Current Published Work (current + published_work)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Is right heart thromboemboli another indication for thrombolysis?

INTERNAL MEDICINE JOURNAL, Issue 5 2007
R. Agarwal
Abstract Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and a potentially life-threatening disease. Diagnosis is challenging because the signs and symptoms are non-specific. Moreover treatment of PE is shrouded in controversy. Even at presentation the role of thrombolysis in managing patients with PE remains unclear. In those patients with right heart thromboemboli, thrombolysis is usually suggested, but the evidence remains unclear. We report a 34-year-old man who was diagnosed with right heart thromboemboli on echocardiography and was successfully managed with thrombolysis and anticoagulation. We also review the current published work on the management of patients with right heart thromboemboli. [source]


Review article: Coronary artery stenoses: Detection and revascularization in renal disease

NEPHROLOGY, Issue 6 2009
HELEN L PILMORE
SUMMARY Cardiovascular events are markedly elevated in those with all degrees of renal impairment compared to the general population. There are well established guidelines in the general population for the management of coronary artery disease, however, similar guidelines have not been established in the renal population. This review examines the current published work on the detection of coronary artery stenoses in addition to summarizing the outcomes of revascularization in patients with kidney disease. Testing for coronary artery disease in the renal population most commonly occurs in dialysis patients as part of their assessment for renal transplantation. While a positive myocardial stress test for the detection of significant coronary artery stenoses is associated with an increased risk of cardiac events, there is no clear information currently showing that cardiovascular testing itself reduces the rate of adverse cardiac events after transplantation. Revascularization of coronary artery stenoses is associated with higher morbidity and mortality in all groups with kidney disease than in the general population, with the exception of renal transplant recipients where the mortality is likely to be similar to that of the general population. There appears to be a benefit in coronary artery bypass surgery compared to percutaneous intervention in those on dialysis and after renal transplant. Currently, there is little data to support coronary artery intervention prior to transplantation in those with asymptomatic coronary artery disease. [source]


NEUROLOGICAL DEFICIT AS A PRESENTATION OF OCCULT METASTATIC THYROID CARCINOMA

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 10 2006
Mark Izzard
Three cases of occult metastatic thyroid carcinoma presenting with neurological deficits are reviewed. In each case the patient's initial presentation was with symptoms of neurological deficiency secondary to a spinal cord compression. All patients received a combination of surgery, external beam radiotherapy and postoperative thyroxine treatment. Two of the three patients are alive and well, able to mobilize with minor neurological dysfunction. The diagnosis and management of the patients, as well as their outcomes are reviewed, with a discussion on further management issues alongside a review of the current published work. [source]


OUTCOMES OF A CONTEMPORARY AMPUTATION SERIES

ANZ JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Issue 5 2006
Tao S. Lim
Background: The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of a contemporary amputation series. Methods: A retrospective audit of 87 cases of major lower limb amputation from January 2000 to December 2002 from the Department of Vascular Surgery, Royal Perth Hospital, was conducted. Results: The mean age of the study population was 70.1 14.3 years; the male : female ratio was 3.35:1. Comorbid problems included diabetes (49.4%), smoking (81.6%), hypertension (77.0%), ischaemic heart disease (58.6%), stroke (25.3%), raised creatinine level (34.5%) and chronic airway limitation (25.3%). Preamputation vascular reconstructive procedures were common, 34.5% in a previous admission and 23.0% in the same admission. The main indication was critical limb ischaemia (75.9%) followed by diabetic infection (17.2%). There were 51 below-knee (58.6%), 5 through-knee (5.7%) and 31 above-knee (35.6%.) amputations. The below-knee amputation to above-knee amputation ratio was 1.65:1. The overall wound infection rate was 26.4%; the infection rates for below-knee (29.4%) and above-knee (22.6%) amputation did not differ significantly (P = 0.58). Revision rates were 17.6% for below-knee, 20% for through-knee and none for above-knee amputations. Twenty patients (23.0%) underwent subsequent contralateral amputation. Thirty-nine patients (44.8%) were selected as suitable for a prosthesis by a rehabilitation physician; 31 (79.5%) used the prosthesis both indoors and outdoors and 6 (15.4%) used it indoors only within 3 months. Cumulative mortality at 30 days, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months was 10.1, 28.7, 43.1 and 51.7%, respectively. Conclusion: This series agrees with the current published work in finding that patients undergoing major lower limb amputation are older, with a high prevalence of comorbid conditions. Successful prosthesis rehabilitation depends on patient selection and a multidisciplinary approach. Despite a low immediate mortality, the overall long-term results of lower limb amputation remain dismal. [source]