Dental Public Health (dental + public_health)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


An Assessment of the Dental Public Health Infrastructure in the United States

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2006
Scott L. Tomar DMD
Abstract Objectives: The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research commissioned an assessment of the dental public health infrastructure in the United States as a first step toward ensuring its adequacy. This study examined several elements of the US dental public health infrastructure in government, education, workforce, and regulatory issues, focused primarily at the state level. Methods: Data were drawn from a wide range of sources, including original surveys, analysis of existing databases, and compilation of publicly available information. Results: In 2002, 72.5% of states had a full-time dental director and 65% of state dental programs had total budgets of $1 million or less. Among U.S. dental schools, 68% had a dental public health academic unit. Twelve and a half percent of dental schools and 64.3% of dental hygiene programs had no faculty member with a public health degree. Among schools of public health, 15% offered a graduate degree in a dental public health concentration area, and 60% had no faculty member with a dental or dental hygiene degree. There were 141 active diplomates of the American Board of Dental Public Health as of February 2001; 15% worked for state, county, or local governments. In May 2003, there were 640 US members of the American Association of Public Health Dentistry with few members in most states. In 2002, 544 American Dental Association members reported their specialty as Dental Public Health, which ranged from 0 in five states to 41 in California. Just two states had a public health dentist on their dental licensing boards. Conclusions: Findings suggest the US dental public health workforce is small, most state programs have scant funding, the field has minimal presence in academia, and dental public health has little role in the regulation of dentistry and dental hygiene. Successful efforts to enhance the many aspects of the US dental public health infrastructure will require substantial collaboration among many diverse partners. [source]


AAPHD 2005 Leverett Graduate Student Merit Award for Outstanding Achievement in Dental Public Health

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2005
Article first published online: 6 AUG 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


AAPHD 2005 Predoctoral Dental Student Merit Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Dental Public Health

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2005
Article first published online: 6 AUG 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


AAPHD 2002 Leverett Graduate Student Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Dental Public Health

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 4 2002
Article first published online: 1 MAY 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Response to the JPHD's Guest Editorial: Qualitative Research,Does It Have a Place in Dental Public Health?

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2 2001
Piya Siriphant DDS
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


1999 Leverett Graduate Student Merit Awards for Outstanding Achievement in Dental Public Health

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2 2000
Article first published online: 1 MAY 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Qualitative Research,Does It Have a Place in Dental Public Health?

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2000
Anthony S. Blinkhorn BDS, FDSRCS
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


The 8th Annual Conference of the European Association of Dental Public Health (EADPH e.V.) 21st to 23rd August, 2003, Jyväskylä, Finland

COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 1 2003
Article first published online: 24 JAN 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Undergraduate and postgraduate dental students',reflection on learning': a qualitative study

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF DENTAL EDUCATION, Issue 1 2006
F. A. Ashley
Abstract, The aim of this study was to explore undergraduate and postgraduate dental students' understanding of a good learning experience by using ,reflection on learning' as described by Schon. Four groups of Year 4 BDS students and one group of postgraduate students in dental public health took part in a series of focus group discussions. The responses were grouped into four broad themes (a) active, practical and positive learning; (b) interactive/together learning; (c) personal learning; (d) theory into practice. Six educational models of good learning proposed by the students are described. [source]


An Assessment of the Dental Public Health Infrastructure in the United States

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 1 2006
Scott L. Tomar DMD
Abstract Objectives: The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research commissioned an assessment of the dental public health infrastructure in the United States as a first step toward ensuring its adequacy. This study examined several elements of the US dental public health infrastructure in government, education, workforce, and regulatory issues, focused primarily at the state level. Methods: Data were drawn from a wide range of sources, including original surveys, analysis of existing databases, and compilation of publicly available information. Results: In 2002, 72.5% of states had a full-time dental director and 65% of state dental programs had total budgets of $1 million or less. Among U.S. dental schools, 68% had a dental public health academic unit. Twelve and a half percent of dental schools and 64.3% of dental hygiene programs had no faculty member with a public health degree. Among schools of public health, 15% offered a graduate degree in a dental public health concentration area, and 60% had no faculty member with a dental or dental hygiene degree. There were 141 active diplomates of the American Board of Dental Public Health as of February 2001; 15% worked for state, county, or local governments. In May 2003, there were 640 US members of the American Association of Public Health Dentistry with few members in most states. In 2002, 544 American Dental Association members reported their specialty as Dental Public Health, which ranged from 0 in five states to 41 in California. Just two states had a public health dentist on their dental licensing boards. Conclusions: Findings suggest the US dental public health workforce is small, most state programs have scant funding, the field has minimal presence in academia, and dental public health has little role in the regulation of dentistry and dental hygiene. Successful efforts to enhance the many aspects of the US dental public health infrastructure will require substantial collaboration among many diverse partners. [source]


Concepts of risk in dental public health

COMMUNITY DENTISTRY AND ORAL EPIDEMIOLOGY, Issue 4 2005
Brian A. Burt
Abstract , The purpose of this paper is to review the concepts of risk as we use them today in dental public health practice, and to suggest that we should broaden our view of risk. Use of terms like risk factor in the literature can be quite vague, and it is recommended that a clear definition of that and related terms be adhered to. A broader view of risk in dental research would take in the concepts of social determinants of health and population health. While some progress has been made in our understanding of these issues, better knowledge would give the public health administrator more readily available information to use in program planning. The skewed distribution of caries in the high-income countries has led to the emergence of targeted prevention programs toward those considered to be at high risk. In public health programs, targeting at the individual level is not practical: the risk assessment methods are not yet sufficiently precise, and even when individuals are identified there are practical problems with schools and with the children themselves. (For private practice, however, high-risk child patients can be identified as those with at least one approximal lesion in permanent teeth.) For public health purposes, an argument is made for geographic targeting, i.e. identification of areas of social deprivation where whole schools or school districts can be targeted. Geographic targeting is something between individual targeting and whole-population approaches. Ideally, geographic targeting would supplement population measures like water fluoridation and dental health education. Examples of geographic targeting from Ohio and New York are presented as illustrations. [source]