Conflict

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Humanities and Social Sciences

Kinds of Conflict

  • agency conflict
  • armed conflict
  • child conflict
  • civil conflict
  • class conflict
  • communal conflict
  • community conflict
  • cultural conflict
  • current conflict
  • decisional conflict
  • dysfunctional conflict
  • ethical conflict
  • ethnic conflict
  • family conflict
  • financial conflict
  • goal conflict
  • high conflict
  • ideological conflict
  • intergroup conflict
  • internal conflict
  • international conflict
  • interparental conflict
  • interpersonal conflict
  • intralocu sexual conflict
  • iraq conflict
  • ireland conflict
  • kosovo conflict
  • local conflict
  • managing conflict
  • marital conflict
  • military conflict
  • moral conflict
  • national conflict
  • normative conflict
  • northern ireland conflict
  • organizational conflict
  • palestinian conflict
  • parental conflict
  • political conflict
  • potential conflict
  • protracted conflict
  • relationship conflict
  • religious conflict
  • resource conflict
  • role conflict
  • sexual conflict
  • social conflict
  • task conflict
  • value conflict
  • violent conflict
  • wildlife conflict
  • work-family conflict
  • workplace conflict

  • Terms modified by Conflict

  • conflict analysis
  • conflict avoidance
  • conflict behavior
  • conflict management
  • conflict process
  • conflict resolution
  • conflict resolution practice
  • conflict resolution strategy
  • conflict situation
  • conflict studies
  • conflict tactic scale
  • conflict task
  • conflict theory
  • conflict transformation
  • conflict zone

  • Selected Abstracts


    CONFLICT OF RIGHTS AND KEEPING ORDER

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 1 2002
    PAUL G. CHEVIGNY
    First page of article [source]


    PROTECTING THE INTEGRITY OF SHARED SCIENTIFIC KNOWLEDGE: IS THE CONFLICT OF INTEREST STATEMENT ENOUGH?

    ADDICTION, Issue 2 2010
    TANYA CHIKRITZHS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE CONFLICT BETWEEN INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND ABSTRACT SYSTEMS IN EDUCATION

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 2 2007
    Benjamin Endres
    Endres uses Anthony Giddens's account of "abstract systems" and "pure" relations to suggest that the tension that teachers face is not only the result of opposing ideologies or philosophies of teaching, but it is the product of conflicting undercurrents in modern social and economic life. Although there is no simple solution to the ambiguous and contested status of teaching, Endres points to two examples of how the interpersonal dimensions of teaching may gain recognition and support by the institutional system of schooling: research on the effects of class size and legal guarantees for individualized educational plans in the area of special education. He concludes by emphasizing the particular challenge of cultivating interpersonal relations for the most disadvantaged students. [source]


    CONFLICT OF INTEREST DECLARATIONS: COULD A ,TRAFFIC LIGHT' SYSTEM WORK?

    ADDICTION, Issue 11 2009
    ROBERT WEST
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE THAT SEXUAL CONFLICT INFLUENCES THE OPPORTUNITY, FORM AND INTENSITY OF SEXUAL SELECTION

    EVOLUTION, Issue 9 2008
    Matthew D. Hall
    Sexual interactions are often rife with conflict. Conflict between members of the same sex over opportunities to mate has long been understood to effect evolution via sexual selection. Although conflict between males and females is now understood to be widespread, such conflict is seldom considered in the same light as a general agent of sexual selection. Any interaction between males or females that generates variation in fitness, whether due to conflict, competition or mate choice, can potentially influence sexual selection acting on a range of male traits. Here we seek to address a lack of direct experimental evidence for how sexual conflict influences sexual selection more broadly. We manipulate a major source of sexual conflict in the black field cricket, Teleogryllus commodus, and quantify the resulting changes in the nature of sexual selection using formal selection analysis to statistically compare multivariate fitness surfaces. In T. commodus, sexual conflict occurs over the attachment time of an external spermatophore. By experimentally manipulating the ability of males and females to influence spermatophore attachment, we found that sexual conflict significantly influences the opportunity, form, and intensity of sexual selection on male courtship call and body size. When males were able to harass females, the opportunity for selection was smaller, the form of selection changed, and sexual selection was weaker. We discuss the broader evolutionary implications of these findings, including the contributions of sexual conflict to fluctuating sexual selection and the maintenance of additive genetic variation. [source]


    DO RECENT FINDINGS IN PLANT MITOCHONDRIAL MOLECULAR AND POPULATION GENETICS HAVE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE STUDY OF GYNODIOECY AND CYTONUCLEAR CONFLICT?

    EVOLUTION, Issue 5 2008
    David E. McCauley
    The coexistence of females and hermaphrodites in plant populations, or gynodioecy, is a puzzle recognized by Darwin. Correns identified cytoplasmic inheritance of one component of sex expression, now known as cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS). Lewis established cytonuclear inheritance of gynodioecy as an example of genetic conflict. Although biologists have since developed an understanding of the mechanisms allowing the joint maintenance of CMS and nuclear male fertility restorer genes, puzzles remain concerning the inheritance of sex expression and mechanisms governing the origination of CMS. Much of the theory of gynodioecy rests on the assumption of maternal inheritance of the mitochondrial genome. Here we review recent studies of the genetics of plant mitochondria, and their implications for the evolution and transmission of CMS. New studies of intragenomic recombination provide a plausible origin for the chimeric ORFs that characterize CMS. Moreover, evidence suggests that nonmaternal inheritance of mitochondria may be more common than once believed. These findings may have consequences for the maintenance of cytonuclear polymorphism, mitochondrial recombination, generation of gynomonoecious phenotypes, and interpretation of experimental crosses. Finally we point out that CMS can alter the nature of the cytonuclear conflict that may have originally selected for uniparental inheritance. [source]


    EVOLUTION UNDER RELAXED SEXUAL CONFLICT IN THE BULB MITE RHIZOGLYPHUS ROBINI

    EVOLUTION, Issue 9 2006
    Magdalena Tilszer
    Abstract The experimental evolution under different levels of sexual conflict have been used to demonstrate antagonistic coevolution in muscids, but among other taxa a similar approach has not been employed. Here, we describe the results of 37 generations of evolution under either experimentally enforced monogamy or polygamy in the bulb mite Rhizoglyphus robini. Three replicates were maintained for each treatment. Monogamy makes male and female interests congruent; thus selection is expected to decrease harmfulness of males to their partners. Our results were consistent with this prediction in that females from monogamous lines achieved lower fecundity when housed with males from polygamous lines. Fecundity of polygamous females was not affected by mating system under which their partners evolved, which suggests that they were more resistant to male-induced harm. As predicted by the antagonistic coevolution hypothesis, the decrease in harmfulness of monogamous males was accompanied by a decline in reproductive competitiveness. In contrast, female fecundity and embryonic viability, which were not expected to be correlated with male harmfulness, did not differ between monogamous and polygamous lines. None of the fitness components assayed differed between individuals obtained from crosses between parents from the same line and those obtained from crosses between parents from different lines within the same mating system. This indicates that inbreeding depression did not confound our results. However, interpretation of our results is complicated by the fact that both males and females from monogamous lines evolved smaller body size compared to individuals from polygamous lines. Although a decrease in reproductive performance of males from monogamous lines was still significant when body size was taken into account, we were not able to separate the effects of male body size and mating system in their influence on fecundity of their female partners. [source]


    SEXUAL CONFLICT AND CRYPTIC FEMALE CHOICE IN THE BLACK FIELD CRICKET, TELEOGRYLLUS COMMODUS

    EVOLUTION, Issue 4 2006
    Luc F. Bussiégre
    Abstract The prevalence and evolutionary consequences of cryptic female choice (CFC) remain highly controversial, not least because the processes underlying its expression are often concealed within the female reproductive tract. However, even when female discrimination is relatively easy to observe, as in numerous insect species with externally attached spermatophores, it is often difficult to demonstrate directional CFC for certain male phenotypes over others. Using a biological assay to separate male crickets into attractive or unattractive categories, we demonstrate that females strongly discriminate against unattractive males by removing their spermatophores before insemination can be completed. This results in significantly more sperm being transferred by attractive males than unattractive males. Males respond to CFC by mate guarding females after copulation, which increases the spermatophore retention of both attractive and unattractive males. Interestingly, unattractive males who suffered earlier interruption of sperm transfer benefited more from mate guarding, and they guarded females more vigilantly than attractive males. Our results suggest that postcopulatory mate guarding has evolved via sexual conflict over insemination times rather than through genetic benefits of biasing paternity toward vigorous males, as has been previously suggested. [source]


    SEX-RATIO CONFLICT BETWEEN QUEENS AND WORKERS IN EUSOCIAL HYMENOPTERA: MECHANISMS, COSTS, AND THE EVOLUTION OF SPLIT COLONY SEX RATIOS

    EVOLUTION, Issue 12 2005
    Ken R. Helms
    Abstract Because workers in the eusocial Hymenoptera are more closely related to sisters than to brothers, theory predicts that natural selection should act on them to bias (change) sex allocation to favor reproductive females over males. However, selection should also act on queens to prevent worker bias. We use a simulation approach to analyze the coevolution of this conflict in colonies with single, once-mated queens. We assume that queens bias the primary (egg) sex ratio and workers bias the secondary (adult) sex ratio, both at some cost to colony productivity. Workers can bias either by eliminating males or by directly increasing female caste determination. Although variation among colonies in kin structure is absent, simulations often result in bimodal (split) colony sex ratios. This occurs because of the evolution of two alternative queen or two alternative worker biasing strategies, one that biases strongly and another that does not bias at all. Alternative strategies evolve because the mechanisms of biasing result in accelerating benefits per unit cost with increasing bias, resulting in greater fitness for strategies that bias more and bias less than the population equilibrium. Strategies biasing more gain from increased biasing efficiency whereas strategies biasing less gain from decreased biasing cost. Our study predicts that whether queens or workers evolve alternative strategies depends upon the mechanisms that workers use to bias the sex ratio, the relative cost of queen and worker biasing, and the rates at which queen and worker strategies evolve. Our study also predicts that population and colony level sex allocation, as well as colony productivity, will differ diagnostically according to whether queens or workers evolve alternative biasing strategies and according to what mechanism workers use to bias sex allocation. [source]


    EVOLUTIONARY PATHWAYS IN SHOREBIRD BREEDING SYSTEMS: SEXUAL CONFLICT, PARENTAL CARE, AND CHICK DEVELOPMENT

    EVOLUTION, Issue 10 2005
    Gavin H. Thomas
    Abstract Sexual selection, mating opportunities, and parental behavior are interrelated, although the specific nature of these relationships is controversial. Two major hypotheses have been suggested. The parental investment hypothesis states that the relative parental investment of the sexes drives the operation of sexual selection. Thus, the sex that invests less in offspring care competes more intensely and monopolizes access to mates. The sexual conflict hypothesis proposes that sexual selection (the competition among both males and females for mates), mating opportunities, and parental behavior are interrelated and predicts a feedback loop between mating systems and parental care. Here we test both hypotheses using a comprehensive dataset of shorebirds, a maximum-likelihood statistical technique, and a recent supertree of extant shorebirds and allies. Shorebirds are an excellent group for these analyses because they display unique variation in parental care and social mating system. First, we show that chick development constrains the evolution of both parental care and mate competition, because transitions toward more precocial offspring preceded transitions toward reduced parental care and social polygamy. Second, changes in care and mating systems respond to one another, most likely because both influenced and are influenced by mating opportunities. Taken together, our results are more consistent with the sexual conflict hypothesis than the parental investment hypothesis. [source]


    SEXUAL CONFLICT AND PROTEIN POLYMORPHISM

    EVOLUTION, Issue 7 2004
    Ralph Haygood
    Abstract Sexual conflict, where male and female reproductive interests differ, is probably widespread and often mediated by male or sperm proteins and female or egg proteins that bind to each other during mating or fertilization. One potential consequence is maintenance of polymorphism in these proteins, which might result in reproductive isolation between sympatric subpopulations. I investigate the conditions for polymorphism maintenance in a series of mathematical models of sexual conflict over mating or fertilization frequency. The models represent a male or sperm ligand and a female or egg receptor, and they differ in whether expression of either protein is haploid or diploid. For diploid expression, the conditions imply that patterns of dominance, which involve neither overdominance nor un-derdominance, can determine whether polymorphism is maintained. For example, suppose ligand expression is diploid, and consider ligand alleles L1 and L2 in interactions with a given receptor genotype; if L1/L1 males are fitter than L2/L2 males in these interactions, then polymorphism is more likely to be maintained when L1/L2 males more closely resemble L1/L1 males in these interactions. Such fitter-allele dominance might be typical of a ligand or its receptor due to their biochemistry, in which case polymorphism might be typical of the pair. [source]


    PERSPECTIVE: SEXUAL CONFLICT AND SEXUAL SELECTION: CHASING AWAY PARADIGM SHIFTS

    EVOLUTION, Issue 6 2003
    TOMMASO PIZZARI
    Abstract., Traditional models of sexual selection propose that partner choice increases both average male and average female fitness in a population. Recent theoretical and empirical work, however, has stressed that sexual conflict may be a potent broker of sexual selection. When the fitness interests of males and females diverge, a reproductive strategy that increases the fitness of one sex may decrease the fitness of the other sex. The chase-away hypothesis proposes that sexual conflict promotes sexually antagonistic, rather than mutualistic, coevolution, whereby manipulative reproductive strategies in one sex are counteracted by the evolution of resistance to such strategies in the other sex. In this paper, we consider the criteria necessary to demonstrate the chase-away hypothesis. Specifically, we review sexual conflict with particular emphasis on the chase-away hypothesis; discuss the problems associated with testing the predictions of the chase-away hypothesis and the extent to which these predictions and the predictions of traditional models of sexual selection are mutually exclusive; discuss misconceptions and mismeasures of sexual conflict; and suggest an alternative approach to demonstrate sexual conflict, measure the intensity of sexually antagonistic selection in a population, and elucidate the coevolutionary trajectories of the sexes. [source]


    THE EVOLUTION OF FILIAL CANNIBALISM AND FEMALE MATE CHOICE STRATEGIES AS RESOLUTIONS TO SEXUAL CONFLICT IN FISHES

    EVOLUTION, Issue 2 2000
    Kai Lindström
    Abstract., Filial cannibalism (the consumption of one's own viable offspring) is common among fish with paternal care. In this study, I use a computer simulation to study simultaneous evolution of male filial cannibalism and female mate choice. Under certain conditions, selection on parental males favors filial cannibalism. When filial cannibalism increases a male's probability to raise the current brood successfully, filial cannibalism also benefits the female. However, when egg eating is a male investment into future reproduction, a conflict between female and male interests emerges. Here I investigate how female discrimination against filial cannibals affects evolution of filial cannibalism and how different female choice criteria perform against filial cannibalism. The introduction of discriminating females makes the fixation of filial cannibalism less likely. I introduced three different female choice criteria: (1) females who could discern a male's genotype, that is, whether the male was going to eat eggs as an investment in future reproductive events; (2) energy-choosing females that preferred to mate with males who had enough energy reserves to live through the current brood cycle without consuming eggs; and (3) females that preferred to mate with already mated males, that is, males with eggs in their nest. Genotype choice never coexisted with filial cannibals at fixation and filial cannibals were unable to invade a population with genotype-choosing females. Energy choice was successful only when males had high energy reserves and were less dependent on filial cannibalism as an alternative energy source. The egg choosers frequently coexisted with the cannibals at fixation. When the female strategies were entered simultaneously, the most frequent outcome for low mate sampling costs was that both the cannibals and the egg choice was fixed and all other strategies went extinct. These results suggest that sexual conflicts may not always evolve toward a resolution of the conflict, but sometimes the stable state retains the conflict. In the present case, this was because the egg-preference strategy had a higher fitness than the other female strategies. The outcome of this simulation is similar to empirical findings. In fish with paternal care, male filial cannibalism and female preference for mates with eggs commonly co-occur. [source]


    UNDERSTANDING TRADITIONALIST OPPOSITION TO MODERNIZATION: NARRATIVE PRODUCTION IN A NORWEGIAN MOUNTAIN CONFLICT

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 1 2008
    Tor A. Benjaminsen
    ABSTRACT. In Gausdal, a mountainous community in southern Norway, a conflict involving dogsledding has dominated local politics during the past two decades. In order to understand local protests against this activity, in this article we apply discourse analysis within the evolving approach of political ecology. In this way, we also aim at contributing to the emerging trend of bringing political ecology "home". To many people, dogsledding appears as an environmentally friendly outdoor recreation activity as well as a type of adventure tourism that may provide new income opportunities to marginal agricultural communities. Hence, at a first glance, the protests against this activity may be puzzling. Looking for explanations for these protests, this empirical study demonstrates how the opposition to dogsledding may be understood as grounded in four elements of a narrative: (1) environmental values are threatened; (2) traditional economic activities are threatened; (3) outsiders take over the mountain; and (4) local people are powerless. Furthermore, we argue that the narrative is part of what we see as a broader Norwegian "rural traditionalist discourse". This discourse is related to a continued marginalization of rural communities caused by increasing pressure on agriculture to improve its efficiency as well as an "environmentalization" of rural affairs. Thus, the empirical study shows how opposition to dogsledding in a local community is articulated as a narrative that fits into a more general pattern of opposition to rural modernization in Norway as well as internationally. [source]


    TOWARD CONSTRUCTING A DIALECTICS OF HARMONIZATION: HARMONY AND CONFLICT IN CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

    JOURNAL OF CHINESE PHILOSOPHY, Issue 2006
    CHUNG-YING CHENG
    [source]


    A REVIEW OF GEOLOGICAL DATA THAT CONFLICT WITH THE PARADIGM OF CATAGENIC GENERATION AND MIGRATION OF OIL

    JOURNAL OF PETROLEUM GEOLOGY, Issue 3 2005
    H. Hugh Wilson
    The majority of petroleum geologists today agree that the complex problems that surround the origin, generation, migration and accumulation of hydrocarbons can be resolved by accepting the geochemical conclusion that the process originates by catagenic generation in deeply-buried organically-rich source rocks. These limited source rock intervals are believed to expel hydrocarbons when they reach organic maturity in oil kitchens. The expelled oil and gas then follow migration pathways to traps at shallower levels. However, there are major geological obstacles that cast doubt upon this interpretation. The restriction of the source rock to a few organically rich levels in a basin forces the conclusion that the basin plumbing system is leaky and allows secondary horizontal and vertical migration through great thicknesses of consolidated sedimentary rocks in which there are numerous permeability barriers that are known to effectively prevent hydrocarbon escape from traps. The sourcing of lenticular traps points to the enclosing impermeable envelope as the logical origin of the trapped hydrocarbons. The lynch-pin of the catagenic theory of hydrocarbon origin is the expulsion mechanism from deeply-buried consolidated source rock under high confining pressures. This mechanism is not understood and is termed an "enigma". Assuming that expulsion does occur, the pathways taken by the hydrocarbons to waiting traps can be ascertained by computer modelling of the basin. However, subsurface and field geological support for purported migration pathways has yet to be provided. Many oilfield studies have shown that oil and gas are preferentially trapped in synchronous highs that were formed during, or very shortly after, the deposition of the charged reservoir. An unresolved problem is how catagenically generated hydrocarbons, expelled during a long-drawn-out maturation period, can have filled synchronous highs but have avoided later traps along the assumed migration pathways. From many oilfield studies, it has also been shown that the presence of hydrocarbons inhibits diagenesis and compaction of the reservoir rock. This "Füchtbauer effect" points to not only the early charging of clastic and carbonate reservoirs, but also to the development of permeability barriers below the early-formed accumulations. These barriers would prevent later hydrocarbon additions during the supposed extended period of expulsion from an oil kitchen. Early-formed traps that have been sealed diagenetically will retain their charge even if the trap is opened by later structural tilting. Diagenetic traps have been discovered in clastic and carbonate provinces but their recognition as viable exploration targets is discouraged by present-day assumptions of late hydrocarbon generation and a leaky basin plumbing system. Because there are so many geological realities that cast doubt upon the assumptions that devolve from the paradigm of catagenic generation, the alternative concept of early biogenic generation and accumulation of immature oil, with in-reservoir cracking during burial, is again worthy of serious consideration. This concept envisages hydrocarbon generation by bacterial activity in many anoxic environments and the charging of synchronous highs from adjacent sources. The resolution of the fundamental problem of hydrocarbon generation and accumulation, which is critical to exploration strategies, should be sought in the light of a thorough knowledge of the geologic factors involved, rather than by computer modelling which may be guided by questionable geochemical assumptions. [source]


    II. INTERACTIONS AMONG MARITAL CONFLICT, SYMPATHETIC, AND PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEMS ACTIVITY IN THE PREDICTION OF CHILDREN'S EXTERNALIZING PROBLEMS

    MONOGRAPHS OF THE SOCIETY FOR RESEARCH IN CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 1 2009
    Article first published online: 18 MAR 200
    First page of article [source]


    ROLE CONFLICT AND FLEXIBLE WORK ARRANGEMENTS: THE EFFECTS ON APPLICANT ATTRACTION

    PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2002
    BARBARA L. RAU
    This paper challenges a popular assumption that organizations with flexible work arrangements are more attractive to job seekers than those with a standard work arrangement. Drawing on boundary theory, we suggest that the attractiveness of these arrangements depends in part on job seekers' interrole conflict. Subjects were 142 MBA students at a midsized midwestern university. Those with high role conflict were more attracted to an organization when flextime was offered than when it was not. Those with low role conflict, however, were just slightly less attracted to an organization when flextime was offered. Conversely, subjects with low role conflict were more attracted to an organization when telecommuting was offered than when it was not; subjects with high role conflict were indifferent. These results suggest that organizations should understand the needs of their targeted applicant pool and carefully consider recruitment implications of work arrangements when analyzing costs associated with these policies. [source]


    RADICAL MARTYRDOM AND COSMIC CONFLICT IN EARLY CHRISTIANITY , By Paul Middleton

    RELIGIOUS STUDIES REVIEW, Issue 2 2008
    Michael W. Holmes
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    DISTRIBUTIONAL CONFLICT, POLITICAL CYCLES AND GROWTH

    THE MANCHESTER SCHOOL, Issue 4 2005
    CHRISTIANE CLEMENS
    This paper discusses the emergence of endogenous redistributive cycles in a stochastic growth model with incomplete asset markets and heterogeneous agents who vote on the degree of progressivity in the tax-transfer scheme. The model draws from Bénabou (in B. S. Bernanke and J. J. Rotemberg (eds), NBER Macroeconomics Annual, Vol. 11, Cambridge, MA, MIT Press, pp. 11,74) and ties the bias in the distribution of political power to the degree of inequality in the society, thereby triggering redistributive cycles which then give rise to a nonlinear, cyclical pattern of savings rates, growth and inequality over time. [source]


    RISING FOOD PRICES, SOCIAL MOBILIZATIONS, AND VIOLENCE: CONCEPTUAL ISSUES IN UNDERSTANDING AND RESPONDING TO THE CONNECTIONS LINKING HUNGER AND CONFLICT

    ANNALS OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL PRACTICE, Issue 1 2009
    Ellen Messer
    In 2008, the world confronted food-insecurity situations that provoked political demonstrations in more than 50 countries. The alleged sources were production failures and spiking food prices because of bad weather and flawed food and development policies. But additional contributors were the legacies of food wars, armed conflicts in which one or both sides use food (or hunger) as a weapon and in which hunger persists as a consequence of conflict and its attendant social-economic disruptions. This article argues that UN and NGO international and national agencies responding to food insecurity challenges in particular places must consider food-and-conflict scenarios, and adopt conflict-concerned strategies, which are sensitive to the ways in which past foodwars have stymied increases in agricultural production, marketing, and livelihood diversification. Policy makers should also be attentive to political-geographic-ethnic-religious (PGER) divisions that can skew government distributions and access to aid and potentiate additional conflict. [source]


    THE SOCCER WARS: HISPANIC IMMIGRANTS IN CONFLICT AND ADAPTATION AT THE SOCCER BORDERZONE

    ANNALS OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL PRACTICE, Issue 1 2009
    Tim Wallace
    Soccer is a worldwide sport with fervent fans across the United States, Mexico, and Central America. Recent Hispanic arrivals in the United States find common ground with U.S. American soccer fans, but social and cultural issues are still barriers to better relationships among Hispanics and non-Hispanic residents. Using the concept of "soccer borderzone," I relate the ways in which futból (soccer) is a mechanism by which immigrants from Latin America can relax and adapt to life in their new communities. This article discusses the underlying issues that bring together and divide soccer fans in the Research Triangle region of North Carolina (Raleigh, Chapel Hill, and Durham). It also illustrates different cultural norms in the organization of league play. I use my eight-year experience as the president of a Hispanic Soccer League, La Liga de Raleigh, to explain the cultural norms of Hispanic participation in league play while feeling the effects of being an outsider in a new community. This article concludes by suggesting that in spite of common ground among soccer fans North and South, the recent spike in anti-immigrant rhetoric accompanied by the sinking of the American economy has slowed the process of integration within the soccer borderzone. [source]


    PERSPECTIVES OF BELIEFS AND VALUES ARE NOT CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

    ADDICTION, Issue 4 2010
    CHRISTOPHER C. H. COOK
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    CONTEMPLATING TEACHING'S CONFLICTS AND PARADOXES

    EDUCATIONAL THEORY, Issue 1 2010
    Daniel P. Liston
    First page of article [source]


    DISCLOSING CONFLICTS OF INTEREST: COMMON STANDARDS IN UNCOMMON CONTEXTS

    ADDICTION, Issue 11 2009
    ISIDORE S. OBOT
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    DINOPHYTE REPRODUCTION: PROGRESS AND CONFLICTS

    JOURNAL OF PHYCOLOGY, Issue 4 2003
    M. Elbrächter
    First page of article [source]


    DO MARKETS PENALIZE AGENCY CONFLICTS BETWEEN CONTROLLING AND MINORITY SHAREHOLDERS?

    THE DEVELOPING ECONOMIES, Issue 3 2007
    EVIDENCE FROM CHILE
    G32; G34; O16 Using a sample of Chilean listed firms with widespread presence of economic conglomerates that use pyramid structures to control affiliated companies, we find that firms where controlling shareholders have higher coincidence between cash and control rights are persistently more valued by the market. We carefully check that our results are not driven by omitted variable biases and control for reverse causation using a feature of Chilean Corporations Law that provides an exogenous instrument for ownership concentration. [source]


    POLITICAL LIBERALIZATION OR ARMED CONFLICTS?

    THE DEVELOPING ECONOMIES, Issue 2 2007
    COLD WAR AFRICA, POLITICAL CHANGES IN POST
    F5 The African political scene after the end of the Cold War has been characterized by two major issues: the development of political liberalization and frequent outbreaks of armed conflict. The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the relationship between these two issues. Although political liberalization cannot directly explain the outbreak of armed conflicts, the relationship can be understood by taking patrimonial characteristics of the post-colonial African states into account. The economic crisis and the change of the international environment after the 1980s compelled African states to launch the transformation, during which three results emerged: countries advancing successfully toward transformation into "polyarchy"; countries having fallen into severe armed conflicts; and countries in which authoritarian rulers managed to survive through introducing superficial measures of political liberalization. The characteristics of political change after the end of the Cold War can be therefore understood as transition processes of the post-colonial African states. [source]


    AGENCY CONFLICTS IN DELEGATED PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT: EVIDENCE FROM NAMESAKE MUTUAL FUNDS

    THE JOURNAL OF FINANCIAL RESEARCH, Issue 4 2007
    Stephen P. Ferris
    Abstract Namesake funds provide a unique sample for studying the two agency conflicts that exist within a mutual fund. The first is between the fund management company and fund shareholders, and the second is between the fund management company and the fund manager. A typical namesake fund manager sits on his or her fund's board, frequently as the chairman, is the majority owner of the fund management company, and has significant investments in the fund he or she manages. Our results indicate that namesake funds charge higher fees, suggesting that the boards of namesake funds are less effective. We find that namesake funds are more tax efficient, consistent with the idea that managerial ownership helps align the interests of managers with those of shareholders. Because of fewer career concerns, namesake fund managers herd less while assuming greater unsystematic risk. We find weak evidence that namesake fund managers outperform their benchmarks and peers. Finally, we observe that namesake funds attract higher levels of investor cash flow. [source]


    DECLARATION OF CONFLICTS OF INTEREST: The Journal of Sexual Medicine Editorial Board Declaration of Conflicts of Interest

    THE JOURNAL OF SEXUAL MEDICINE, Issue 1 2009
    Article first published online: 8 JAN 200
    [source]