Depression Care (depression + care)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Association Between Rural Residence and the Use, Type, and Quality of Depression Care

THE JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 3 2010
John C. Fortney PhD
Abstract Objective: To assess the association between rurality and depression care. Methods: Data were extracted for 10,319 individuals with self-reported depression in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pharmacotherapy was defined as an antidepressant prescription fill, and minimally adequate pharmacotherapy was defined as receipt of at least 4 antidepressant fills. Psychotherapy was defined as an outpatient counseling visit, and minimally adequate psychotherapy was defined as , 8 visits. Rurality was defined using Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and Rural Urban Continuum Codes (RUCCs). Results: Over the year, 65.1% received depression treatment, including 58.8% with at least 1 antidepressant prescription fill and 24.5% with at least 1 psychotherapy visit. Among those in treatment, 56.2% had minimally adequate pharmacotherapy treatment and 36.3% had minimally adequate psychotherapy treatment. Overall, there were no significant rural-urban differences in receipt of any type of formal depression treatment. However, rural residence was associated with significantly higher odds of receiving pharmacotherapy (MSA: OR 1.16 [95% CI, 1.01-1.34; P= .04] and RUCC: OR 1.04 [95% CI, 1.00-1.08; P= .05]), and significantly lower odds of receiving psychotherapy (MSA: OR 0.62 [95% CI, 0.53-0.74; P < .01] and RUCC: OR 0.91 [95% CI, 0.88-0.94; P < .001]). Rural residence was not significantly associated with the adequacy of pharmacotherapy, but it was significantly associated with the adequacy of psychotherapy (MSA: OR 0.53 [95% CI, 0.41-0.69; P < .01] and RUCC: OR 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86-0.99; P= .02]). Psychiatrists per capita were a mediator in the psychotherapy analyses. Conclusions: Rural individuals are more reliant on pharmacotherapy than psychotherapy. This may be a concern if individuals in rural areas turn to pharmacotherapy because psychotherapists are unavailable rather than because they have a preference for pharmacotherapy. [source]


Treatment of Depression Improves Physical Functioning in Older Adults

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 3 2005
Christopher M. Callahan MD
Objectives: To determine the effect of collaborative care management for depression on physical functioning in older adults. Design: Multisite randomized clinical trial. Setting: Eighteen primary care clinics from eight healthcare organizations. Participants: One thousand eight hundred one patients aged 60 and older with major depressive disorder. Intervention: Patients were randomized to the Improving Mood: Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment (IMPACT) intervention (n=906) or to a control group receiving usual care (n=895). Control patients had access to all health services available as part of usual care. Intervention patients had access for 12 months to a depression clinical specialist who coordinated depression care with their primary care physician. Measurements: The 12-item short form Physical Component Summary (PCS) score (range 0,100) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) (range 0,7). Results: The mean patient age was 71.2, 65% were women, and 77% were white. At baseline, the mean PCS was 40.2, and the mean number of IADL dependencies was 0.7; 45% of participants rated their health as fair or poor. Intervention patients experienced significantly better physical functioning at 1 year than usual-care patients as measured using between-group differences on the PCS of 1.71 (95% confidence interval (CI)=0.96,2.46) and IADLs of ,0.15 (95% CI=,0.29 to ,0.01). Intervention patients were also less likely to rate their health as fair or poor (37.3% vs 52.4%, P<.001). Combining both study groups, patients whose depression improved were more likely to experience improvement in physical functioning. Conclusion: The IMPACT collaborative care model for late-life depression improves physical function more than usual care. [source]


Depression Treatment in a Sample of 1,801 Depressed Older Adults in Primary Care

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 4 2003
Jürgen Unützer MD
OBJECTIVES: To examine rates and predictors of lifetime and recent depression treatment in a sample of 1,801 depressed older primary care patients DESIGN: Cross sectional survey data collected from 1999 to 2001 as part of a treatment effectiveness trial. SETTING: Eighteen primary care clinics belonging to eight organizations in five states. PARTICIPANTS: One thousand eight hundred one clinic users aged 60 and older who met diagnostic criteria for major depression or dysthymia. MEASUREMENTS: Lifetime depression treatment was defined as ever having received a prescription medication, counseling, or psychotherapy for depression. Potentially effective recent depression treatment was defined as 2 or more months of antidepressant medications or four or more sessions of counseling or psychotherapy for depression in the past 3 months. RESULTS: The mean age ± standard deviation was 71.2 ± 7.5; 65% of subjects were women. Twenty-three percent of the sample came from ethnic minority groups (12% were African American, 8% were Latino, and 3% belonged to other ethnic minorities). The median household income was $23,000. Most study participants (83%) reported depressive symptoms for 2 or more years, and most (71%) reported two or more prior depressive episodes. About 65% reported any lifetime depression treatment, and 46% reported some depression treatment in the past 3 months, although only 29% reported potentially effective recent depression treatment. Most of the treatment provided consisted of antidepressant medications, with newer antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors constituting the majority (78%) of antidepressants used. Most participants indicated a preference for counseling or psychotherapy over antidepressant medications, but only 8% had received such treatment in the past 3 months, and only 1% reported four or more sessions of counseling. Men, African Americans, Latinos, those without two or more prior episodes of depression, and those who preferred counseling to antidepressant medications reported significantly lower rates of depression care. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that there is considerable opportunity to improve care for older adults with depression. Particular efforts should be focused on improving access to depression care for older men, African Americans, Latinos, and patients who prefer treatments other than antidepressants. [source]


Using the chronic care model to tackle depression among older adults who have long-term physical conditions

JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRIC & MENTAL HEALTH NURSING, Issue 3 2007
P. MCEVOY phd bsc
Effective psychological and pharmacological treatments are available, but for depressed older adults with long-term physical conditions, the outcome of routine care is generally poor. This paper introduces the chronic care model, a systemic approach to quality improvement and service redesign, which was developed by Ed Wagner and colleagues. The model highlights six key areas that need to be addressed, if depression is to be tackled more effectively in this neglected patient group: delivery system design, patient,provider relationships, decision support, clinical information systems, community resources and healthcare organization. Three influential programmes, the Improving Mood Promoting Access to Collaborative Treatment programme, the Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly Collaborative Trial, and the Program to Encourage Active, and Rewarding Lives for Seniors, have shown that when the model is adopted, significant improvements in outcomes can be achieved. The paper concludes with a case study, which illustrates the difference that adopting the chronic care model can make. Radical changes in working practices may be required, to implement the model in practice. However, Greg Simon, a leading researcher in the field of depression care, has suggested that there is already sufficient evidence to justify a shift in emphasis from research towards dissemination and implementation. [source]


Current practices in depression care

THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS, Issue S1 2007
Albert Yeung MD
Abstract Despite improved awareness among the medical community concerning common mental health disorders, the high prevalence of depression in the United States remains unchanged1 and has been compounded by increasing evidence of gaps in mental health care for ethnic and racial minorities.1,2 Thus, there is a strong need for the timely creation of comprehensive educational initiatives aimed at improving the quality of care provided by mental health professionals and primary care physicians. Fundamental to this process is the examination of current treatment standards, as well as identification of practices that require improved physician education. Consistent use of appropriate screening tools, diagnostic accuracy and timeliness, continual assessment of illness severity, adherence to practice guidelines, and individualized patient care need heightened attention to improve outcomes. This article describes the most prevalent types of depression and summarizes current practices in depression care, with an emphasis on treatment standards and opportunities for improved performance. [source]


Perspectives on disparities in depression care

THE JOURNAL OF CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS, Issue S1 2007
Robert E. Kristofco MSW
Abstract Depression is a major public health problem and a leading cause of disability worldwide. Compounding the high rates of morbidity and mortality and treatment challenges associated with depression are the tremendous disparities in quality of mental health care that exist between the majority of the population and those of racial and ethnic minorities. Although more study data are available on depression care for African Americans than for other groups, racial and ethnic minorities overall are less likely than whites to receive an accurate diagnosis, to receive care according to evidence-based guidelines, and to receive an antidepressant upon diagnosis. Multiple factors contribute to these disparities, among them socioeconomic and cultural issues and prejudices among patients and health care providers. Closing the gap that exists between what depression care is and what depression care could be begins with clinicians' recognizing the relevance of culture to care. Opportunities exist within the broader context of medical education, including continuing medical education (CME), to prepare health care professionals to address the myriad issues related to managing depression. [source]


The Association Between Rural Residence and the Use, Type, and Quality of Depression Care

THE JOURNAL OF RURAL HEALTH, Issue 3 2010
John C. Fortney PhD
Abstract Objective: To assess the association between rurality and depression care. Methods: Data were extracted for 10,319 individuals with self-reported depression in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Pharmacotherapy was defined as an antidepressant prescription fill, and minimally adequate pharmacotherapy was defined as receipt of at least 4 antidepressant fills. Psychotherapy was defined as an outpatient counseling visit, and minimally adequate psychotherapy was defined as , 8 visits. Rurality was defined using Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) and Rural Urban Continuum Codes (RUCCs). Results: Over the year, 65.1% received depression treatment, including 58.8% with at least 1 antidepressant prescription fill and 24.5% with at least 1 psychotherapy visit. Among those in treatment, 56.2% had minimally adequate pharmacotherapy treatment and 36.3% had minimally adequate psychotherapy treatment. Overall, there were no significant rural-urban differences in receipt of any type of formal depression treatment. However, rural residence was associated with significantly higher odds of receiving pharmacotherapy (MSA: OR 1.16 [95% CI, 1.01-1.34; P= .04] and RUCC: OR 1.04 [95% CI, 1.00-1.08; P= .05]), and significantly lower odds of receiving psychotherapy (MSA: OR 0.62 [95% CI, 0.53-0.74; P < .01] and RUCC: OR 0.91 [95% CI, 0.88-0.94; P < .001]). Rural residence was not significantly associated with the adequacy of pharmacotherapy, but it was significantly associated with the adequacy of psychotherapy (MSA: OR 0.53 [95% CI, 0.41-0.69; P < .01] and RUCC: OR 0.92 [95% CI, 0.86-0.99; P= .02]). Psychiatrists per capita were a mediator in the psychotherapy analyses. Conclusions: Rural individuals are more reliant on pharmacotherapy than psychotherapy. This may be a concern if individuals in rural areas turn to pharmacotherapy because psychotherapists are unavailable rather than because they have a preference for pharmacotherapy. [source]