Developmental Neuroscience (developmental + neuroscience)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Cerebral palsy: towards developmental neuroscience

DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE & CHILD NEUROLOGY, Issue 7 2005
Ingeborg Krägeloh-Mann
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Brain, mind, and dyadic change processes

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2006
Robert J. Neborsky
For many individuals attachment trauma is at the core of psychoneurosis and personality disorder. Combining theoretical aspects of psychodynamic therapy, developmental neuroscience, and attachment styles provides a useful framework for intensifying emotion and accelerating the course of treatment. A bihemispheric model is considered. The model addresses the challenge in treating the implicit trauma, which resides in the right hemisphere. This is achieved without resorting to interpretation, which is largely a left hemispheric process. The article presents a patient who benefits from a brief emotionally based psychotherapy that was completed after a course of a 20-year psychoanalysis. © 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 62: 523,538, 2006. [source]


The future of psychotherapy for mentally ill children and adolescents

THE JOURNAL OF CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY AND ALLIED DISCIPLINES, Issue 1-2 2009
John S. March
Objective:, Given striking advances in translational developmental neuroscience and its convergence with developmental psychopathology and developmental epidemiology, it is now clear that mental illnesses are best thought of as neurodevelopmental disorders. This simple fact has enormous implications for the nature and organization of psychotherapy for mentally ill children, adolescents and adults. Method:, This article reviews the ,trajectory' of psychosocial interventions in pediatric psychiatry, and makes some general predictions about where this field is heading over the next several decades. Results:, Driven largely by scientific advances in molecular, cellular and systems neuroscience, psychotherapy in the future will focus less on personal narratives and more on the developing brain. In place of disorders as intervention targets, modularized psychosocial treatment components derived from current cognitive-behavior therapies will target corresponding central nervous system (CNS) information processes and their functional behavioral consequences. Either preventive or rehabilitative, the goal of psychotherapy will be to promote development along typical developmental trajectories. In place of guilds, psychotherapy will be organized professionally much as physical therapy is organized today. As with other forms of increasingly personalized health care, internet-based delivery of psychotherapy will become commonplace. Conclusion:, Informed by the new field of translational developmental neuroscience, psychotherapy in the future will take aim at the developing brain in a service delivery model that closely resembles the place and role of psychosocial interventions in the rest of medicine. Getting there will be, as they say, interesting. [source]


THE ANALYTIC RELATIONSHIP: INTEGRATING JUNGIAN, ATTACHMENT THEORY AND DEVELOPMENTAL PERSPECTIVES

BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 1 2009
Jean Knox
abstract This paper highlights some key features of a Jungian approach to transference and countertransference and suggests that a Jungian model has crucial aspects in common with contemporary views in attachment theory on the nature of the analytic relationship. The analytic relationship is examined in terms of the fundamental processes of psychic development described in attachment theory and affective neuroscience, namely affect regulation and development of reflective function and of self-agency. The relative value of three analytic techniques, those of interpretation, new relational experience and regression, are discussed in relation to these processes. I suggest that each of the traditional psychoanalytic and Jungian analytic models concentrates on differing aspects of these psychic processes and analytic techniques. I construct a grid to illustrate this and to demonstrate how attachment theory and developmental neuroscience offer a theoretical basis on which we can develop an integrated model of the nature of the analytic relationship and tasks. [source]