Disorder Scale (disorder + scale)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Disorder Scale

  • stress disorder scale


  • Selected Abstracts


    Demographic and clinical characteristics of motor vehicle accident victims in the community general health outpatient clinic: a comparison of PTSD and non-PTSD subjects

    DEPRESSION AND ANXIETY, Issue 4 2007
    Marina Kupchik M.D.
    Abstract Motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) are the leading cause of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the general population, often with enduring symptomatology. This study details epidemiological and clinical features that characterize PTSD among MVA victims living in a nonhospitalized community setting long after the MVA event, and includes exploration of premorbid and peritraumatic factors. MVA victims (n=60; 23 males, 37 females) identified from the registry of a community general health outpatient clinic during a 7-year period were administered an extensive structured battery of epidemiological, diagnostic and clinical ratings. Results indicated that 30 subjects (50%; 12 males, 18 females) had MVA-related PTSD (MVAR-PTSD). Among those with PTSD, 16 individuals exhibited PTSD in partial remission, and six, in full remission. There were no significant demographic or occupational function differences between PTSD and non-PTSD groups. The most common comorbid conditions with MVAR-PTSD were social phobia (20%), generalized anxiety disorder (7.8%) and obsessive,compulsive disorder (0.5%). Previous MVA's were not predictive of PTSD. Subjects with MVAR-PTSD scored worse on the Clinician-Administered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale, Part 2 (CAPS-2), Impact of Event Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Impulsivity Scale, and Toronto Alexithymia Rating Scale. Study observations indicate a relatively high rate of PTSD following an MVA in a community-based sample. The relatively high rate of partially remitted MVAR-PTSD (N=16) underscores the importance of subsyndromal forms of illness. Alexithymia may be an adaptive method of coping with event stress. The development of PTSD appears not to be associated with the severity of MVA-related physical injury. Depression and Anxiety 24:244,250, 2007. 2006 Wiley,Liss, Inc. [source]


    Psychological functioning and health-related quality of life in adulthood after preterm birth

    DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 8 2007
    Stuart R Dalziel FRACP PhD
    The aim of this study was to determine if preterm birth is associated with socioeconomic status (SES), psychological functioning, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adulthood. We used prospective follow-up of 192 adult offspring of mothers who took part in a randomized controlled trial of antenatal betamethasone for the prevention of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (66 born at term [33 males, 33 females] 126 born preterm [66 males, 60 females]). Cognitive functioning was assessed using the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence. Working memory and attention was assessed using the Benton Visual Retention Test, the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test, and the Brown Attention Deficit Disorder Scale. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory II, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Schizotypy Traits Questionnaire. Handedness was assessed using the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. HRQoL was assessed using the Short Form-36 Health Survey. Moderately preterm birth (median gestation 34wks, mean birthweight 1946g [SD 463g]) was not related to later marital status, educational attainment, SES, cognitive functioning, working memory, attention, or symptoms of anxiety or schizotypy at 31 years of age. Preterm birth was associated with fewer symptoms of depression and higher levels of satisfaction in three of the eight HRQoL domains measured (bodily pain, general health perception, and social functioning). Adults who were born moderately preterm have SES, psychological functioning, and HRQoL consistent with those who were born at term. This good long-term outcome cannot be extrapolated to those with early childhood disability or very low birthweights. [source]


    The Yale,Brown,Cornell eating disorder scale in women with anorexia nervosa: What is it measuring?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 3 2009
    Jennifer Jordan PhD
    Abstract Objective: The Yale,Brown,Cornell Eating Disorder Scale (YBC-EDS) assesses eating disorder preoccupations, rituals, and symptom severity. This study examines the YBC-EDS in relation to eating disorder psychopathology, obsessionality, and impul-sivityvariables in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and sensitivity of the YBC-EDS to change after psychotherapy. Method: Participants were 56 women with "spectrum" AN (14.5 < BMI < 19). Variables examined in relation to the YBC-EDS were as follows: eating pathology, obsessionality (obsessive compulsive disorder and personality diagnoses, perfectionism), and impulsivity (borderline personality, impulsive traits, and behaviors). YBC-EDS scores were examined pre- and post-treatment. Results: Eating Disorder Examination scores most strongly predicted the YBC-EDS. As expected, perfectionism was significantly associated, but so was impulsivity. YBC-EDS scores were significantly different in those with good versus poor global outcome after therapy. Unexpectedly, maximum lifetime BMI was correlated with the YBC-EDS. Discussion: The YBC-EDS most strongly measured eating disorder severity and reflected change after psychotherapy for AN. 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2009 [source]


    Personality traits after recovery from eating disorders: Do subtypes differ?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 4 2006
    Angela Wagner MD
    Abstract Objective: We compared individuals recovered from anorexia (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) to determine characteristics that are shared by or distinguish eating disorder (ED) subtypes. Method: Sixty women recovered for , 1 year from AN or BN were compared with 47 control women (CW). Assessments included the Yale-Brown-Cornell Eating Disorder Scale, the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, the Temperament and Character Inventory, and Structured Clinical Interviews for DSM-IV. Results: Individuals recovered from an ED had similar scores for mood and personality variables that were significantly higher than the scores for CW. Few recovered subjects had Cluster B personality disorder. Most individuals recovered within 6 years of their ED onset. A latent profile analysis identified an "inhibited" and "disinhibited" cluster based on personality traits. Conclusion: A wide range of symptoms persist after recovery and do not differ between subtypes of ED. These findings may aid in identifying traits that create vulnerabilities for developing an ED. 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2006. [source]


    Detainment and health: The case of the Lebanese hostages of war

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 2 2010
    Laila F. Farhood
    ABSTRACT The purpose of the current research was to compare former detainees of Khiam prison to a comparison group regarding depression, anxiety, presence of chronic diseases, smoking, and alcohol drinking. The sample consisted of 118 ex-detainees and 90 community controls. The Beck Depression Inventory, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Clinician-Administered Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale, and the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire were used. The ex-detainees suffered from an increased level of depression, high anxiety scores, increased chronic diseases, smoked more, and consumed more alcohol than their comparison group. Regression analyses showed that detainment independently predicted depression and anxiety. [source]


    Validity of the osu post-traumatic stress disorder scale and the behavior assessment system for children self-report of personality with child tornado survivors,

    PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 2 2008
    Linda Garner Evans
    Tornadoes and other natural disasters can lead to anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children. This study provides further validity for the Oklahoma State University Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale,Child Form (OSU PTSDS-CF) by comparing it to the Behavior Assessment System for Children Self-Report of Personality (BASC-SRP). Correlations were significant at 0.01 between BASC-SRP scales of Anxiety, Atypicality, and Clinical Maladjustment, and at least 0.05 between OSU PTSDS-CF scales for Social Stress, Depression, Inadequacy, and Emotional Symptoms Index (ESI). Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) yielded significant differences at 0.01 between children with and without PTSD, based on OSU PTSDS-CF cut-off scores, for BASC-SRP Anxiety, Atypicality, and Clinical Maladjustment. ANOVAs were significant at 0.05 for Social Stress, Locus of Control, Relationship with Parents, and ESI. Results yielded moderate effect sizes, and BASC-SRP means were within normal limits for all groups. Practitioners are encouraged to supplement the BASC-SRP with PTSD measures in children who have experienced trauma. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    The Yale,Brown,Cornell eating disorder scale in women with anorexia nervosa: What is it measuring?

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 3 2009
    Jennifer Jordan PhD
    Abstract Objective: The Yale,Brown,Cornell Eating Disorder Scale (YBC-EDS) assesses eating disorder preoccupations, rituals, and symptom severity. This study examines the YBC-EDS in relation to eating disorder psychopathology, obsessionality, and impul-sivityvariables in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) and sensitivity of the YBC-EDS to change after psychotherapy. Method: Participants were 56 women with "spectrum" AN (14.5 < BMI < 19). Variables examined in relation to the YBC-EDS were as follows: eating pathology, obsessionality (obsessive compulsive disorder and personality diagnoses, perfectionism), and impulsivity (borderline personality, impulsive traits, and behaviors). YBC-EDS scores were examined pre- and post-treatment. Results: Eating Disorder Examination scores most strongly predicted the YBC-EDS. As expected, perfectionism was significantly associated, but so was impulsivity. YBC-EDS scores were significantly different in those with good versus poor global outcome after therapy. Unexpectedly, maximum lifetime BMI was correlated with the YBC-EDS. Discussion: The YBC-EDS most strongly measured eating disorder severity and reflected change after psychotherapy for AN. 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2009 [source]


    Evaluating binge eating disorder in children: Development of the children's binge eating disorder scale (C-BEDS)

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 1 2007
    Jennifer R. Shapiro PhD
    Abstract Objective: Binge eating disorder (BED) may manifest itself differently in children than adults. Recently researchers have proposed provisional criteria for measuring BED in children. The purpose of this study was to develop a brief, simple, structured, interviewer-administered scale (C-BEDS) to measure BED in children according to the provisional criteria and to compare diagnostic results with SCID diagnoses. Method: A total of 55 children between the ages of 5 and 13 were interviewed with both the SCID and the C-BEDS. Results: There was a significant association between the two measures (p = .001). Both measures adequately identified children with binge eating behaviors. Conclusion: Both the provisional criteria and the C-BEDS may be developmentally appropriate for use with children, although the C-BEDS may be a better screening instrument as it quickly identified children with subsyndromal BED. If used by physicians and other health providers, this brief measure may assist with identifying early onset binge eating behaviors and avoiding the associated consequences, including adult BED, obesity, and other comorbidities. 2006 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 2006 [source]


    Validity of the osu post-traumatic stress disorder scale and the behavior assessment system for children self-report of personality with child tornado survivors,

    PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 2 2008
    Linda Garner Evans
    Tornadoes and other natural disasters can lead to anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children. This study provides further validity for the Oklahoma State University Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Scale,Child Form (OSU PTSDS-CF) by comparing it to the Behavior Assessment System for Children Self-Report of Personality (BASC-SRP). Correlations were significant at 0.01 between BASC-SRP scales of Anxiety, Atypicality, and Clinical Maladjustment, and at least 0.05 between OSU PTSDS-CF scales for Social Stress, Depression, Inadequacy, and Emotional Symptoms Index (ESI). Analyses of variance (ANOVAs) yielded significant differences at 0.01 between children with and without PTSD, based on OSU PTSDS-CF cut-off scores, for BASC-SRP Anxiety, Atypicality, and Clinical Maladjustment. ANOVAs were significant at 0.05 for Social Stress, Locus of Control, Relationship with Parents, and ESI. Results yielded moderate effect sizes, and BASC-SRP means were within normal limits for all groups. Practitioners are encouraged to supplement the BASC-SRP with PTSD measures in children who have experienced trauma. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Personality pathology, depression and HPA axis functioning

    HUMAN PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY: CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL, Issue 4 2001
    I. Schweitzer
    Abstract Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis functioning, as measured by the dexamethasone suppression test (DST), has been extensively investigated in major depressive disorder (MDD). Evaluating DST response in MDD patients while simultaneously considering clinically relevant personality disorders may further clarify the contribution of both personality pathology and HPA axis function to depressive symptoms. The present study measured personality pathology by administering the revised version of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-II) in a sample of 25 patients diagnosed with MDD. Analyses revealed that suppressors (n,=,19) scored significantly higher than non-suppressors (n,=,6) on six of the 13 MCMI-II personality disorder scales: Avoidant, Schizoid, Self-Defeating, Passive-Aggressive, Schizotypal and Borderline. Increased personality pathology was associated with normal suppression of cortisol following the DST. This suggests that suppression of the DST may be associated with depressive states linked with personality pathology while the more biologically based depression is associated with abnormal HPA pathophysiology. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]