Distributed Applications (distributed + application)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Out-of-Core and Dynamic Programming for Data Distribution on a Volume Visualization Cluster

COMPUTER GRAPHICS FORUM, Issue 1 2009
S. Frank
I.3.2 [Computer Graphics]: Distributed/network graphics; C.2.4 [Distributed Systems]: Distributed applications Abstract Ray directed volume-rendering algorithms are well suited for parallel implementation in a distributed cluster environment. For distributed ray casting, the scene must be partitioned between nodes for good load balancing, and a strict view-dependent priority order is required for image composition. In this paper, we define the load balanced network distribution (LBND) problem and map it to the NP-complete precedence constrained job-shop scheduling problem. We introduce a kd-tree solution and a dynamic programming solution. To process a massive data set, either a parallel or an out-of-core approach is required. Parallel preprocessing is performed by render nodes on data, which are allocated using a static data structure. Volumetric data sets often contain a large portion of voxels that will never be rendered, or empty space. Parallel preprocessing fails to take advantage of this. Our slab-projection slice, introduced in this paper, tracks empty space across consecutive slices of data to reduce the amount of data distributed and rendered. It is used to facilitate out-of-core bricking and kd-tree partitioning. Load balancing using each of our approaches is compared with traditional methods using several segmented regions of the Visible Korean data set. [source]


A decentralized and fault-tolerant Desktop Grid system for distributed applications,

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 3 2010
Heithem Abbes
Abstract This paper proposes a decentralized and fault-tolerant software system for the purpose of managing Desktop Grid resources. Its main design principle is to eliminate the need for a centralized server, therefore to remove the single point of failure and bottleneck of existing Desktop Grids. Instead, each node can play alternatively the role of client or server. Our main contribution is to design the PastryGrid protocol (based on Pastry) for Desktop Grid in order to support a wider class of applications, especially the distributed application with precedence between tasks. Compared with a centralized system, we evaluate our approach over 205 machines executing 2500 tasks. The results we obtain show that our decentralized system outperforms XtremWeb-CH which is configured as a master/slave, with respect to the turnaround time. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Automated application component placement in data centers using mathematical programming

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NETWORK MANAGEMENT, Issue 6 2008
Xiaoyun Zhu
In this article we address the application component placement (ACP) problem for a data center. The problem is defined as follows: for a given topology of a network consisting of switches, servers and storage devices with varying capabilities, and for a given specification of a component-based distributed application, decide which physical server should be assigned to each application component, such that the application's processing, communication and storage requirements are satisfied without creating bottlenecks in the infrastructure, and that scarce resources are used most efficiently. We explain how the ACP problem differs from traditional task assignment in distributed systems, or existing grid scheduling problems. We describe our approach of formalizing this problem using a mathematical optimization framework and further formulating it as a mixed integer program (MIP). We then present our ACP solver using GAMS and CPLEX to automate the decision-making process. The solver was numerically tested on a number of examples, ranging from a 125-server real data center to a set of hypothetical data centers with increasing size. In all cases the ACP solver found an optimal solution within a reasonably short time. In a numerical simulation comparing our solver to a random selection algorithm, our solver resulted in much more efficient use of scarce network resources and allowed more applications to be placed in the same infrastructure. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


In search of simplicity: a self-organizing group communication overlay

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 7 2010
Matei Ripeanu
Abstract Group communication primitives have broad utility as building blocks for distributed applications. The challenge is to create and maintain the distributed structures that support these primitives while accounting for volatile end-nodes and variable network characteristics. Most solutions proposed to date rely on complex algorithms or on global information, thus limiting the scale of deployments and acceptance outside the academic realm. This article introduces a low-complexity, self-organizing solution for building and maintaining data dissemination trees, which we refer to as Unstructured Multi-source Overlay (UMO). UMO uses traditional distributed systems techniques: layering, soft-state, and passive data collection to adapt to the dynamics of the physical network and maintain data dissemination trees. The result is a simple, adaptive system with lower overheads than more complex alternatives. We implemented UMO and evaluated it on a 100-node PlanetLab testbed and on up to 1024-node emulated ModelNet networks. Extensive experimental evaluations demonstrate UMOs low overhead, efficient network usage compared with alternative solutions, and the ability to quickly adapt to network changes and to recover from failures. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A decentralized and fault-tolerant Desktop Grid system for distributed applications,

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 3 2010
Heithem Abbes
Abstract This paper proposes a decentralized and fault-tolerant software system for the purpose of managing Desktop Grid resources. Its main design principle is to eliminate the need for a centralized server, therefore to remove the single point of failure and bottleneck of existing Desktop Grids. Instead, each node can play alternatively the role of client or server. Our main contribution is to design the PastryGrid protocol (based on Pastry) for Desktop Grid in order to support a wider class of applications, especially the distributed application with precedence between tasks. Compared with a centralized system, we evaluate our approach over 205 machines executing 2500 tasks. The results we obtain show that our decentralized system outperforms XtremWeb-CH which is configured as a master/slave, with respect to the turnaround time. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A new task scheduling method for distributed programs that require memory management

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 9 2006
Hiroshi Koide
Abstract In parallel and distributed applications, it is very likely that object-oriented languages, such as Java and Ruby, and large-scale semistructured data written in XML will be employed. However, because of their inherent dynamic memory management, parallel and distributed applications must sometimes suspend the execution of all tasks running on the processors. This adversely affects their execution on the parallel and distributed platform. In this paper, we propose a new task scheduling method called CP/MM (Critical Path/Memory Management) which can efficiently schedule tasks for applications requiring memory management. The underlying concept is to consider the cost due to memory management when the task scheduling system allocates ready (executable) coarse-grain tasks, or macro-tasks, to processors. We have developed three task scheduling modules, including CP/MM, for a task scheduling system which is implemented on a Java RMI (Remote Method Invocation) communication infrastructure. Our experimental results show that CP/MM can successfully prevent high-priority macro-tasks from being affected by the garbage collection arising from memory management, so that CP/MM can efficiently schedule distributed programs whose critical paths are relatively long. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Performance comparison of checkpoint and recovery protocols

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 15 2003
Himadri Sekhar Paul
Abstract Checkpoint and rollback recovery is a well-known technique for providing fault tolerance to long-running distributed applications. Performance of a checkpoint and recovery protocol depends on the characteristics of the application and the system on which it runs. However, given an application and system environment, there is no easy way to identify which checkpoint and recovery protocol will be most suitable for it. Conventional approaches require implementing the application with all the protocols under consideration, running them on the desired system, and comparing their performances. This process can be very tedious and time consuming. This paper first presents the design and implementation of a simulation environment, distributed process simulation or dPSIM, which enables easy implementation and evaluation of checkpoint and recovery protocols. The tool enables the protocols to be simulated under a wide variety of application, system, and network characteristics. The paper then presents performance evaluation of five checkpoint and recovery protocols. These protocols are implemented and executed in dPSIM under different simulated application, system, and network characteristics. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


A quality-of-service-based framework for creating distributed heterogeneous software components

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 12 2002
Rajeev R. Raje
Abstract Component-based software development offers a promising solution for taming the complexity found in today's distributed applications. Today's and future distributed software systems will certainly require combining heterogeneous software components that are geographically dispersed. For the successful deployment of such a software system, it is necessary that its realization, based on assembling heterogeneous components, not only meets the functional requirements, but also satisfies the non-functional criteria such as the desired quality of service (QoS). In this paper, a framework based on the notions of a meta-component model, a generative domain model and QoS parameters is described. A formal specification based on two-level grammar is used to represent these notions in a tightly integrated way so that QoS becomes a part of the generative domain model. A simple case study is described in the context of this framework. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Scalable and fault-tolerant key agreement protocol for dynamic groups

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NETWORK MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2006
A. Abdel-Hafez
With the widespread use of the Internet, the popularity of group communication-based applications has grown considerably. Since most communications over the Internet involve the traversal of insecure networks, basic security services are necessary for these collaborative applications. These security services can be facilitated if the authorized group members share a common secret. In such distributed applications, key agreement protocols are preferred to key distribution protocols. In the past two decades, there have been many proposals for key agreement protocols. Most of these protocols are not efficient and limit the size of the underlying group. In this paper, we consider the scalability problem in group key agreement protocols. We propose a novel framework based on extension of the Diffie,Hellman key exchange protocol. The efficiency of our protocol comes from the clustering of the group members, where the common session key is established collaboratively by all participants. We present the auxiliary protocols needed when the membership changes. We show that our protocol is superior in complexity in both communication and computation overheads required to generate the session key. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]