Digital Libraries (digital + libraries)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


SIG/III International Paper Competition: Papers on Practical Collaborative Applications of Digital Libraries

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 4 2001
Irene L. Travis Editor
[source]


SIG/III International Paper Competition: Papers on Practical Collaborative Applications of Digital Libraries

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 3 2001
Irene L. Travis Editor
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Cultural Usability in Digital Libraries

BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 4 2000
Elke Duncker
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


The bibliometric properties of article readership information

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
Michael J. Kurtz
Digital libraries such as the NASA Astrophysics Data System (Kurtz et al., 2005) permit the easy accumulation of a new type of bibliometric measure, the number of electronic accesses ("reads") of individual articles. We explore various aspects of this new measure. We examine the obsolescence function as measured by actual reads and show that it can be well fit by the sum of four exponentials with very different time constants. We compare the obsolescence function as measured by readership with the obsolescence function as measured by citations. We find that the citation function is proportional to the sum of two of the components of the readership function. This proves that the normative theory of citation is true in the mean. We further examine in detail the similarities and differences among the citation rate, the readership rate, and the total citations for individual articles, and discuss some of the causes. Using the number of reads as a bibliometric measure for individuals, we introduce the read,cite diagram to provide a two-dimensional view of an individual's scientific productivity. We develop a simple model to account for an individual's reads and cites and use it to show that the position of a person in the read,cite diagram is a function of age, innate productivity, and work history. We show the age biases of both reads and cites and develop two new bibliometric measures which have substantially less age bias than citations: SumProd, a weighted sum of total citations and the readership rate, intended to show the total productivity of an individual; and Read10, the readership rate for articles published in the last 10 years, intended to show an individual's current productivity. We also discuss the effect of normalization (dividing by the number of authors on a paper) on these statistics. We apply SumProd and Read10 using new, nonparametric techniques to compare the quality of different astronomical research organizations. [source]


Reducing the information gap: Digital library development in Brazil

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2002
Cavan McCarthy
Principal Brazilian digital library initiatives were identified and characterized. Significant projects in the area of science and research include gateway sites for research (Prossiga), set up and maintained cooperatively, also a multinational access system for regional electronic journals (SciELO). Systems which offer access to texts of the Brazilian classics predominate in the field of literature and hmanities. Digital libraries have had a significant impact on Brazil. Government financing was critical for implanting these new services. Institutions which already have a strong background in advanced technology have significantly better chances of success in the digital library field. Cooperative projects have also had significant impact. [source]


Toward replication in grids for digital libraries with freshness and correctness guarantees

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 17 2008
Fuat Akal
Abstract Building digital libraries (DLs) on top of data grids while facilitating data access and minimizing access overheads is challenging. To achieve this, replication in a Grid has to provide dedicated features that are only partly supported by existing Grid environments. First, it must provide transparent and consistent access to distributed data. Second, it must dynamically control the creation and maintenance of replicas. Third, it should allow higher replication granularities, i.e. beyond individual files. Fourth, users should be able to specify their freshness demands, i.e. whether they need most recent data or are satisfied with slightly outdated data. Finally, all these tasks must be performed efficiently. This paper presents an approach that will finally allow one to build a fully integrated and self-managing replication subsystem for data grids that will provide all the above features. Our approach is to start with an accepted replication protocol for database clusters, namely PDBREP, and to adapt it to the grid. Copyright 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Applying aggregation operators for information access systems: An application in digital libraries

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, Issue 12 2008
Enrique Herrera-Viedma
Nowadays, the information access on the Web is a main problem in the computer science community. Any major advance in the field of information access on the Web requires the collaboration of different methodologies and research areas. In this paper, the concept of aggregation operator playing a role for information access on the Web is analyzed. We present some Web methodologies, as search engines, recommender systems, and Web quality evaluation models and analyze the way aggregation operators help toward the success of their activities. We also show an application of the aggregation operators in digital libraries. In particular, we introduce a Web information system to analyze the quality of digital libraries that implements an important panel of aggregation operators to obtain the quality assessments. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Modeling naturalistic argumentation in research literatures: Representation and interaction design issues

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS, Issue 1 2007
Simon J. Buckingham Shum
This article characterizes key weaknesses in the ability of current digital libraries to support scholarly inquiry, and as a way to address these, proposes computational services grounded in semiformal models of the naturalistic argumentation commonly found in research literatures. It is argued that a design priority is to balance formal expressiveness with usability, making it critical to coevolve the modeling scheme with appropriate user interfaces for argument construction and analysis. We specify the requirements for an argument modeling scheme for use by untrained researchers and describe the resulting ontology, contrasting it with other domain modeling and semantic web approaches, before discussing passive and intelligent user interfaces designed to support analysts in the construction, navigation, and analysis of scholarly argument structures in a Web-based environment. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Int Syst 22: 17,47, 2007. [source]


Resistance to change and the adoption of digital libraries: An integrative model

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 8 2009
Oded Nov
In this paper we extend earlier work on the role of the personality trait of resistance to change (RTC) in the adoption of digital libraries. We present an integrative study, drawing on a number of research streams, including IT adoption, social psychology, and digital-library acceptance. Using structural equation modeling, we confirm RTC as a direct antecedent of effort expectancy. In addition, we also find that by affecting computer anxiety and result demonstrability, RTC acts as an indirect antecedent to both effort expectancy and performance expectancy, which in turn determine user intention to adopt digital library technology. Implications for research and practice are discussed. [source]


Domain-independent automatic keyphrase indexing with small training sets

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 7 2008
Olena Medelyan
Keyphrases are widely used in both physical and digital libraries as a brief, but precise, summary of documents. They help organize material based on content, provide thematic access, represent search results, and assist with navigation. Manual assignment is expensive because trained human indexers must reach an understanding of the document and select appropriate descriptors according to defined cataloging rules. We propose a new method that enhances automatic keyphrase extraction by using semantic information about terms and phrases gleaned from a domain-specific thesaurus. The key advantage of the new approach is that it performs well with very little training data. We evaluate it on a large set of manually indexed documents in the domain of agriculture, compare its consistency with a group of six professional indexers, and explore its performance on smaller collections of documents in other domains and of French and Spanish documents. [source]


Design and usability of digital libraries: Case studies in the Asia Pacific

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2007
Judy P. Bolstad
[source]


Information retrieval design: Principles and options for information description, organization, display, and access in information retrieval databases, digital libraries, catalogs, and indexes

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 10 2006
Ryen W. White
[source]


Engineering a search engine (weblib) and browser (knowledge navigator) for digital libraries: global knowledge discovery tools exclusively for librarians and libraries on the web

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 14 2002
V. Sreenivasulu
[source]


State digital library usability: Contributing organizational factors

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 13 2002
Hong (Iris) Xie
Usage and user feedback about a state digital library, in which the developers/designers, content providers, different types of libraries and their staffs, and a variety of user groups represent a loose federation of separate organizations with diverse expectations and needs, are investigated. Through corroboratory evidence from usage statistics of Internet-based database services available through the digital library, responses to a statewide-administered library survey, and a Web-based survey of end users, the authors identify contributing factors for the organizational usability of state digital libraries. The authors refine and enhance an organizational usability model for the unique environment of state digital libraries and identify three modes of interaction (influence, communication, activity) and the challenges each interaction presents: in addressing diverse player needs and expectations; the unequal awareness and training in using state digital libraries; and the lack of sufficient communication channels among players. In addition, the findings highlight the double-edged impact of physical libraries on the state digital library. [source]


Figure and table retrieval from scholarly journal articles: User needs for teaching and research

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2007
Robert J. Sandusky
This paper discusses user needs for a system that indexes tables and figures culled from scientific journal articles. These findings are taken from a comprehensive investigation into scientists' satisfaction with and use of a tables and figures retrieval prototype. Much previous research has examined the usability and features of digital libraries and other online retrieval systems that retrieve either full-text of journal articles, traditional article-level abstracts, or both. In contrast, this paper examines the needs of users directly searching for and accessing discrete journal article components , figures, tables, graphs, maps, and photographs , that have been individually indexed. [source]


Trends in the use of digital libraries by scientists in 2000-2005: A case study of finelib

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2006
Pertti Vakkari
This study explores the trends in the use of electronic material and digital libraries by university faculty between the years 2000 and 2005. The data consist of nationwide web-based surveys of the end-users of FinELib, Finnish Electronic Library, at all Finnish universities. Although material provision has grown tremendously and consequently the use of electronic literature and of FinELib, the clients were polarizing into frequent and infrequent users. Perceived availability of the material provided was a major factor influencing this polarization. Availability was significantly stronger predictor of the use than users' discipline. It seems that availability underlies the disciplinary variation in the use of digital libraries. [source]


Designing digital information technologies for children.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2003
Sponsored by SIG USE
Developing digital information technologies appropriate for children can be challenging, particularly since young people have their own interests, abilities, curiosities, and information needs that can be continually changing. Young people are not "just short adults" but an entirely different user population with their own culture, norms and complexities. With the emergence of children as important consumers of digital information, their role in the design of new technologies has been maximized. The speakers will explore national and international digital libraries that have been designed for children using innovative applications of technologies. In addition, they will discuss challenges and issues in designing digital information for young people. [source]


From anytime, anywhere to all-the-time, everywhere: Learning objects, broadband and wireless reshape digital libraries for learning and research.

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY (ELECTRONIC), Issue 1 2003
Sponsored by SIG STI
Learning objects are among the latest types of materials to be included in digital libraries. These are small portions of lesson material designed to be used in multiple configurations for multiple instructional applications, ranging from distance learning to interactive simulation. As broadband and wireless technologies change the expectations and performance patterns of the user, learning objects change the nature of content and the way that it must be managed. The size and diversity of digital collections affect the options through which these materials can be accessed. Many libraries are offering wireless access to their networks and many individuals are accessing digital libraries off-site using broadband technologies. Each of these trends affects decisions made for collection development, portal design and network design, and those decisions dictate specific technological requirements for access. This panel session highlights management and infrastructure issues of digital libraries as they relate to learning objects, broadband and wireless technologies. [source]