Conflict Resolution (conflict + resolution)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Terms modified by Conflict Resolution

  • conflict resolution practice
  • conflict resolution strategy

  • Selected Abstracts


    Peer mediation training and program implementation in elementary schools: Research results

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2002
    Kathy Bickmore
    This research examines the implementation and effects of a peer mediation program in twenty-eight urban elementary schools. The Center for Conflict Resolution, a program of the Cleveland, Ohio, public schools, provided intensive training and follow-up support for teams of peer mediators and adult advisers at each school. Trainers were youths from the same community. Qualitative and quantitative evidence indicate that this program significantly improved the average eight- to eleven-year-old students understanding of and inclination to use nonviolent conflict resolution and his or her capacity to achieve in school. The study outlines the specific commitments from administrators and other staff members that were required to develop and implement equitable, effective, and sustainable programs. [source]


    Student Conflict Resolution, Power "Sharing" in Schools, and Citizenship Education

    CURRICULUM INQUIRY, Issue 2 2001
    Kathy Bickmore
    One goal of elementary education is to help children develop the skills, knowledge, and values associated with citizenship. However, there is little consensus about what these goals really mean: various schools, and various programs within any school, may promote different notions of "good citizenship." Peer conflict mediation, like service learning, creates active roles for young people to help them develop capacities for democratic citizenship (such as critical reasoning and shared decision making). This study examines the notions of citizenship embodied in the contrasting ways one peer mediation model was implemented in six different elementary schools in the same urban school district. This program was designed to foster leadership among diverse young people, to develop students' capacities to be responsible citizens by giving them tangible responsibility, specifically the power to initiate and carry out peer conflict management activities. In practice, as the programs developed, some schools did not share power with any of their student mediators, and other schools shared power only with the kinds of children already seen as "good" students. All of the programs emphasized the development of nonviolent community norms,a necessary but not sufficient condition for democracy. A few programs began to engage students in critical reasoning and/or in taking the initiative in influencing the management of problems at their schools, thus broadening the space for democratic learning. These case studies help to clarify what our visions of citizenship (education) may look and sound like in actual practice so that we can deliberate about the choices thus highlighted. [source]


    The EU and Conflict Resolution: Promoting Peace in the Backyard , By N. Tocci

    JCMS: JOURNAL OF COMMON MARKET STUDIES, Issue 3 2008
    DOV LYNCH
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Stereotypes and Moral Oversight in Conflict Resolution: What Are We Teaching?

    JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, Issue 4 2002
    J. Harvey
    I examine some common trends in ,conflict management skills', particularly those focused on practical results, and argue that they involve some moral problems, like the reliance on offensive stereotypes, the censorship of moral language, the promotion of distorted relationships, and sometimes the suppression of basic rights and obligations that constitute non,consequentialist moral constraints on human interactions (including dispute resolution). Since these approaches now appear in educational institutions, they are sending dangerous messages to those least able to critically assess them, messages that denigrate the language, reflection, and interactions on which the moral life depends, thus undermining the possibility of moral education in the most fundamental sense of the phrase. [source]


    A Contingency Perspective of Communication, Conflict Resolution and Buyer Search Effort in Buyer-Supplier Relationships

    JOURNAL OF SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, Issue 1 2004
    Cindy Claycomb
    SUMMARY This study investigates the moderating effects of buying context on the relationship between communication elements and the effort buyers exert while searching for new suppliers throughout a buyer-supplier relationship development process. A mail survey of members of the Institute for Supply ManagementÔ was conducted and the data were analyzed using moderated regression. The results suggest that company size, buyer experience, relationship duration and relationship importance affect the association between a buyer's search effort and the communication elements. Interestingly, the buying context affects the relationship between search effort and the communication elements in different ways and to a different extent in each stage of the relationship development process. [source]


    Keeping the Peace: Conflict Resolution and Peaceful Societies around the World

    AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST, Issue 2 2006
    LESLIE E. SPONSEL
    Keeping the Peace: Conflict Resolution and Peaceful Societies around the World. Graham Kemp and Douglas P. Fry, eds. New York: Routledge, 2004. 231 pp. [source]


    The Internal Israeli Conflict: The Past, Present, and Future of the Jewish West Bank and Gaza Settlements

    NEGOTIATION JOURNAL, Issue 2 2005
    Robert Mnookin
    On October 14 and 15, 2004, just days before the Israeli government submitted to the Knesset a draft legislation to authorize the evacuation of Jewish settlers from Gaza Strip and some settlements on the West Bank, a two-day conference titled "Past, Present, and Future of the Jewish West Bank and Gaza Settlements: The Internal Israeli Conflict" was held at Harvard Law School. The conference was sponsored by the Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School, the Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and the United States Institute of Peace. This interdisciplinary conference's six panels, whose proceedings are summarized in the series of articles that follow, explored the religious, ideological, psychological, political, legal, and international dimensions of the conflict. Presenters included former and current Israeli and American government officials, experts on resettlement policies and compensation mechanisms, and scholars from a variety of disciplines. While presentation topics covered a range of issues relating to the settlements, three broad themes arose from the conference. First, participants agreed that it is important, if not fundamental, to understand the perspectives of the national religious settlers who are the driving force behind the settlement movement. Exploring the settlers' diverse interests, fears, and identities is necessary in order to see why relocation is so threatening to them. The Israeli government can lessen opposition to withdrawal by showing the settlers empathy and reassurance, but only if government officials first achieve a true understanding of the settlers' concerns. Participants also argued that a reframing of the relocation in ideological terms could be another critical component of a solution to this problem. It may be necessary for the leaders of the settlement movement to develop a new narrative or modify the existing one in order to legitimize their relocation. Part of this narrative will involve the concept of "a greater good", the government must reassure the settlers that their sacrifice is for a higher cause. Several participants noted that Israel needs to show the settlers "tough love." When the relocations begin, many expect that there will be violence and that disturbing images will be broadcast throughout Israel and around the world. Internal disruption could put the government led by Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and his Likud party coalition in jeopardy. The government must not waver in the face of this crisis, conference participants argued. In fact, the threat of violent and disruptive resistance by settlers and their allies can be part of the solution, not just the problem. The government and relocation supporters can use this extremism to justify decisive measures and to redefine the problem for the broader population to convince them that the stability of the country is at stake. Another major conclusion of conference participants was that, while the Israeli settlement issue has unique features, there is much to be learned from comparative analysis. Other countries have dealt with settlement situations, and their experiences offer invaluable lessons. In particular, participants contrasted Israel's settlements in Gaza and the West Bank with French settlements in Algeria and English settlements in Ireland. Some pointed to the French withdrawal from Algeria, which was politically painful but ultimately successful, as an example of "tough love" that Israel should follow. Finally, the involvement of third parties to help solve this conflict is indispensable. Participants noted that while much of Israel feels alienated from the European Union and the United Nations, the Israeli government is highly sensitive to the concerns of the United States, as evidenced by Sharon's decision to show the Gaza withdrawal plan to the U.S. government before he had even raised it with his cabinet and the Israeli parliament, the Knesset. International participation could help legitimize withdrawal and reduce Israeli responsibility for Gaza's future. Third parties can apply political pressure to encourage an accountable and responsible Palestinian leadership. They may also be called upon to provide some sort of financial aid. The participants acknowledged the complexity of the settlement problem and recognized that easy solutions do not exist. Yet, if the Israeli government works toward understanding the settlers' perspectives, learns from comparative analysis, and involves third parties appropriately, the likelihood of a successful outcome increases greatly. [source]


    An Experiment in "Practice to Theory" in Conflict Resolution

    NEGOTIATION JOURNAL, Issue 4 2002
    Sandra Cheldelin
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Understanding the Art and Techniques of Conflict Resolution

    NEGOTIATION JOURNAL, Issue 4 2002
    Theodore W. Kheel
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Social Psychology's Contributions to the Study of Conflict Resolution

    NEGOTIATION JOURNAL, Issue 4 2002
    Morton Deutsch
    This essay presents an indication of the major research questions addressed in the literature of social psychology related to conflict resolution, as well as a historical perspective to see what progress has been made in this area. Highlighted at the conclusion of a section on contemporary themes in conflict studies is the author's consideration of what we know (and need to know) about conflict resolution and overcoming oppression. The author also offers an assessment of the progress thus far in the methodological, conceptual, empirical, and technological domains in the social psychological study of conflict. [source]


    Frayed Edges: Exploring the Boundaries of Conflict Resolution

    PEACE & CHANGE, Issue 4 2002
    Larissa A. Fast
    This article examines the boundary areas of the field of conflict resolution. It proposes that to advance as a practice and academic discipline, conflict resolution must define more clearly its theoretical and practice boundaries. Based on the assumption that this field requires its theory, practice, and research to complement one another, the article first outlines two boundary areas, that of theory about structural conflict and that of impartiality and neutrality in conflict resolution practice. The author proposes that developing theories about structural conflict will promote better interventions, an area where conflict resolution practice currently is underdeveloped. The debates about impartiality and neutrality in conflict resolution practice lead the author to propose two delimiters for practice,impartiality and inclusiveness,that will differentiate conflict resolution from other related fields. The article concludes with a recommendation about how integrating theory, practice, and research can advance the field as a whole. [source]


    II,Reflections on the Reasonable and the Rational in Conflict Resolution

    ARISTOTELIAN SOCIETY SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUME, Issue 1 2009
    Ruth Chang
    Most familiar approaches to social conflict moot reasonable ways of dealing with conflict, ways that aim to serve values such as legitimacy, justice, morality, fairness, fidelity to individual preferences, and so on. In this paper, I explore an alternative approach to social conflict that contrasts with the leading approaches of Rawlsians, perfectionists, and social choice theorists. The proposed approach takes intrinsic features of the conflict,what I call a conflict's evaluative ,structure',as grounds for a rational way of responding to that conflict. Like conflict within a single person, social conflict can have a distinctive evaluative structure that supports certain rational responses over others. I suggest that one common structure in both intra- and interpersonal cases of conflict supports the rational response of ,self-governance'. Self-governance in the case of social conflict involves a society's deliberating over the question, ,What kind of society should we be?' In liberal democracies, this rational response is also a reasonable one. [source]


    Modifications in Children's Goals When Encountering Obstacles to Conflict Resolution

    CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 3 2005
    Wendy Troop-Gordon
    Previous studies have demonstrated that children's goals are associated with their success in peer relationships. The current study extends earlier findings by examining changes in children's goals during hypothetical conflicts. Participants were 252 children ages 9 to 12 years old (133 boys, 119 girls). As predicted, children's goals changed significantly when they encountered obstacles to conflict resolution, and these changes were predictive of their subsequent strategy choices. Both aggressive- and submissive-rejected children were more likely to evidence antisocial changes in their goals, including an increased desire to retaliate. They also showed reluctance to forego instrumental objectives. Other findings highlighted the need to investigate the combinations of goals children pursue as predictors of their strategies and the quality of their peer relationships. [source]


    Conflict resolution among early childhood educators

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2008
    Sandy Jenkins
    Little attention has been given to conflict resolution in preschools. Early childhood educators working with children aged three to five completed a ten-to fifteen-minute survey to examine their attitudes and practices toward conflict. This study explored the types of conflict resolution strategies they used and thought were effective in their classrooms. The strategies were also examined in relation to the demographic characteristics of the participants. Results indicated that educators used cooperative strategies in their classrooms. Significant relationships were demonstrated involving the types of strategies used and demographic factors. [source]


    Conflict resolution and bully prevention: Skills for school success

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2006
    Roberta A. Heydenberk
    In a two-year study, 673 elementary students participated in a bully prevention program that included seven training sessions introducing affective vocabulary, social and emotional literacy, and Conflict resolution skills. Treatment groups showed statistically significant gains on the Conflict resolution subscale of the standardized instrument employed. No gains were found in the comparison groups. A decrease in bullying and an increased sense of safety were indicated from student and staff questionnaire responses. [source]


    Conflict resolution in a non-Western context: Conversations with Indonesian scholars and practitioners

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2006
    Brett R. Noel
    This paper describes two sets of U.S. Department of State funded workshops conducted in 2003. The purpose of one set of workshops was to introduce Indonesian educators and community leaders to Western-influenced conflict resolution education (CRE) while the other workshops sought to encourage participants to engage in conflict-focused research adapted to the culture and needs of Indonesia. [source]


    Conflict resolution and moral reasoning

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2003
    Warren R. Heydenberk
    The effects of conflict resolution training on students' moral reasoning were examined in this five-year study. Inspired by pilot studies that found increased attachment, cooperation, and prosocial skills in treatment classrooms, the study was conducted with elementary students (ten treatment groups and eight comparison groups) in a low-income Philadelphia school and in two schools in a suburban low-income district. Treatment group teachers were trained in integrated conflict resolution strategies, and they were provided ongoing support to ensure classroom implementation of conflict resolution skills. Treatment group students demonstrated significant improvement in moral reasoning. [source]


    Conflict resolution in women is related to trait aggression and menstrual cycle phase

    AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 3 2003
    Alyson J. Bond
    Abstract Twenty-four women with a diagnosis of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and 18 controls took part in a study of patterns of female aggression. They completed a version of the Conflict Tactics Scale for a premenstrual and a follicular phase of their menstrual cycle and for the past year. The Life History of Aggression was completed during a clinician interview. The women used more aggressive tactics to solve conflicts in the premenstrual than in the follicular phase, but the difference was only significant for the PMDD group. During the past year, reasoning was the most common strategy used by women to resolve conflicts, but verbal aggression was also prevalent. Although physical violence was less common, the prevalence of any act of violence was 33% in the controls and 62% in the clinical group. Women with PMDD used both verbal and physical aggression more frequently than the controls and had a higher lifetime history of aggression. Aggression by women toward partners was associated with a general tendency to act aggressively. Aggr. Behav. 29:228,238, 2003. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Conflict resolution at a classical tempo: In conducting their proceedings, the neutral and the maestro share common ground

    ALTERNATIVES TO THE HIGH COST OF LITIGATION, Issue 1 2008
    Robert M. Shafton
    Inspired by a classical festival, Robert Shafton, of Los Angeles, takes a lighter look at conflict resolution techniques and practices, analogizing conductors and orchestra members to neutrals and advocates. [source]


    History, memory, and conflict resolution: Research and application

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2010
    Barbara Tint
    This article is the second of a two-part series and presents empirical research into the study of history, memory, and long-term intractable conflict. Interviews with members of the Israeli and Palestinian communities serve as the basis for this research. A variety of constructs emerged that inform conflict resolution practice, including a strong orientation to the past and its link to identity, emotion, and how past beliefs inform present perceptions. Recommendations are offered for how to integrate historical matter more fully into practice. [source]


    Environmental conflict resolution: Evaluating performance outcomes and contributing factors

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2009
    Kirk Emerson
    This empirical study of fifty-two environmental conflict resolution (ECR) processes is based on an evaluation framework that specifies key conditions and factors that contribute to ECR outcomes. Data were collected on a range of ECR processes and applications. This article reports on findings from a multilevel modeling analysis that focuses on three primary outcomes: reaching agreement, the quality of agreement, and improved working relationships among parties. Effective engagement of parties is identified as a major contributor to all three outcomes. Other key factors that operate directly and indirectly through effective engagement are involvement of appropriate parties, the skills and practices of ECR mediators and facilitators, and incorporation of relevant and high-quality information. Findings generally support the ECR evaluation framework. [source]


    Unofficial international conflict resolution: Is there a Track 1½?

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2009
    Are there best practices?
    Analysis of twenty-four cases of unofficial international conflict resolution initiatives, done according to similarities across seven variables, shows that the practice of "Track 1½" diplomacy is distinct from Track 2 diplomacy. Furthermore, these initiatives are distinguished by their focus on process or diverse goals. Multidimensional scaling organized the cases into four groupings of similar initiatives: Track 1½ process-focused, Track 1½ diversified, Track 2 process-focused, and Track 2 diversified. The variety of approaches used in these twenty-four cases of high-quality international conflict resolution initiatives suggests best practices. These practices should be considered sensitive to context rather than a standard set of procedures used regardless of conflict environment. [source]


    Building trust with parties: Are mediators overdoing it?

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2009
    Arnaud Stimec
    Trust is a key factor in the dynamics of any attempt to settle a conflict. A mediator may be the needed link between the parties, as long as they trust their mediator. But how far should mediators go to win parties' trust? On the basis of questionnaires filled out by participants in employer-employee mediation, we arrive at a conclusion that differs from the prevailing wisdom. There is a threshold point rather than a linear relationship between the level of trust in the mediator and the degree of conflict resolution. Once the threshold has been reached, additional trust does not necessarily result in a higher level of conflict resolution. Possible explanations are set out and practical implications are discussed. [source]


    Conflict resolution among early childhood educators

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 4 2008
    Sandy Jenkins
    Little attention has been given to conflict resolution in preschools. Early childhood educators working with children aged three to five completed a ten-to fifteen-minute survey to examine their attitudes and practices toward conflict. This study explored the types of conflict resolution strategies they used and thought were effective in their classrooms. The strategies were also examined in relation to the demographic characteristics of the participants. Results indicated that educators used cooperative strategies in their classrooms. Significant relationships were demonstrated involving the types of strategies used and demographic factors. [source]


    What sticks: How medical residents and academic health care faculty transfer conflict resolution training from the workshop to the workplace

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2008
    Ellen B. Zweibel
    Workshops in conflict resolution were given to enhance the ability of residents and academic health care faculty to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams, patient care, hospital committees, public health issues, teaching, and research. A qualitative research study on the transfer of learning from the workshops to the workplace reports on the attitude, knowledge, and skills consistently reported both immediately after the workshops and twelve months later. Learners' descriptions of workplace conflict confirmed they gained a positive outlook on conflict and their own ability to solve problems and apply conflict resolution skills, such as interest analysis and communication techniques, to gain perspective, reduce tension, increase mutual understanding, and build relationships in patient care, teaching, research, and administration. [source]


    Using theory of change to enhance peace education evaluation

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2007
    Carolyne V. Ashton
    This article brings together concepts and practices from the fields of peace education, conflict resolution, and evaluation. It examines the implementation and evaluations of selected peace education programs conducted by UNICEF to determine if theories of change can be identified and to consider how theories of change may inform the design and evaluation of future peace education programs. [source]


    Interactive reflection as a creative teaching strategy

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 3 2005
    Allison Patten McGuire
    The purpose of this article is to present interactive reflection as a creative teaching strategy and demonstrate its role in teaching conflict resolution. The article discusses examples of interactive reflection in action and identifies potential barriers or roadblocks to using such a strategy. [source]


    Conflict resolution and moral reasoning

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2003
    Warren R. Heydenberk
    The effects of conflict resolution training on students' moral reasoning were examined in this five-year study. Inspired by pilot studies that found increased attachment, cooperation, and prosocial skills in treatment classrooms, the study was conducted with elementary students (ten treatment groups and eight comparison groups) in a low-income Philadelphia school and in two schools in a suburban low-income district. Treatment group teachers were trained in integrated conflict resolution strategies, and they were provided ongoing support to ensure classroom implementation of conflict resolution skills. Treatment group students demonstrated significant improvement in moral reasoning. [source]


    Peer mediation training and program implementation in elementary schools: Research results

    CONFLICT RESOLUTION QUARTERLY, Issue 2 2002
    Kathy Bickmore
    This research examines the implementation and effects of a peer mediation program in twenty-eight urban elementary schools. The Center for Conflict Resolution, a program of the Cleveland, Ohio, public schools, provided intensive training and follow-up support for teams of peer mediators and adult advisers at each school. Trainers were youths from the same community. Qualitative and quantitative evidence indicate that this program significantly improved the average eight- to eleven-year-old students understanding of and inclination to use nonviolent conflict resolution and his or her capacity to achieve in school. The study outlines the specific commitments from administrators and other staff members that were required to develop and implement equitable, effective, and sustainable programs. [source]


    Corporate,community relations in Nigeria's oil industry: challenges and imperatives

    CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2006
    Uwafiokun Idemudia
    Abstract The adoption of corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and corporate,community relation (CCR) strategies by oil companies has failed to reduce the incidence of violent conflict between the host communities and oil companies in the Niger Delta, Nigeria. This paper argues that the failure to seek, understand and integrate community perceptions into CSR policies and practices, the over-emphasis of affirmative duties to the detriment of negative injunction duties and the absence of an enabling environment due to government failure are responsible for the observed problem. The paper concludes that unless these gaps are addressed, CSR by the Nigerian oil industry is likely to continue to fail to achieve its full potential. However, CCR in the Nigerian oil industry will be significantly improved if, and when, the needs and aspirations of the major stakeholders are addressed through a tri-sector partnership approach to development and conflict resolution. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and ERP Environment. [source]