Coping Resources (coping + resource)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Stress, Religious Coping Resources, and Depressive Symptoms in an Urban Adolescent Sample

JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION, Issue 1 2008
RUSSELL A. CARLETON
We surveyed low-income urban adolescents about their total exposure to urban stressors and their use of religious coping resources, specifically in the areas of social support, spiritual support, and community service opportunities provided by their congregations. Additionally, we assessed their current levels of depressive symptomatology. Among females, the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms was moderated by the use of spiritual support and community service opportunities. The moderating relationship was such that at low levels of stress, high usage of these resources protected against the development of depressive symptoms. At high levels of stress, however, the protective relationship was lost. Lastly, when the social support aspects of religious coping were statistically controlled, the moderation effect disappeared, suggesting that within this sample, the social support seeking aspects of the resources, rather than their religious nature, was responsible for the effects. [source]


Exposure to Violence, Coping Resources, and Psychological Adjustment of South African Children

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 1 2001
Oscar A. Barbarin Ph.D.
The effects of exposure to direct and vicarious political, family, and community violence on the adjustment of 625 six-year-old black South African children was examined. Ambient community violence was most consistently related to children's psychosocial outcomes. Resources in the form of individual child resilience, maternal coping, and positive family relationships were found to mitigate the adverse impact in all the assessed domains of children's functioning. [source]


The effect of stopping smoking on perceived stress levels

ADDICTION, Issue 8 2010
Peter Hajek
ABSTRACT Aims Many smokers believe that smoking helps them to cope with stress, and that stopping smoking would deprive them of an effective stress management tool. Changes in stress levels following long-term smoking cessation are not well mapped. This longitudinal project was designed to provide more robust data on post-cessation changes in perceived stress levels by following a cohort of smokers admitted to hospital after myocardial infarction (MI) or for coronary artery bypass (CAB) surgery, as such patients typically achieve higher continuous abstinence rates than other comparable samples. Design A total of 469 smokers hospitalized after MI or CAB surgery and wanting to stop smoking were seen in the hospital and completed 1-year follow-ups. Ratings of helpfulness of smoking in managing stress at baseline, smoking status (validated by salivary cotinine concentration) and ratings of perceived stress at baseline and at 1-year follow-up were collected. Findings Of the patients, 41% (n = 194) maintained abstinence for 1 year. Future abstainers and future smokers did not differ in baseline stress levels or in their perception of coping properties of smoking. However, abstainers recorded a significantly larger decrease in perceived stress than continuing smokers, and the result held when possible confounding factors were controlled for (P < 0.001). Conclusions In highly dependent smokers who report that smoking helps them cope with stress, smoking cessation is associated with lowering of stress. Whatever immediate effects smoking may have on perceived stress, overall it may generate or aggravate negative emotional states. The results provide reassurance to smokers worried that stopping smoking may deprive them of a valuable coping resource. [source]


A literature review of spirituality in coping with early-stage Alzheimer's disease

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 5a 2008
Linda Beuscher PhD
Aims., This paper presents a literature review focusing on the use of spirituality in coping by older persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease from their perspectives. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the existing body of knowledge about spirituality in coping with Alzheimer's disease and to apply a spiritual framework of coping in organizing the literature to identify themes and gaps in knowledge. Background., Despite the abundance of Alzheimer's disease research, little is known about how older persons with this devastating disease cope with the consequential losses. Maintaining a sense of normalcy and preserving self-worth are coping strategies reported by older persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. As spirituality is an effective coping resource for older persons with numerous psychological and personal losses in their lives, it may be an important coping resource for person with Alzheimer's disease. Method., A literature search was conducted to find research published between 1990,2006 aimed at understanding spirituality in coping with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions., Six research studies were reviewed. Findings suggest that persons with early-stage Alzheimer's disease draw from their spirituality and faith to find meaning and courage in facing the challenges of cognitive losses. Furthermore, they are able to provide rich information about their spirituality and the psychosocial aspects of living with Alzheimer's disease. Limited empirical knowledge compels the need for future research to explore how spirituality is utilized in coping with early-stage Alzheimer's disease. Relevance to clinical practice., Enhancing persons' abilities to cope effectively with their diseases is an important goal of nursing care. Understanding how older persons with Alzheimer's disease cope with their memory loss is critical to the development of evidence-based interventions to minimize the stress of living with this disease. [source]


Stress, Religious Coping Resources, and Depressive Symptoms in an Urban Adolescent Sample

JOURNAL FOR THE SCIENTIFIC STUDY OF RELIGION, Issue 1 2008
RUSSELL A. CARLETON
We surveyed low-income urban adolescents about their total exposure to urban stressors and their use of religious coping resources, specifically in the areas of social support, spiritual support, and community service opportunities provided by their congregations. Additionally, we assessed their current levels of depressive symptomatology. Among females, the relationship between stress and depressive symptoms was moderated by the use of spiritual support and community service opportunities. The moderating relationship was such that at low levels of stress, high usage of these resources protected against the development of depressive symptoms. At high levels of stress, however, the protective relationship was lost. Lastly, when the social support aspects of religious coping were statistically controlled, the moderation effect disappeared, suggesting that within this sample, the social support seeking aspects of the resources, rather than their religious nature, was responsible for the effects. [source]


Project 2000: a study of expected and experienced stressors and support reported by students and qualified nurses

JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 4 2000
Hilary Brown MSc BA RNT RN
Project 2000: a study of expected and experienced stressors and support reported by students and qualified nurses The present study was conducted in the light of major reforms to nurse education which have taken place in the United Kingdom since 1989. The study aimed to identify initially perceived stressors and coping resources and subsequently, to compare these with actually reported stressors and available resources, during a critical period in nurses' careers. Three groups of nurses participated who were undertaking, or had recently completed, the first Project 2000 course at a university in the south of England. Participants were given an open-ended questionnaire and asked to describe potential difficulties, and the coping resources they anticipated using, in a subsequent 6-month period. Following analysis of the descriptors a structured questionnaire was developed to measure actually experienced difficulties and coping resources that were reported; this was completed by the three groups 6 months after the initial phase of the study. Both student and staff nurse groups reported fewer stressors and more resources than they had predicted. Students anticipated difficulties with competence but actually reported financial difficulties. They experienced support from mentors although this was not anticipated. Newly qualified staff nurses experienced fewer difficulties with meeting personal expectations of the role than they had anticipated. They reported more use of emotion-focused coping and less professional support than the student groups. The results are discussed in relation to training needs. [source]


Pre-ICD Illness Beliefs Affect Postimplant Perceptions of Control and Patient Quality of Life

PACING AND CLINICAL ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY, Issue 3 2010
CLAIRE N. HALLAS Ph.D.
Background: The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a device used in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias and the prevention of sudden cardiac death. However, the ICD has been associated with negative psychological outcomes such as anxiety, depression, panic, and poor quality of life (QoL). Recent studies suggest that the preimplantation psychology of patients, combined with their postimplantation perceptions about their cardiac condition, are greater contributory factors than their medical status to a poor outcome. Method: Our study employed an interview-based qualitative grounded theory methodology to explore whether medical history hetereogeneity and illness beliefs impact on the QoL of 13 ICD patients. Results: Perceived control emerged as the core category related to QoL with three subsystem themes related to control: (1) illness beliefs, attributions, and appraisals; (2) coping resources and strategies; and (3) the social world. Patients at risk for the poorest adaptation were younger (<45), unemployed, and with an acute onset cardiac history. These patients interpreted their illness as severe, utilized emotion-focused coping (e.g., avoidance of situations), and believed themselves to be socially excluded. Adjusted patients used proactive problem-focused coping (e.g., normalizing) and minimized consequences of the device. Conclusions: The data developed a theoretical model of QoL, which identified perceived control, illness beliefs, and coping impacting on adjustment. From our study, we have a wider understanding of the combination psychological issues relevant to ICD patients and are able to treat those at risk with interventions to promote adjustment in the context of a society that values health and well-being. (PACE 2010; 33:256,265) [source]


Attachment style and coping resources as predictors of coping strategies in the transition to parenthood

PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS, Issue 2 2001
RICHARD ALEXANDER
The relations among adult attachment style, coping resources, appraised strain, and coping strategies were examined in a prospective study of married couples having their first child (N= 92). Attachment and coping resources were measured during the second trimester of pregnancy, and parenting strain and coping strategies were assessed when the babies were about 6 weeks old. Results supported a theoretical model proposing that attachment is predictive of coping resources and appraised strain, and that attachment, resources, and strain are predictive of coping strategies. Results also highlighted the complexity of associations among attachment, stress, and coping: Gender differences in mean scores and predictive associations were obtained, and some interactions were found between resources and strain in predicting coping strategies. The findings support the utility of integrating theories of attachment and coping in explaining couples'adjustment to important developmental transitions. [source]