adaptively predicted adolescent marijuana use, while a close father-child bond predicted less adolescent marijuana use. Adolescent problem behaviors predicted an increased likelihood of marijuana use. Furthermore, hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that the adolescent's problem behavior mediated the associations between both the father-adolescent relationship and environmental factors with adolescent marijuana use. Reducing the risk factors and enhancing the protective factors within each of the domains could help reduce marijuana use among the adolescent children of drug-abusing fathers. Moreover, if a father is a drug abuser, it is important to help him establish a close bond with his child in order to help attenuate the influence of his drug use on the child's marijuana use. [source]


The adolescent origins of substance use disorders

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Issue S1 2008
Matt McGue
Abstract Although early use of alcohol during adolescence has been consistently associated with increased risk of alcoholism in adulthood, the specific mechanisms that underlie this association remain unclear. We describe a program of epidemiological twin-family research that shows that early use of alcohol is best conceptualized as an indicator of a more general propensity to engage in adolescent problem behavior. Adolescent problem behavior, in turn, is a risk factor for a broad range of adult externalizing disorders, of which alcoholism is but one manifestation. These findings are shown to be consistent with a dual-process model whereby early adolescent problem behavior is associated with increased risk of adult psychopathology because both are indicators of a common inherited liability and because early adolescent problem behavior increases the likelihood an adolescent is exposed to high-risk environments. We conclude with a discussion of the importance of cross-cultural research, which may be especially informative for identifying the consequences of early adolescent drinking. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Intervention fidelity in family-based prevention counseling for adolescent problem behaviors

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
Aaron Hogue
This study examined fidelity in multidimensional family prevention (MDFP), a family-based prevention counseling model for adolescents at high risk for substance abuse and related behavior problems, in comparison to two empirically based treatments for adolescent drug abuse: multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Randomly selected videotapes of 109 MDFP sessions, 57 MDFT sessions, and 31 CBT sessions were observationally rated along two key dimensions of implementation: intervention parameters and intervention techniques. Overall, MDFP was similar to MDFT and different from CBT in a manner congruent with its theoretical principles of interactional, systemic intervention. However, deficiencies in parental monitoring and developmental knowledge interventions point the way for continued model development. The utility of fidelity process research for conveying intervention technology along the prevention-treatment continuum of mental health services is discussed. 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comm Psychol 33: 191,211, 2005. [source]


Effects of Parental Monitoring and Peer Deviance on Substance Use and Delinquency

JOURNAL OF MARRIAGE AND FAMILY, Issue 4 2006
Grace M. Barnes
From socialization theory, it was hypothesized that parental support and monitoring as well as peer deviance would influence individual trajectories of alcohol misuse, other substance use, and delinquency. Six waves of data were analyzed using interviews with 506 adolescents in a general population sample. Results from multilevel modeling showed that monitoring significantly predicted adolescents' initial levels (intercepts) of alcohol misuse and delinquency. Parental monitoring strongly predicted the rates of increase (slope) in all 3 problem behaviors. Peer deviance significantly predicted initial levels of all problem behaviors and the rates of increase in them. This study provides evidence that both effective parenting and avoidance of associations with delinquent peers are important factors in preventing adolescent problem behaviors. [source]


Family Relationships and Adolescent Psychosocial Outcomes: Converging Findings From Eastern and Western Cultures

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON ADOLESCENCE, Issue 4 2004
Julia Dmitrieva
This study investigated the role of parent,adolescent relationships in mediating the association between family-related negative life events and adolescent depressive symptoms and problem behaviors among 1,696 eleventh graders from the United States (n=201), China (n=502), Korea (n=497), and Czech Republic (n=496). Results indicated that perceived parental involvement and parent,adolescent conflict mediated the link between family-related life events and adolescent depressed mood. The path from family-related life events to adolescent problem behaviors was mediated by perceived parental involvement, parent,adolescent conflict, and perceived parental sanctions of adolescent misconduct. With the exception of minor cross-cultural differences in the magnitude of associations among variables, this study revealed considerable similarity in the association of family factors with adolescent internalizing and externalizing symptomatology. The findings contribute to the growing literature on culture-general developmental processes. [source]


Beyond parents and peers: The role of important non-parental adults (VIPs) in adolescent development in China and the United States

PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 1 2003
Chuansheng Chen
To understand cross-cultural differences and similarities in the social contexts for adolescent development, 201 American and 502 Chinese 11th graders were surveyed about a non-parental adult who had played an important role in their lives (VIPs). Results showed that, compared to adolescents' VIPs in the United States, their Chinese counterparts were more likely to be teachers, to provide support in education-related areas, and to be considered role models. Chinese VIPs were also reported to exhibit fewer problem behaviors and depressive symptoms and express a higher level of sanctions against adolescent problem behaviors than American VIPs. Adolescents in both cultures reported that their VIPs' positive qualities surpassed those of parents and peers. VIPs' characteristics (e.g., sanctions, problem behavior, warmth, and depressed mood) were significantly associated with adolescent outcomes. These results suggest that although there are cross-cultural differences in the nature of VIPs, VIPs are a very important part of social context for adolescent development in both the United States and China. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Psychol Schs 40: 35,50, 2003. [source]


Marijuana Use Among the Adolescent Children of High-Risk Drug-Abusing Fathers

THE AMERICAN JOURNAL ON ADDICTIONS, Issue 2 2002
David W. Brook M.D.
This study examines marijuana use among children of male drug abusers. Subjects were 83 African-American and European-American male drug abusers, of whom the majority were injection drug users, and their children. Thirty-one of the fathers were HIV-positive and 52 were HIV-negative. Using logistic regression analyses, we explored cross-sectionally the relationship between four psychosocial domains (ie, paternal attributes, adolescent problem behaviors, father-adolescent relations, and environment) and adolescent marijuana use. The father's use of illegal drugs and his failure to cope adaptively predicted adolescent marijuana use, while a close father-child bond predicted less adolescent marijuana use. Adolescent problem behaviors predicted an increased likelihood of marijuana use. Furthermore, hierarchical regression analysis demonstrated that the adolescent's problem behavior mediated the associations between both the father-adolescent relationship and environmental factors with adolescent marijuana use. Reducing the risk factors and enhancing the protective factors within each of the domains could help reduce marijuana use among the adolescent children of drug-abusing fathers. Moreover, if a father is a drug abuser, it is important to help him establish a close bond with his child in order to help attenuate the influence of his drug use on the child's marijuana use. [source]