Darkroom Disease (darkroom + disease)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Work-attributed symptom clusters (darkroom disease) among radiographers versus physiotherapists: Associations between self-reported exposures and psychosocial stressors

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 6 2004
FRCPC, Susan M. Tarlo MB
Abstract Background "Darkroom disease" (DRD) has been used to describe unexplained multiple symptoms attributed by radiographers to their work environment. This study determines the prevalence of symptom clusters similar to other unexplained syndromes among (medical radiation technologists (MRTs) as compared with physiotherapists (PTs), and identifies associated work-related (WR) factors. Methods A mail survey was undertaken of members of the professional associations of MRTs and PTs in Ontario, Canada. Questions were included to determine the prevalence and frequency of symptom clusters including abnormal tiredness as well as WR headaches, and symptoms suggestive of eye, nasal, and throat irritation. For the purpose of this study, these are considered to be DRD symptom clusters. Individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma were excluded from our analyses. Results Overall, 63.9% of MRTs and 63.1% of PTs participated. Criteria for DRD were met by 7.8% of 1,483 MRTs and 1.8% of 1,545 PTs [odds ratio, OR 4.8 (confidence interval, CI 3.1,7.5); (P,<,0.0001)]. Both occupations showed significant associations between responses reflecting psychosocial stressors and DRD. Those with this symptom cluster were more likely to report additional symptoms than those without, and MRTs with DRD symptoms reported significantly more workplace chemical exposures. Conclusions Findings suggest excess symptoms consistent with DRD among MRTs versus PTs, and there were associations among those meeting our definition of DRD with self-reported irritant exposures and psychosocial stressors. Am. J. Ind. Med. 45:513,521, 2004. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Excess of symptoms among radiographers,

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 2 2003
Helen Dimich-Ward PhD
Abstract Background The prevalence and occupational determinants of miscellaneous symptoms referred to as "Darkroom disease" was compared between radiographers and physiotherapists working in British Columbia, Canada. Methods The participation rate for the mailout questionnaire survey was 66.1%. A small subset underwent spirometry and methacholine challenge testing. Results Radiographers had a higher prevalence of most symptoms, with an extreme odds ratio of 11.4 for chemical/metallic taste. The percentage of radiographers with non-specific bronchial hyperresponsiveness (NSBHR) was 3 times higher than that of physiotherapists, although the comparison was not statistically significant. Reporting inadequate ventilation, frequently detecting the odor of X-ray processing chemicals and cleaning up spills within the past 12 months were highly associated with most of the symptoms. Conclusions Our results suggest that differences in the prevalence of symptoms represent a complex process, both in exposure and response to the many constituents found in radiographic processing chemicals. Objective testing of health outcomes and more refined exposure measurements are recommended to further investigate occupational health problems of radiographers. Am. J. Ind. Med. 43: 132,141, 2003. 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Symptoms after mould exposure including Stachybotrys chartarum, and comparison with darkroom disease

ALLERGY, Issue 2 2010
M. Al-Ahmad
To cite this article: Al-Ahmad M, Manno M, Ng V, Ribeiro M, Liss GM, Tarlo SM. Symptoms after mould exposure including Stachybotrys chartarum, and comparison with darkroom disease. Allergy 2010; 65: 245,255. Abstract Background:, Mould-attributed symptoms have included features which overlap with unexplained syndromes such as sick building syndrome. Objectives:, We describe questionnaire and chart review findings in patients following exposure to moulds which include Stachybotrys and compare responses with two control groups. Methods:, Thirty-two patients presented with symptoms attributed to mould exposures. Exposure identification for 25 patients had reported S tachybotrys chartarum as well as other mould (Aspergillus, Penicillium), 88% at work. The remaining seven had professionally visualized or self-reported/photographic exposure evidence only. A chart review was performed and a follow-up with a questionnaire, including questions on current health status, and nonspecific symptoms. Results:, Cough, shortness of breath and chest tightness (at presentation) were reported in 79%, 70% and 64%, respectively, and persisted >6 weeks in 91%. Skin test(s) were positive to fungal extract(s) in 30%. Seventeen returned questionnaires were obtained 3.1 (SD 0.5) years after the initial clinic assessment. Among this subgroup, persisting asthma-like symptoms and symptoms suggestive of sick building syndrome were frequent, and similar to a group previously assessed for darkroom disease among medical radiation technologists. The mould-exposed group more commonly reported they were bothered when walking in a room with carpets, complained of a chemical or metallic taste in their mouth, and had problems in concentration when compared with a control physiotherapist group (P < 0.005). Conclusions:, Although only a minority with health concerns from indoor mould exposure had demonstrable mould-allergy, a significant proportion had asthma-like symptoms. Other symptoms were also common and persistent after the initial implicated exposure. [source]


Work-attributed symptom clusters (darkroom disease) among radiographers versus physiotherapists: Associations between self-reported exposures and psychosocial stressors

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 6 2004
FRCPC, Susan M. Tarlo MB
Abstract Background "Darkroom disease" (DRD) has been used to describe unexplained multiple symptoms attributed by radiographers to their work environment. This study determines the prevalence of symptom clusters similar to other unexplained syndromes among (medical radiation technologists (MRTs) as compared with physiotherapists (PTs), and identifies associated work-related (WR) factors. Methods A mail survey was undertaken of members of the professional associations of MRTs and PTs in Ontario, Canada. Questions were included to determine the prevalence and frequency of symptom clusters including abnormal tiredness as well as WR headaches, and symptoms suggestive of eye, nasal, and throat irritation. For the purpose of this study, these are considered to be DRD symptom clusters. Individuals with doctor-diagnosed asthma were excluded from our analyses. Results Overall, 63.9% of MRTs and 63.1% of PTs participated. Criteria for DRD were met by 7.8% of 1,483 MRTs and 1.8% of 1,545 PTs [odds ratio, OR 4.8 (confidence interval, CI 3.1,7.5); (P,<,0.0001)]. Both occupations showed significant associations between responses reflecting psychosocial stressors and DRD. Those with this symptom cluster were more likely to report additional symptoms than those without, and MRTs with DRD symptoms reported significantly more workplace chemical exposures. Conclusions Findings suggest excess symptoms consistent with DRD among MRTs versus PTs, and there were associations among those meeting our definition of DRD with self-reported irritant exposures and psychosocial stressors. Am. J. Ind. Med. 45:513,521, 2004. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]