Curricular Characteristics (curricular + characteristic)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Institutional and curricular characteristics of leading graduate HRD programs in the United States

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2002
K. Peter Kuchinke
HRD graduate programs form an important component of the system of human resource education in the United States. This study investigated the institutional and curricular characteristics of fifty-five leading programs in this country, focusing on three areas: institutional arrangements, student enrollment, and core curriculum content. Findings include a large degree of heterogeneity among program names, departmental affiliations, and specializations. Compared to data from 1991, student enrollment has declined at the master's level while part-time course taking has increased. Analysis of the core curriculum at these institutions showed a disparity between course offerings and much current writing in the field. [source]


Invited reaction: Institutional and curricular characteristics of leading graduate HRD programs in the United States

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2002
Nancie Fimbel
First page of article [source]


Enhancing adult learning through interdisciplinary studies

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR ADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION, Issue 103 2004
Daphne W. Ntiri
This examination of the pedagogical and curricular characteristics and imperatives of an interdisciplinary studies program for adult learners, within a wider context of theory and practice, draws on the example of a general education course to demonstrate the vitality between interdisciplinary thinking and adult learning. [source]


A Curriculum-Based Classification System for Community Colleges

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES, Issue 122 2003
Gwyer Schuyler
The author proposes and tests a community college classification based on curricular characteristics and their association with institutional characteristics. The analysis seeks readily available data correlates to represent the percentage of a college's course offerings that are in the liberal arts. A simple two-category classification system using total enrollment is ultimately found to be the most accurate. [source]