Active Learning (active + learning)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Terms modified by Active Learning

  • active learning experience

  • Selected Abstracts


    Active Learning through Modeling: Introduction to Software Development in the Business Curriculum,

    DECISION SCIENCES JOURNAL OF INNOVATIVE EDUCATION, Issue 2 2004
    Boris Roussev
    ABSTRACT Modern software practices call for the active involvement of business people in the software process. Therefore, programming has become an indispensable part of the information systems component of the core curriculum at business schools. In this paper, we present a model-based approach to teaching introduction to programming to general business students. The theoretical underpinnings of the new approach are metaphor, abstraction, modeling, Bloom's classification of cognitive skills, and active learning. We employ models to introduce the basic programming constructs and their semantics. To this end, we use statecharts to model object's state and the environment model of evaluation as a virtual machine interpreting the programs written in JavaScript. The adoption of this approach helps learners build a sound mental model of the notion of computation process. Scholastic performance, student evaluations, our experiential observations, and a multiple regression statistical test prove that the proposed ideas improve the course significantly. [source]


    Toward a Global Theory of Mind: The Potential Benefits of Presenting a Range of IR Theories through Active Learning

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVES, Issue 4 2003
    A. L. Morgan
    Active learning is particularly well-suited to teaching across the range of perspectives inherent in the practice and study of international politics for two key reasons: (1) because of its capacity to highlight how subjective, intersubjective, and contested understandings play an important role in determining outcomes in the ivory tower as well as in the real world and (2) because of the compatibility between underlying theories of knowledge that inform active learning and the newer generation of IR theories including subaltern realism, social constructivism, constitutive theory, and postmodernism. This article explores the potential benefits of presenting these and other norm-oriented theories through active learning. It also discusses ways to overcome barriers to the integration of active learning techniques. [source]


    Active Learning Through Appellate Simulation: A Simple Recipe for a Business Law Course

    JOURNAL OF LEGAL STUDIES EDUCATION, Issue 2 2009
    William J. McDevitt
    [source]


    "This Is Active Learning": Theories of Language, Learning, and Social Relations in the Transmission of Khmer Literacy

    ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2003
    Assistant Professor Susan Needham
    This article examines the role language ideologies played in the changing instructional and social organization of Khmer literacy classes in Long Beach, California. Language and language use in classrooms have been carefully examined over the years, but analysis of how language attitudes influence pedagogical theory and practice has been largely neglected. This article reveals one way in which language ideologies engage with local theories of learning to shape not only pedagogies informing instruction but also social relations within classes. [source]


    Toward a Global Theory of Mind: The Potential Benefits of Presenting a Range of IR Theories through Active Learning

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVES, Issue 4 2003
    A. L. Morgan
    Active learning is particularly well-suited to teaching across the range of perspectives inherent in the practice and study of international politics for two key reasons: (1) because of its capacity to highlight how subjective, intersubjective, and contested understandings play an important role in determining outcomes in the ivory tower as well as in the real world and (2) because of the compatibility between underlying theories of knowledge that inform active learning and the newer generation of IR theories including subaltern realism, social constructivism, constitutive theory, and postmodernism. This article explores the potential benefits of presenting these and other norm-oriented theories through active learning. It also discusses ways to overcome barriers to the integration of active learning techniques. [source]


    Active learning for constructing transliteration lexicons from the Web

    JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, Issue 1 2008
    Jin-Shea Kuo
    This article presents an adaptive learning framework for Phonetic Similarity Modeling (PSM) that supports the automatic construction of transliteration lexicons. The learning algorithm starts with minimum prior knowledge about machine transliteration and acquires knowledge iteratively from the Web. We study the unsupervised learning and the active learning strategies that minimize human supervision in terms of data labeling. The learning process refines the PSM and constructs a transliteration lexicon at the same time. We evaluate the proposed PSM and its learning algorithm through a series of systematic experiments, which show that the proposed framework is reliably effective on two independent databases. [source]


    Active learning in nursing education (ALINE): New model for teaching and learning

    NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES, Issue 2 2004
    Vaunette Fay
    Traditional teaching and learning pedagogical models do not adequately address the needs of students and often present substantial barriers to incorporating the benefits of technology enhanced learning. Active learning in nursing education (ALINE) is a practical teaching and learning model that: (a) provides a well-defined framework for accurate assessment of learning outcomes/objectives by requiring each outcome and/or objective be linked to an identified primary nursing competency; (b) identifies and defines the core components of a course (elements, objects and modules) and provides a framework for development of each of the components; (c) requires active learning principles be applied to every action taken by the learner throughout the course. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the ALINE learning model and the first virtual conference on aging that was held between 21 April to 2 May 2003. [source]


    Gaps in Procedural Experience and Competency in Medical School Graduates

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2009
    Susan B. Promes MD
    Abstract Objectives:, The goal of undergraduate medical education is to prepare medical students for residency training. Active learning approaches remain important elements of the curriculum. Active learning of technical procedures in medical schools is particularly important, because residency training time is increasingly at a premium because of changes in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty hour rules. Better preparation in medical school could result in higher levels of confidence in conducting procedures earlier in graduate medical education training. The hypothesis of this study was that more procedural training opportunities in medical school are associated with higher first-year resident self-reported competency with common medical procedures at the beginning of residency training. Methods:, A survey was developed to assess self-reported experience and competency with common medical procedures. The survey was administered to incoming first-year residents at three U.S. training sites. Data regarding experience, competency, and methods of medical school procedure training were collected. Overall satisfaction and confidence with procedural education were also assessed. Results:, There were 256 respondents to the procedures survey. Forty-four percent self-reported that they were marginally or not adequately prepared to perform common procedures. Incoming first-year residents reported the most procedural experience with suturing, Foley catheter placement, venipuncture, and vaginal delivery. The least experience was reported with thoracentesis, central venous access, and splinting. Most first-year residents had not provided basic life support, and more than one-third had not performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Participation in a targeted procedures course during medical school and increasing the number of procedures performed as a medical student were significantly associated with self-assessed competency at the beginning of residency training. Conclusions:, Recent medical school graduates report lack of self-confidence in their ability to perform common procedures upon entering residency training. Implementation of a medical school procedure course to increase exposure to procedures may address this challenge. [source]


    Absent and Accounted For: Absenteeism and Cooperative Learning,

    DECISION SCIENCES JOURNAL OF INNOVATIVE EDUCATION, Issue 1 2006
    G. D. Koppenhaver
    ABSTRACT In a small section collaborative learning environment where student work teams promote mutual learning about investments, students limit the opportunity to learn from other students if they are absent from class. Absenteeism not only denies the student the opportunity to learn from others but also denies other members of the student's work team the opportunity to learn from the absent student. Other team members' absenteeism should be costly for individual performance if collaborative learning fosters learning and retention. The research finds that while absenteeism is detrimental to the student's own performance, absenteeism of other team members from team activities has a significant negative effect on both individual exam and homework scores. The conclusions validate the benefits of active learning and of encouraging attendance in collaborative learning environments in all disciplines. [source]


    Active Learning through Modeling: Introduction to Software Development in the Business Curriculum,

    DECISION SCIENCES JOURNAL OF INNOVATIVE EDUCATION, Issue 2 2004
    Boris Roussev
    ABSTRACT Modern software practices call for the active involvement of business people in the software process. Therefore, programming has become an indispensable part of the information systems component of the core curriculum at business schools. In this paper, we present a model-based approach to teaching introduction to programming to general business students. The theoretical underpinnings of the new approach are metaphor, abstraction, modeling, Bloom's classification of cognitive skills, and active learning. We employ models to introduce the basic programming constructs and their semantics. To this end, we use statecharts to model object's state and the environment model of evaluation as a virtual machine interpreting the programs written in JavaScript. The adoption of this approach helps learners build a sound mental model of the notion of computation process. Scholastic performance, student evaluations, our experiential observations, and a multiple regression statistical test prove that the proposed ideas improve the course significantly. [source]


    Knowledge Acquisition and Memory Effects Involving an Expert System Designed as a Learning Tool for Internal Control Assessment*

    DECISION SCIENCES JOURNAL OF INNOVATIVE EDUCATION, Issue 1 2003
    Mary Jane Lenard
    ABSTRACT The assessment of internal control is a consideration in all financial statement audits, as stressed by the Statement on Auditing Standards (SAS) No. 78. According to this statement, "the auditor should obtain an understanding of internal control sufficient to plan the audit" (Accounting Standards Board, 1995, p. 1). Therefore, an accounting student will progress through the auditing course with the responsibility of learning how and why internal controls are assessed. Research in expert systems applied to auditing has shown that there is strong support for the constructive dialogue used in expert systems as a means of encouraging their use in decision making (Eining, Jones, & Loebbecke, 1997). The purpose of this study is to provide the student or novice auditor with a method for developing a more comprehensive understanding of internal controls and the use of internal controls in audit planning. The results of the study reinforce previous findings that novices do better when an expert system applies analogies along with declarative explanations, and clarifies the length of time in which the use of active learning in a training system can provide an improvement to declarative knowledge, but procedural knowledge must be acquired over a longer time frame. [source]


    Developing and evaluating an interactive information skills tutorial,

    HEALTH INFORMATION & LIBRARIES JOURNAL, Issue 2 2006
    Maria J. Grant
    Objective:, To develop and evaluate a web-based interactive information skills tutorial integrated into the curriculum. To determine whether the tutorial was acceptable to students and explore the use of a skills assessment tool in identifying whether the tutorial improved skills. Methods:, The development of a tutorial on OVID medline to teach transferable information skills. A small cohort study to evaluate students' views on the tutorial and its effects on information skills. Results:, Thirteen objective assessments were usable. There was a statistically significant improvement in mean final assessment scores, compared with mean pre-training scores, F(2,14) = 11.493, P = 0.001. Eleven (85%) students had improved their overall information skills. The improvement in overall searching skills was enhanced by referral to the tutorial. Conclusions:, The tutorial was successfully developed and integrated into a Masters programme curriculum. In this setting, it appears to reinforce active learning, and was well received by students, who developed core generic searching skills and demonstrated improved information skills in the short and longer term. Students could use the tutorial for revision and study at a time and place of their choosing. Further evaluation is required to assess the impact of using the tutorial with large groups of students, and as a stand-alone teaching medium. [source]


    Active versus passive teaching styles: An empirical study of student learning outcomes

    HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2009
    Norbert Michel
    This study compares the impact of an active teaching approach and a traditional (or passive) teaching style on student cognitive outcomes. Across two sections of an introductory business course, one class was taught in an active or "nontraditional" manner, with a variety of active learning exercises. The second class was taught in a passive or "traditional" manner, emphasizing daily lectures. Although the active learning approach does not appear to have improved overall mastery of the subject, we did find evidence that active learning can lead to improved cognitive outcomes in class-specific materials. The discussion emphasizes the role of delivery style on learning outcomes. [source]


    Toward a Global Theory of Mind: The Potential Benefits of Presenting a Range of IR Theories through Active Learning

    INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PERSPECTIVES, Issue 4 2003
    A. L. Morgan
    Active learning is particularly well-suited to teaching across the range of perspectives inherent in the practice and study of international politics for two key reasons: (1) because of its capacity to highlight how subjective, intersubjective, and contested understandings play an important role in determining outcomes in the ivory tower as well as in the real world and (2) because of the compatibility between underlying theories of knowledge that inform active learning and the newer generation of IR theories including subaltern realism, social constructivism, constitutive theory, and postmodernism. This article explores the potential benefits of presenting these and other norm-oriented theories through active learning. It also discusses ways to overcome barriers to the integration of active learning techniques. [source]


    Learning About Foodborne Pathogens: Evaluation of Student Perceptions of Group Project Work in a Food Microbiology Course

    JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE EDUCATION, Issue 4 2009
    Mark S. Turner
    ABSTRACT:, This study examined the experiences of students in an active learning group work exercise in an introductory food microbiology course involving the study of foodborne pathogens. Small groups were required to access, analyze, and present information regarding a single food poisoning bacterium. The presentations contained features and epidemiological information of the pathogen and also a review of a research journal article and a real food poisoning outbreak report involving the pathogen. Analysis of responses from a questionnaire that allowed direct comparisons to be made with other published group work studies revealed that this exercise was a positive learning experience. In particular, students noted improvements in communication, interaction, information acquisition, and organizational skills. [source]


    One Approach to Formulating and Evaluating Student Work Groups in Legal Environment of Business Courses

    JOURNAL OF LEGAL STUDIES EDUCATION, Issue 1 2007
    Joan E. Camara
    The principal focus of this study is an investigation of whether students' grade point average (GPA) is a viable criterion for forming student work groups in the undergraduate Legal Environment of Business course. More specifically, the research focuses on the impact of: (1) GPA-homogeneous (HO) and GPA-heterogeneous (HE) groups upon student satisfaction with group processes and (2) the impact on individual student performance in both group and nongroup assignments. Data obtained from fourteen HE and fourteen HO student groups, in four separate Legal Environment of Business classes consisting of a mix of Management, Marketing, Computer Information Systems, International Business, Financial Services, and Accounting majors, generated a number of significant results. The most surprising observations dealt with the behavior of low achievers whose individual grades showed substantial improvement after working in HO groups. Researchers who are assessing pedagogical methods which serve to engage a student's active learning and motivation should find these results to be of interest. In addition, the beneficial impact on task and relationship behaviors observed in this study should provide solace or a sense of reward to the larger set of academicians, across disciplines, who attempt to impart realistic organizational skills to their classes. [source]


    Effects of active-learning experiences on achievement, attitudes, and behaviors in high school biology

    JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 7 2007
    Roman Taraban
    Abstract Active-learning labs for two topics in high school biology were developed through the collaboration of high school teachers and university faculty and staff and were administered to 408 high school students in six classrooms. The content of instruction and testing was guided by State of Texas science objectives. Detailed teacher records describing daily classroom activities were used to operationalize two types of instruction: active learning, which used the labs; and traditional, which used the teaching resources ordinarily available to the teacher. Teacher records indicated that they used less independent work and fewer worksheets, and more collaborative and lab-based activities, with active-learning labs compared to traditional instruction. In-class test data show that students gained significantly more content knowledge and knowledge of process skills using the labs compared to traditional instruction. Questionnaire data revealed that students perceived greater learning gains after completing the labs compared to covering the same content through traditional methods. An independent questionnaire administered to a larger sample of teachers who used the lab-based curriculum indicated that they perceived changing their behaviors as intended by the student-centered principles of the labs. The major implication of this study is that active-learning,based laboratory units designed and developed collaboratively by high school teachers and university faculty, and then used by high school teachers in their classrooms, can lead to increased use of student-centered instructional practices as well as enhanced content knowledge and process learning for students. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 44: 960,979, 2007 [source]


    Student views on the effective teaching of physical examination skills: a qualitative study

    MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 2 2009
    Merel J C Martens
    Objectives, The lack of published studies into effective skills teaching in clinical skills centres inspired this study of student views of the teaching behaviours of skills teachers. Methods, We organised focus group discussions with students from Years 1,3 of a 6-year undergraduate medical curriculum. A total of 30 randomly selected students, divided into three groups, took part in two sessions. They discussed what teaching skills helped them to acquire physical examination skills. Results, Students' opinions related to didactic skills, interpersonal and communication skills and preconditions. Students appreciated didactic skills that stimulate deep and active learning. Another significant set of findings referred to teachers' attitudes towards students. Students wanted teachers to be considerate and to take them seriously. This was reflected in student descriptions of positive behaviours, such as: ,responding to students' questions'; ,not exposing students' weaknesses in front of the group', and ,[not] putting students in an embarrassing position in skill demonstrations'. They also appreciated enthusiasm in teachers. Important preconditions included: the integration of skills training with basic science teaching; linking of skills training to clinical practice; the presence of clear goals and well-structured sessions; good time management; consistency of teaching, and the appropriate personal appearance of teachers and students. Conclusions, The teaching skills and behaviours that most facilitate student acquisition of physical examination skills are interpersonal and communication skills, followed by a number of didactic interventions, embedded in several preconditions. Findings related to interpersonal and communication skills are comparable with findings pertaining to the teaching roles of tutors and clinical teachers; however, the didactic skills merit separate attention as teaching skills for use in skills laboratories. The results of this study should be complemented by a study performed in a larger population and a study exploring teachers' views. [source]


    Teaching paediatric residents about learning disorders: use of standardised case discussion versus multimedia computer tutorial

    MEDICAL EDUCATION, Issue 8 2005
    Carolyn Frazer Bridgemohan
    Background, We developed a standardised case-based educational exercise on the topic of childhood learning disorders, and a multimedia computerised adaptation of this exercise, as part of a national curriculum project based on the Bright Futures guidelines. Objective, To explore resident perceptions of the facilitated case discussion (FCD) and the computerised tutorial (CT). Design, Quasi-randomised comparison of two educational interventions. Setting, Preclinic teaching conferences at a large urban children's hospital. Participants, A total of 46 paediatric residents years 1,3 assigned to either FCD (n = 21) or CT (n = 25). Interventions, FCD residents met in groups of 8,12 with a trained facilitator for a structured case discussion, while CT residents worked in groups of 2,3 at a computer station linked to an interactive website. Outcome Measures, Participant responses during semistructured focus group interviews. Analysis, Focus group transcripts, field notes and computer logs were analysed simultaneously using qualitative grounded theory methodology. Results, Residents experienced CT as fun, offering flexibility, greater auditory and visual appeal and more opportunities for active learning. FCD allowed greater contact with expert faculty and made the material more relevant to clinical practice. FCD participants emphasised the clinical skills gleaned and stated that the learning experience would change their future patient management. Both groups reported that case discussion was more interactive than computer learning. Median time spent on learning was slightly shorter for the CT group. All groups of learners arrived at the correct final diagnosis. Conclusions, FCD and CT stimulate different types of learning among paediatric residents. Future studies are needed to determine how to integrate these two techniques to meet the learning needs of residents in diverse settings. [source]


    Geriatric Emergency Medicine with Integrated Simulation Curriculum

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2009
    Chris Doty
    Our initiative is a replicable model curriculum that teaches emergency geriatric care principles utilizing didactics and immersive simulation. Simulated scenarios encompass principles specific to geriatric care. Major curricular principles include: 1) respect for patients' autonomy, 2) accommodating patients' physical and cognitive limitations, 3) appropriate resource utilization, and 4) accurate symptom recognition and clinical decision-making. These four basic principles are incorporated throughout the curriculum and specifically during three simulated scenarios: 1) a patient with respiratory distress in the setting of end-stage cancer and end-of-life teaches topics pertaining to living wills, health care proxies and DNR orders; 2) a fallen patient requiring a trauma evaluation and safe discharge teaches resource utilization, complex evaluation of home environment, social support principles, access to medical care concepts, and utilization of institutional social services; 3) a patient with altered mental status caused by polypharmacy and sepsis teaches geriatric diagnostic and intervention challenges. Faculty teach specific clinical tactics such as minimizing distractions, frequent reorientation, minimal use of urinary catheters and "tethering" devices, prompt triage and medical screening exams, and coordinating disposition with family, nursing, and clerical staff. The curriculum also includes large classroom didactics incorporating active learning via live streamed simulation into the resident conference room. We developed an internet-based tool to manage the curriculum and track resident participation. The tool stores and sends educational handouts via email and displays digital media (e.g., radiographs, EKGs) on screen during lectures and simulation sessions. Learning objectives are measured and reinforced with pre- and post-curriculum test questions. [source]


    Incorporating a collaborative web-based virtual laboratory in an undergraduate bioinformatics course

    BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY EDUCATION, Issue 1 2010
    David Weisman
    Abstract Face-to-face bioinformatics courses commonly include a weekly, in-person computer lab to facilitate active learning, reinforce conceptual material, and teach practical skills. Similarly, fully-online bioinformatics courses employ hands-on exercises to achieve these outcomes, although students typically perform this work offsite. Combining a face-to-face lecture course with a web-based virtual laboratory presents new opportunities for collaborative learning of the conceptual material, and for fostering peer support of technical bioinformatics questions. To explore this combination, an in-person lecture-only undergraduate bioinformatics course was augmented with a remote web-based laboratory, and tested with a large class. This study hypothesized that the collaborative virtual lab would foster active learning and peer support, and tested this hypothesis by conducting a student survey near the end of the semester. Respondents broadly reported strong benefits from the online laboratory, and strong benefits from peer-provided technical support. In comparison with traditional in-person teaching labs, students preferred the virtual lab by a factor of two. Key aspects of the course architecture and design are described to encourage further experimentation in teaching collaborative online bioinformatics laboratories. [source]


    National undergraduate electronic design contest: A vehicle for enhancing active learning

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY, Issue 4 2010
    Yuqing Chen
    First page of article [source]