Cultural Barriers (cultural + barrier)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Cultural barriers in the education of cardiovascular disease patients in Iran

INTERNATIONAL NURSING REVIEW, Issue 3 2008
M.A. Farahani bscn
Background:, Cardiovascular diseases are responsible for the highest mortality rate in Iran; however, there is a lack of evidence for cultural factors influencing patient education. Such information is important for the provision of effective patient care. Aim:, To identify key issues relating to cultural factors influencing education of cardiovascular disease patients in Iran. Methods:, The qualitative research approach was used in this study, with open-ended interviews used to gather data. Eighteen nurses, four cardiovascular specialists, nine patients with cardiovascular disease and four family members were interviewed at two educational hospitals in Tehran. Interviews were taped, transcribed and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Findings:, Participants expressed a range of cultural factors influencing patient education. Five themes emerged from the analysis: (a) patients' lifestyle, (b) beliefs about disease and treatment, (c) concealment of true diagnosis, (d) different opinions regarding the preferred instructor, and (e) ineffective communication. Conclusion:, Findings show that cultural beliefs may act as risk factors for, or serve to intensify, cardiovascular disease. Consideration of these factors is essential for the success of patient education programmes. [source]


Cultural and practical barriers to seeking mental health treatment for Chinese Americans

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2004
Winnie W. KungArticle first published online: 11 DEC 200
Based on a sample of 1747 from the Chinese American Psychiatric Epidemiological Study, this report examined perceived barriers to mental health treatment. Two factors emerged, namely practical barriers, which included cost of treatment, time, knowledge of access, and language, and cultural barriers consisting of credibility of treatment, recognition of need, and fear of loss of face. Average ratings of all practical barrier items were higher than cultural barrier items, demonstrating the importance of pragmatic considerations for this population. In a novel attempt, this study examined the empirical link between these perceived barriers and actual mental health service use. The practical barrier factor showed significance in predicting service use for both the whole sample and a subsample of individuals with at least one lifetime mental disorder. Cultural barriers, however, did not attain significance. Practice and research implications of the findings are discussed. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comm Psychol 32: 27,43, 2004. [source]


Managing Diversity? ,Community Cohesion' and Its Limits in Neoliberal Urban Policy

GEOGRAPHY COMPASS (ELECTRONIC), Issue 2 2008
Julie MacLeavy
The concept of ,community cohesion' has played a defining role in the institution of a new policy agenda for regenerating urban areas in many liberal welfare states. Its particular interpretation supports the installation of urban programmes that are based not on the improvement of the built environment, but rather investment in the social and cultural composition of cities. In particular, the economic and civic participation of individuals living within deprived urban areas is positioned as a key means of redressing situations of inequality and disadvantage. This article reviews the concept of ,community cohesion', its use in urban policy in the UK, and the recent literature on this subject. Through an indicative discussion of the New Deal for Communities programme, it explores the potential implications of ,community cohesion' for disadvantaged policy subjects and considers especially its provisions for ethnic minority groups: a constellation of community in which individuals are understood to experience a ,double disadvantage' as a result of their disproportionate concentration in deprived urban areas, and their subjection to the consequences of racial discrimination (as well as language and cultural barriers). [source]


Promoting breast-feeding in a deprived area: the influence of a peer support initiative

HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 6 2003
Pamela Raine PhD
Abstract The present article describes a qualitative study designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-support intervention to promote breast-feeding in a deprived area. The aims of the study were to: explore stakeholders' experiences of the intervention; explore the development of a ,culture' of breast-feeding; and consider the potential of the initiative for building community capacity. The methods used in the research were in-depth interviews, diaries and direct observation. The findings describe the social and cultural barriers to breast-feeding experienced by women, and the ways in which professional and lay participants in the peer-support project attempt to reduce them. The advantages of partnership working between health professionals and lay volunteers are then explored. These include: sharing the workload; providing an informal tier of support to mothers; and importantly, offering support and advice stemming from personal experience. For lay supporters, the benefits of taking part in the project range from personal satisfaction at being recognised as skilled, to gains in confidence which potentially open up further educational and training opportunities. In conclusion, it is suggested that the ,success' of such interventions is unlikely to be captured solely by monitoring breast-feeding rates, but needs to take into account the wider context of community development. [source]


Consumer attitudes towards self-referral with early signs of cancer: implications for symptom awareness campaigns

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NONPROFIT & VOLUNTARY SECTOR MARKETING, Issue 4 2007
Douglas Eadie
Traditionally, secondary prevention programmes have employed mass screening approaches to assess for asymptomatic signs of cancer. It has been suggested that early detection strategies, involving public education and self-referral may prove more cost-effective, with low-risk populations for cancers with symptomatic presentation. The success of public education approaches is dependent on careful consideration of the psycho-social factors of self-examination and referral. This paper presents the findings from an exploratory study, using qualitative methods with an at-risk population of older people living in deprived communities in west-central Scotland. The study examines consumer perceptions of the early detection of cancer and the cultural barriers to self-referral, as well as response to aspects of communication strategy. The implications for design of symptom awareness campaigns, including use of message appeals, specification of target symptoms, identification of target audience and selection of communication channels, are discussed. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Cultural and practical barriers to seeking mental health treatment for Chinese Americans

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2004
Winnie W. KungArticle first published online: 11 DEC 200
Based on a sample of 1747 from the Chinese American Psychiatric Epidemiological Study, this report examined perceived barriers to mental health treatment. Two factors emerged, namely practical barriers, which included cost of treatment, time, knowledge of access, and language, and cultural barriers consisting of credibility of treatment, recognition of need, and fear of loss of face. Average ratings of all practical barrier items were higher than cultural barrier items, demonstrating the importance of pragmatic considerations for this population. In a novel attempt, this study examined the empirical link between these perceived barriers and actual mental health service use. The practical barrier factor showed significance in predicting service use for both the whole sample and a subsample of individuals with at least one lifetime mental disorder. Cultural barriers, however, did not attain significance. Practice and research implications of the findings are discussed. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comm Psychol 32: 27,43, 2004. [source]


Sexuality and personal relationships for people with an intellectual disability.

JOURNAL OF INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY RESEARCH, Issue 11 2009
Part I: service-user perspectives
Abstract Background Despite a recent ideological shift towards the recognition of sexual autonomy for people with an intellectual disability (ID), there are continuing social and cultural barriers to sexual expression. Part I of the current two-part study assessed the sexual knowledge, experiences and aspirations of service users through focus groups and also examined their perceptions of impediments to achieving sexual autonomy. Method Thirty-two participants (20 male, 12 female) attending an ID service participated in focus groups delineated by gender and age group (13,17 years; 18,30 years; 31+ years). Results Analysis of the focus groups showed that service users, especially those over the age of 18 years, had an understanding of their sexual rights but also identified a number of social and cultural barriers that they felt prevent them from achieving sexual autonomy. Those under the age of 18 years had only rudimentary knowledge of sexuality issues, for example pregnancy and sexual anatomy, but aspired to relationships and marriage similar to those over the age of 18 years. Family and staff attitudes appeared to be very influential in the views of respondents. All service users had received some form of sex education, although the benefits of such education appeared most enduring for those over 18 years. Conclusion Service users had an understanding of their sexual rights and the social and environmental barriers that prevent them from fulfilling their rights. The provision of sex education training and promotion of positive attitudes towards appropriate sexual expression is critical to the realization of sexual autonomy for people with an ID. [source]


Maternity waiting homes in Southern Lao PDR: The unique ,silk home'

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY RESEARCH (ELECTRONIC), Issue 5 2008
Elizabeth Eckermann
Abstract The concept of maternity waiting homes (MWH) has a long history spanning over 100 years. The research reported here was conducted in the Thateng District of Sekong Province in southern Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR) to establish whether the MWH concept would be affordable, accessible, and most importantly acceptable, as a strategy to improve maternal outcomes in the remote communities of Thateng with a high proportion of the population from ethnic minority groups. The research suggested that there were major barriers to minority ethnic groups using existing maternal health services (reflected in very low usage of trained birth attendants and hospitals and clinics) in Thateng. Unless MWH are adapted to overcome these potential barriers, such initiatives will suffer the same fate as existing maternal facilities. Consequently, the Lao iteration of the concept, as operationalized in the Silk Homes project in southern Lao PDR is unique in combining maternal and infant health services with opportunities for micro credit and income generating activities and allowing non-harmful traditional practices to co-exist alongside modern medical protocols. These innovative approaches to the MWH concept address the major economic, social and cultural barriers to usage of safe birthing options in remote communities of southern Lao PDR. [source]


Perceptions of Effective and Ineffective Nurse,Physician Communication in Hospitals

NURSING FORUM, Issue 3 2010
F. Patrick Robinson PhD
PROBLEM., Nurse,physician communication affects patient safety. Such communication has been well studied using a variety of survey and observational methods; however, missing from the literature is an investigation of what constitutes effective and ineffective interprofessional communication from the perspective of the professionals involved. The purpose of this study was to explore nurse and physician perceptions of effective and ineffective communication between the two professions. METHODS., Using focus group methodology, we asked nurses and physicians with at least 5 years' acute care hospital experience to reflect on effective and ineffective interprofessional communication and to provide examples. Three focus groups were held with 6 participants each (total sample 18). Sessions were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were coded into categories of effective and ineffective communication. FINDINGS., The following themes were found. For effective communication: clarity and precision of message that relies on verification, collaborative problem solving, calm and supportive demeanor under stress, maintenance of mutual respect, and authentic understanding of the unique role. For ineffective communication: making someone less than, dependence on electronic systems, and linguistic and cultural barriers. CONCLUSION., These themes may be useful in designing learning activities to promote effective interprofessional communication. [source]


Global organizations and e-learning: Leveraging adult learning in different cultures

PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT, Issue 6 2008
Edward P. Nathan
This article examines a number of issues regarding the leveraged use of global training within multinational organizations. Given a common purpose and using technology that may minimize cultural differences, is it possible for these organizations to overcome some of the cultural barriers to adult learning? In examining this concept, this article discusses issues of cultural differences, adult cognition, technology, developing global courseware, and measuring its impact. [source]


Immigration, employment relations, and health: Developing a research agenda

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 4 2010
Joan Benach
Abstract Background International migration has emerged as a global issue that has transformed the lives of hundreds of millions of persons. Migrant workers contribute to the economic growth of high-income countries often serving as the labour force performing dangerous, dirty and degrading work that nationals are reluctant to perform. Methods Critical examination of the scientific and "grey" literatures on immigration, employment relations and health. Results Both lay and scientific literatures indicate that public health researchers should be concerned about the health consequences of migration processes. Migrant workers are more represented in dangerous industries and in hazardous jobs, occupations and tasks. They are often hired as labourers in precarious jobs with poverty wages and experience more serious abuse and exploitation at the workplace. Also, analyses document migrant workers' problems of social exclusion, lack of health and safety training, fear of reprisals for demanding better working conditions, linguistic and cultural barriers that minimize the effectiveness of training, incomplete OHS surveillance of foreign workers and difficulty accessing care and compensation when injured. Therefore migrant status can be an important source of occupational health inequalities. Conclusions Available evidence shows that the employment conditions and associated work organization of most migrant workers are dangerous to their health. The overall impact of immigration on population health, however, still is poorly understood and many mechanisms, pathways and overall health impact are poorly documented. Current limitations highlight the need to engage in explicit analytical, intervention and policy research. Am. J. Ind. Med. 53:338,343, 2010. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Attitudes towards diabetes and its care: Evaluation before, immediately post-course and ,1 year after a practical, international inter-disciplinary course for diabetes teams.

PRACTICAL DIABETES INTERNATIONAL (INCORPORATING CARDIABETES), Issue 2 2001
Peter Rossing MD
Abstract The objective of the study was to evaluate differences in attitudes to diabetes and its management among diabetes health care professionals, and to evaluate whether these attitudes could be persistently modified by participation in courses in practical diabetology. The courses emphasize self-care, inter-disciplinary teamwork and applicability of acquired knowledge. Pre- and immediate post-course evaluation as well as a ,1 year post-course follow-up of attitudes to 12 general but central statements concerning diabetes and its management was performed for 144 participants (80 physicians, 52 nurses and 12 other team members) from 28 countries. Both pre- and post-course attitudes to the statements varied considerably even among experienced diabetes professionals. In general, a shift in attitudes in the intended direction was observed at the immediate post-course test. These changes were to a large extent maintained more than one year post-course although a large variability persisted. We conclude that international and inter-disciplinary education of health professionals is feasible and successful despite major linguistic and cultural barriers. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Pathways to care for patients with bipolar disorder

BIPOLAR DISORDERS, Issue 3 2005
Dinesh Bhugra
Bipolar disorder is a chronic, debilitating psychiatric illness with serious ramifications for patients, their families, and society. Despite the availability of effective treatments, this disease often goes untreated due to medical, financial, legal/governmental, and cultural barriers. In this review we explore possible reasons for this problem. Misdiagnosis of bipolar disorders is a common medical barrier. One pathway to care for individuals with bipolar disorder is through referral from primary care, but primary care physicians generally have not received special training in the recognition and management of bipolar disorder. This often leads to diagnostic delays or errors, which prevents timely ,filtering' of patients into specialized care. Using data bases we explored these pathways. Legislation in the USA, such as the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act (EMTALA), designed to ensure access to inpatient mental health care, has instead given hospitals financial incentives to limit inpatient mental health care capacities. Reimbursement of mental health care expenses is a significant issue impacting a patient's ability to gain access to care, as bipolar disorder is a costly disease to treat. Improving access to care among the bipolar community will require multilateral strategies to influence the actions and attitudes of patients, communities, providers, health care systems, and state/national governments. In other cultures, barriers to care differ according to a number of factors such as type of services, explanatory models of illness, misdiagnosis and perceptions of care givers. It is essential that clinicians are aware of pathways and barriers so that appropriate and accessible care can be provided. [source]