Design Education (design + education)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Importance of Conceptual and Concrete Modelling in Architectural Design Education

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 1 2009
Aysu Akalin
The design studio is the heart of architectural education. It is where future architects are moulded and the main forum for creative exploration, interaction and assimilation. This article argues for a ,studio-based learning' approach in terms of the impact of design tools, especially sketching and concrete modelling, on the creativity or problem-solving capabilities of a student. The implementation of a ,vertical design studio' model at Gazi University Department of Architecture is reported with examples of students' works. [source]


A Conceptualisation of Emotion within Art and Design Education: A Creative, Learning and Product-Orientated Triadic Schema

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2007
David Spendlove
There is a resurgence of interest in the powerful concept of emotion in current educational policy and practice. This article calls for the recognition and conceptualisation of a triadic schema for theorising the location of emotion within a creative educational experience. The schema represents emotion within three domains within current practice: Person, Process and Product. The principal focus of the article is pupils aged 5-16 and consideration is given to the application of the conceptualised schema within art and design education as represented by the national curriculum statement of importance. The central hypothesis of the work is that greater recognition of an emotional dimension within a triadic schema - developing emotional capacity in students to engage in a creative process (person); stimulating emotional engagement through appropriate learning contexts (process) and facilitating the emotional interfacing with outcomes (product) - will help conceptualise the powerful interrelationship between emotion, creativity and learning. Based upon an extensive synthesised literature review a schema, developed through abductive reasoning and grounded theory, ultimately conceptualises the overarching theme of emotion within a creative, learning and product-orientated experience within the primary and secondary stages of England's education system. [source]


Bauhaus Hausfraus: Gender Formation In Design Education

JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION, Issue 2 2001
Katerina Redi Ray
This essay examines the crisis of masculinity at the Bauhaus and links it to a broader crisis in patriarchy after the First World War. Bauhaus reminiscences and depictions of Bauhaus students and buildings in the catalog of the 1938 MoMA Bauhaus exhibition show a re-enactment of war trauma in Bauhaus theatre and festivals. These and other experiments led to radical and subsequently conservative revisions of masculine identity. The paper suggests that the construction of a new disciplinary identity through institutional and media reproduction rather than its economically limited innovations in mass production forms the real legacy of the Bauhaus for the twentieth century. The essay draws heavily on personal statements by Bauhaus students and masters, and juxtaposes these with theoretical analyses of masculine formation. This technique at least in part allows for the theorists and historical subjects to speak for themselves. [source]


Interior Design Education in the 21st Century: An Educational Transformation

JOURNAL OF INTERIOR DESIGN, Issue 2 2004
Denise A. Guerin Ph.D.
PREAMBLE We propose that the time is right to consider a transformation of Interior Design education. As Interior Design educators, administrators, practitioners, and leaders, we have been active participants in the progress made by the profession and the evolution of Interior Design education. With this in mind, and ever conscious of our continued commitment to the future of Interior Design, we present this treatise for consideration. [source]


The Work of Art in the Age of Digital Reproduction: The Significance of the Creative Industries

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2001
Mark Blythe
This paper reflects on the social and political significance of the new classification of the ,creative industries'. The new aggregate expands previous classifications of the arts and cultural industries and produces figures which suggest that these sectors are increasingly vital elements of the UK economy. It is argued that these statistics on the creative industries are, to an extent, misleading. The paper considers some of the implications of the recent and continuing advances in technologies of digital reproduction and distribution. The importance of the creative industries to Arts and Design education is placed within the context of the emphasis on vocationalism by successive UK governments. It is suggested that while the new aggregate may be useful in terms of certain kinds of promotion, the category should be recognised as arbitrary and politically motivated. Finally, the paper examines the notion that the creative industries might be harnessed to achieve social inclusion and urban re-generation and reflects on some of the social costs of such sectors. [source]


Interior Design Education in the 21st Century: An Educational Transformation

JOURNAL OF INTERIOR DESIGN, Issue 2 2004
Denise A. Guerin Ph.D.
PREAMBLE We propose that the time is right to consider a transformation of Interior Design education. As Interior Design educators, administrators, practitioners, and leaders, we have been active participants in the progress made by the profession and the evolution of Interior Design education. With this in mind, and ever conscious of our continued commitment to the future of Interior Design, we present this treatise for consideration. [source]


A comparative study of 3D scanning in engineering, product and transport design and fashion design education

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION, Issue 3 2009
A. Kus
Abstract The aim of this paper is to evaluate the use of three-dimensional (3D) scanning technologies for design and engineering courses. This paper will provide a comparative discussion of the current 3D scanning technologies; and then describes three experimental studies in engineering, transport design and fashion design. Using 3D scanner technology the experiments tested the transferral of a variety of different data from scanned organic 3D shapes to 3D CAD packages for learning and teaching in undergraduate education. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Comput Appl Eng Educ 17: 263,271, 2009; Published online in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com); DOI 10.1002/cae.20213 [source]


Old World Teaching Meets the New Digital Cultural Creatives

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 3 2009
Elizabeth Delacruz
This article sets forth a conceptual, philosophical and social agenda for art and design education in the twenty-first century, considering how a set of beliefs articulated within US art education discourse interfaces with conceptualisations about emerging global digital media and technologies. Discussion highlights selected writings in the USA primarily, writings about art education technology orientations; and then describes the professional experiences and insights of the writer as she embraced, implemented and made sense of technology in terms of her own multicultural educational orientation in a US university. Based on these insights, this writer proposes that technology pedagogy is not actually about digital technologies per se, but about what we intend to do with new technologies in the twenty-first century. Old notions of art as an embodiment of things that matter and a testament to the human condition are now connected to contemporary ideas about citizenship, caring and public engagement. In this trajectory, citizenship education is then posed as central to a future vision of art education in the digitally connected classroom. Caveats and limitations of the educational and transformative power of new global electronic media being set forth in this article are also noted, including paradoxical self-contradictions within the orientation itself. [source]


Supporting Pupils with Dyspraxia in the Visual Arts Does Drawing from Observation Function as an Official and Discriminatory Discourse?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2007
Claire Penketh
This article examines the demands that pupils with dyspraxia may face when engaging with the secondary art and design curriculum in a mainstream secondary school. It explores the possibility that there is an exclusive approach to art and design, prioritising a formalist approach to the teaching of specific skills and mastery of techniques, and considers the implications that this may have for such pupils. Specific attention is paid to the role of observational drawing and the demands that this may make for pupils with dyspraxia. The article will explore existing guidance offered for subject-based practitioners and aims to contextualise this within the current debates on art and design education and the recollections of individual experiences of art and design. It will outline the hypothesis that pupils with dyspraxia may be one group of pupils amongst many for whom their art and design experience does not offer an inclusive experience, and it seeks to question the existence of a hierarchy of practice and its subsequent relevance. [source]


A Conceptualisation of Emotion within Art and Design Education: A Creative, Learning and Product-Orientated Triadic Schema

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2007
David Spendlove
There is a resurgence of interest in the powerful concept of emotion in current educational policy and practice. This article calls for the recognition and conceptualisation of a triadic schema for theorising the location of emotion within a creative educational experience. The schema represents emotion within three domains within current practice: Person, Process and Product. The principal focus of the article is pupils aged 5-16 and consideration is given to the application of the conceptualised schema within art and design education as represented by the national curriculum statement of importance. The central hypothesis of the work is that greater recognition of an emotional dimension within a triadic schema - developing emotional capacity in students to engage in a creative process (person); stimulating emotional engagement through appropriate learning contexts (process) and facilitating the emotional interfacing with outcomes (product) - will help conceptualise the powerful interrelationship between emotion, creativity and learning. Based upon an extensive synthesised literature review a schema, developed through abductive reasoning and grounded theory, ultimately conceptualises the overarching theme of emotion within a creative, learning and product-orientated experience within the primary and secondary stages of England's education system. [source]


Drawing in Perspective: Scottish Art and Design Teachers Discuss Drawing

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2005
Glen Coutts
What are the main purposes of drawing in the secondary art and design curriculum? What are Scottish art teachers' views on the role and function of drawing? How is drawing taught in Scottish schools? These three broad questions formed the basis of the research reported in this article. The small-scale study, carried out between June 2002 and June 2004 will, the authors hope, be of interest to art educators seeking to explore the teaching of drawing as a key component of art and design education. In this article, we report on the background to the study, the place of drawing in Scottish art education, the methodology used, discuss some of the respondents' comments and conclude with some reflections and thoughts for future study. [source]


On Primary Matters, Because Primary Matters

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 3 2003
Raywen Ford
The list of achievements of NSEAD is significant, but this paper suggests that the lack of primary membership, standing at 4% at the time of writing, is a loss to both the Society, and the primary sector. In order to meets its objects as written in the constitution, the Society needs to represent art, craft and design education in all sectors. The paper underlines the value of education in art and design in the primary sector, and suggests that misunderstandings that exist about the nature of and importance on the activity of young children, particularly in relation to play, are indeed misunderstandings and need to be addressed. [source]


Young People, Photography and Engagement

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 2 2003
Nick Stanley
Over ten years research into photography and education has been undertaken at Birmingham Institute of Art and Design in collaboration with the Arts Council of England, West Midlands Arts, and local community photography agencies. A range of case studies were undertaken to explore how young people used photography, particularly in self-empowerment. These ranged from students in Further Education challenging concepts of visual stereotypes of disability, young lesbian, gay and bisexual people constructing their own website, and individuals and groups creating and modifying their own images in a shopping centre. A democratic action research methodology was developed to enable the young people to establish their own agenda and generate standards for evaluating their work. A particular feature of the later research was a self-reflective journal that was shared between the researcher and everyone engaged in the project. This resource has considerable potential in photography and elsewhere in art and design education. [source]


Towards a New Art Curriculum: Reflections on Pot Fillers and Fire Lighters

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ART & DESIGN EDUCATION, Issue 1 2000
Gordon Bell
This contribution is derived from an address presented to the NSEAD Annual Conference (1999),Towards a New Arts Education' in association with Bretton Hall, a specialist institution for the arts and education, to mark the 50th anniversary of its Foundation in September 1949. [1] An analysis of the role of art and design education is set in the context of an arts related curriculum and the case for an interdependent, teachable and accessible programme is outlined. Proposals for the maintenance and development of a future for arts education is tested against certain key questions and a theory of ,good teaching' in the arts [source]


The Identity of Place in Virtual Design Studios

JOURNAL OF ARCHITECTURAL EDUCATION, Issue 1 2002
TADEJA ZUPANCIC STROJAN
Since independence in 1991, Slovenian society has sought models for education in the West. As in Slovenia, schools of architecture situated in other countries of rapid social transformation are offered the opportunity to critically review examples of the virtual design studio (VDS). This article investigates such examples within the concepts of "identity" and "place." These concepts are developed to include a consideration of the identity of virtual places and virtual studios and to examine the implications of globalization on architectural education. In conclusion, we develop an exploratory model for VDS as an instrument that integrates computer technology, distance learning, and design education. [source]


Empirical Design Research: Student Definitions, Perceptions, and Values

JOURNAL OF INTERIOR DESIGN, Issue 2 2007
Joan I. Dickinson Ph.D.
ABSTRACT Third and fourth year undergraduate interior design students in Colleges of Architecture or Human Sciences at three different research universities were surveyed to compare their: (1) perceived value of research in interior design practice, (2) perceptions of who should conduct research, (3) attitudes toward research in interior design education, and (4) definitions of research. A survey instrument was developed that consisted of one open-ended question and 29 questions using a Likert scale. Questions were adapted from the Chenoweth and Chidister (1983) scale that measured landscape architecture attitudes toward research, and from the Dickson and White (1993) scale administered to interior design practicing professionals. A total of 89 undergraduate students were surveyed from the three universities. The majority of the students were Caucasian (n = 79) and female (n = 84). The results indicated that, overall, students valued research for the profession regardless of their college or university affiliation. However, their definitions of research were pragmatic in nature, and they often regarded research as the gathering of information rather than the generation of new knowledge. The students were also unclear about who should be conducting interior design research. College affiliation revealed that students who were in an architecturally-based program put a higher value on research at the undergraduate level than those students housed in a College of Human Sciences; similarly, College of Architecture students had a better understanding that research advanced a profession. [source]


Project management in instructional design: ADDIE is not enough

BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, Issue 5 2010
Shahron Williams Van Rooij
In the digital age, instructional designers must possess both a sound instructional design knowledge base and solid project management skills that will enable them to complete courseware projects on time, on budget and in conformance with client expectations. Project management skills include the ability to apply repeatable processes, along with interpersonal skills such as communication and leadership skills. However, courses in project management are often absent from the higher education instructional design curriculum, creating a gap between what is learned in instructional design programmes and real-world practice. In this paper, the author draws on the education and project management fields to examine this gap. The author argues that the gap between instructional design project management models and how instructional design practitioners view project management is a consequence of the divergent perspectives of higher education subcultures and the extent to which those subcultures are likely to embrace cross-disciplinary subjects such as project management. The author proposes some research and advocacy opportunities for closing the gap between instructional design education and practice. [source]