Distinguished Lecture (distinguish + lecture)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Ethnography, Comparison, and Changing Times

ETHOS, Issue 4 2005
ROBERT I. LEVY
This article, based on Levy's Distinguished Lecture at the 2001 meeting of the Society for Psychological Anthropology, summarizes his views on how the psychologies of actors and the community forms and structures in which they are embedded, dancers and their dances, are mutually constituted. In particular, he contrasts two distinct communities where he did field research: Piri, a small village in French Polynesia; and Bhaktapur, a religious city in the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal, suggesting that the particular cultures of these two places give rise to different forms of public life and childrearing, resulting in differing kinds of learning during childhood and ultimately in distinctive experiences of the self. [source]


Ethnography in/of Nations GAD Distinguished Lecture, 2003

GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY BULLETIN OF THE GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY DIVISION, Issue 2 2004
Lila Abu-Lughod
First page of article [source]


Decade of Behavior Distinguished Lecture: Development of physical aggression during infancy

INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Issue 5 2004
Richard E. Tremblay
Violence is a major public concern in our modern societies. To prevent this violence we need to understand how innocent children grow into violent adolescents and adults. It is generally believed that humans are most frequently physically aggressive during adolescence and early adulthood. With longitudinal studies of large samples of children from different countries that followed them from infancy to adulthood, scientists tried to discover at what age individuals learn how to physically aggress. These studies indicated that the peak age for physical aggression was not during early adulthood, adolescence, or even kindergarten, but rather between 24 and 42 months after birth. Although there are important individual differences in children's use of physical aggression, most of them will learn to use socially acceptable alternatives when angry or frustrated before they enter school. To prevent chronic physical aggression and its terrible consequences over the whole life course, modern societies should provide children with the optimal prenatal and postnatal environments. [source]


Irving B. Harris Distinguished Lecture: Reflective supervision in infant,family programs: Adding clinical process to nonclinical settings

INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Issue 5 2004
Linda Gilkerson
Programs that are moving toward relationship-based practice are finding it essential to integrate some form of reflective process into their program practices in order to achieve their goals. Reflective supervision is proposed as a method to support change toward relationship-based practice with infants and their families. The elements and structure of reflective supervision are described and several examples are given showing the implementation of this approach in two different settings: neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and community-based early intervention programs. [source]


Culture Matters in the Neolithic Transition and Emergence of Hierarchy in Thy, Denmark: Distinguished Lecture

AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 1 2004
TIMOTHY EARLE
Abstract How did the emergence of hierarchical social structure that followed the domestication of plants and animals in the Neolithic actually come about? I suggest that material media were instrumental in this transformation, as culture was changed by incorporating such newmedia as landscape constructions and elaborate prestige objects. During the Neolithic transition in Thy, Denmark, local corporate groups formed, and, subsequently, Bronze Age chieftains came to power. Shifts in material culture suggest possible connections to these institutional changes, namely the materialization of property rights by burial monuments and permanent domestic architecture and the centralization of power through the controlled production of wealth objects. I conclude that, as part of social process, the nature of culture has been transformed by incorporating material culture with specific characteristics of scale, permanency, and control that were vital to institutional change. [source]