College Women (college + woman)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Fashioning the College Woman: Dress, Gender, and Sexuality at Smith College in the 1920s

THE JOURNAL OF AMERICAN CULTURE, Issue 1 2009
Kendra Van Cleave
First page of article [source]


Obesity and Physical Activity in College Women: Implications for Clinical Practice

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 7 2004
APRN-BC, Jacquelyn M. Clement PhD
Purpose To investigate the relationships between levels of physical activity, health attitudes and behaviors, and specific health indicators in women attending college. Data Sources A convenience sample of 116 college women, ages 18 to 24 years, participated in this research study at a moderate-sized midwestern university. The data were obtained through self-administered questionnaire; trained technicians collected physiological measurements. Conclusions The young women in this study had, on average, normal body mass indexes (BMIs) and reported activity levels consistent with or greater than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American College of Sports Medicine guidelines. Items used to assign participants into the appropriate stage of the transtheoretical model of change were correlated with participants' perceived personal physical activity levels. Similarly, the participants, whose scores fell in the higher stages of the transtheoretical model, reported greater levels of physical activity; consumption of more fruits, vegetables, and water; and less consumption of high-fat/high-calorie foods. Implications for Practice The years between ages 18 and 24 are a critical time in the lives of young women. During this period, they develop physical activity and nutrition habits that will affect their health across the life span. Because of the sometimes insidious development of major health problems, young women's current health status may not accurately reflect the possible longterm results of negative health habits. Nurse practitioners (NPs) have many opportunities to identify and address major factors that, if unattended, may threaten the life-long health status of women. Health teaching in the areas of physical activity and dietary habits may be useful even in young women who appear to be healthy, are of normal weight, and are physically active.Poor dietary habits, if unattended, may eventually contribute to the development of obesity and related illnesses. [source]


Effect of the Amount of Hours Spent Studying on the Prevalence of Overactive Bladder in College Women

LUTS, Issue 2 2010
Dong Gil SHIN
Objectives: We conducted a questionnaire survey to access whether the amount of hours spent studying has an effect on the prevalence of OAB in college women. Methods: A total of 126 (63%; mean: 23.2 years) of 200 women participants completed the questionnaire. They were divided into two groups: group A (weekly studying hour >40 h) consisted of medical female students and group B (weekly studying hour <25 h) consisted of French literature woman students. The factors related to OAB were analyzed by the chi-squared test. Results: Of 126 respondents, the prevalence of OAB was prevalent in 38 (30.2%) women. There was significant difference in prevalence between the two groups: 7.0% for group A and 42.2% for group B. In group B, OAB prevalence was 66.7% for ,2 h, 41.2% for 2,,4 h, 46.5% for 4,,6 h, and >6 h was 23.5%. This survey showed that there is no relationship between the amount of hours spent studying and OAB. Conclusion: Although the amount of hours spent studying had no association with OAB in college women, OAB prevalence showed a decreasing pattern as the quantity of studying hour increases. Consequently, it is thought that the attitude toward study has more association with OAB than the quantity of studying hours. [source]


Dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program: A preliminary dismantling investigation

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 1 2006
Megan Roehrig MA
Abstract Objective A dissonance-based program aimed at reducing thin-ideal internalization has been found to significantly decrease levels of bulimic symptoms in young adult and adolescent females. Because this program is multifaceted, containing psychoeducation, counterattitudinal advocacy, and behavioral exposure components, the current study sought to investigate the mechanisms involved in symptom reduction. Method The current study compared the original treatment program with a dismantled version of the full package, which consisted solely of the specific dissonance component (i.e., the counterattitudinal advocacy procedure). Seventy-eight women were randomly assigned to either the full treatment condition or the counterattitudinal advocacy condition. Results Findings suggest that both interventions significantly reduced established risk factors for eating pathology as well as bulimic symptoms at termination and at 1-month follow-up. Conclusion Both treatments appear to be equally effective at reducing eating pathology in at-risk college women. Limitations of the study are discussed, and directions for future research are offered. 2005 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Dissonance thin-ideal and didactic healthy behavior eating disorder prevention programs: Results from a controlled trial

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 4 2004
Jill Anne Matusek
Abstract Objective Negative body image, a common problem among college-age women in the United States, strongly correlates with low self-esteem, disturbed eating behavior, and eating disorders. Psychoeducational programs have inconsistently shown improvement in body image, thin-ideal internalization, eating behaviors, psychosocial functioning, and self-esteem. Method In the current study, college women with body image concerns (N = 84) were randomly assigned to a cognitive dissonance-based, thin-ideal internalization, single-session workshop (DTI; n = 26); a psychoeducational, healthy behavior, single-session workshop (HB; n = 24); or a wait-list control (WL; n = 34). Results Comparing baseline data with 4-week follow-up data, results indicated that both DTI and HB participants reported improvement in body image, thin-ideal internalization, and eating behaviors. Discussion Results provide evidence that both interventions effectively reduce risk factors for eating pathology. 2004 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Int J Eat Disord 36: 376,388, 2004. [source]


ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Lessons from families and communities about interpersonal violence, victimization, and seeking help

JOURNAL OF FORENSIC NURSING, Issue 3 2010
Angela Frederick Amar PhD
Abstract Despite significant incidence and physical and mental health consequences, most college-age women do not tell anyone about experiences of interpersonal violence. Limited research explores the sociocultural context of seeking help related to violence in young women. The overall purpose of this research was to understand socially and culturally relevant factors associated with violence help seeking in college women. Eight focus groups were held with 64 participants. Narrative analysis was the primary method of analysis. Four qualitative categories emerged from the data: "Learning from one's mother"; "We're strong women; we fight"; "We didn't talk about it"; and "Where I'm from." Findings suggest that help seeking is influenced by the messages from and experiences of mothers and extended family members. An understanding of familial and cultural determinants of help seeking is essential for relevant and effective prevention efforts. [source]


Factors affecting the next generation of women leaders: Mapping the challenges, antecedents, and consequences of effective leadership

JOURNAL OF LEADERSHIP STUDIES, Issue 2 2009
Rene P. McEldowney
This article introduces a conceptual model for understanding how young women perceive the current challenges of leadership. Numerous studies and articles claim that women are better educated, more experienced, and better suited for leadership positions than ever before. This news is encouraging, but the number of women in leadership roles in American politics gained less than one percentage point this year, hovering around 22%, while in the private sector many organizations have yet to place a single woman on their board. The proportion of women on corporate boards is 16%, with no evidence that this is likely to grow in the near future. What is even more discouraging is that these low numbers are not significantly higher than those in many developing nations. It is evident that women are underrepresented in top leadership positions and must intensely challenge the status quo. This article presents results of a study based on in-depth interviews with college women who are seeking paths to leadership. The researchers employ qualitative analytical research tools to explore the complexities of the phenomena. The findings bring a greater understanding of the antecedents and consequences that lie beneath the challenges affecting the next generation of women leaders. [source]


Everyday Sexism: Evidence for Its Incidence, Nature, and Psychological Impact From Three Daily Diary Studies

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, Issue 1 2001
Janet K. Swim
Three daily diary studies were conducted to examine the incidence, nature, and impact of everyday sexism as reported by college women and men. Women experienced about one to two impactful sexist incidents per week, consisting of traditional gender role stereotypes and prejudice, demeaning and degrading comments and behaviors, and sexual objectification. These incidents affected women's psychological well-being by decreasing their comfort, increasing their feelings of anger and depression, and decreasing their state self-esteem. Although the experiences had similar effects on men's anger, depression, and state self-esteem, men reported relatively fewer sexist incidents, suggesting less overall impact on men. The results provide evidence for the phenomena of everyday prejudice and enlighten our understanding of the experience of prejudice in interpersonal encounters from the perspective of the target. [source]


Obesity and Physical Activity in College Women: Implications for Clinical Practice

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF NURSE PRACTITIONERS, Issue 7 2004
APRN-BC, Jacquelyn M. Clement PhD
Purpose To investigate the relationships between levels of physical activity, health attitudes and behaviors, and specific health indicators in women attending college. Data Sources A convenience sample of 116 college women, ages 18 to 24 years, participated in this research study at a moderate-sized midwestern university. The data were obtained through self-administered questionnaire; trained technicians collected physiological measurements. Conclusions The young women in this study had, on average, normal body mass indexes (BMIs) and reported activity levels consistent with or greater than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/American College of Sports Medicine guidelines. Items used to assign participants into the appropriate stage of the transtheoretical model of change were correlated with participants' perceived personal physical activity levels. Similarly, the participants, whose scores fell in the higher stages of the transtheoretical model, reported greater levels of physical activity; consumption of more fruits, vegetables, and water; and less consumption of high-fat/high-calorie foods. Implications for Practice The years between ages 18 and 24 are a critical time in the lives of young women. During this period, they develop physical activity and nutrition habits that will affect their health across the life span. Because of the sometimes insidious development of major health problems, young women's current health status may not accurately reflect the possible longterm results of negative health habits. Nurse practitioners (NPs) have many opportunities to identify and address major factors that, if unattended, may threaten the life-long health status of women. Health teaching in the areas of physical activity and dietary habits may be useful even in young women who appear to be healthy, are of normal weight, and are physically active.Poor dietary habits, if unattended, may eventually contribute to the development of obesity and related illnesses. [source]


Effect of the Amount of Hours Spent Studying on the Prevalence of Overactive Bladder in College Women

LUTS, Issue 2 2010
Dong Gil SHIN
Objectives: We conducted a questionnaire survey to access whether the amount of hours spent studying has an effect on the prevalence of OAB in college women. Methods: A total of 126 (63%; mean: 23.2 years) of 200 women participants completed the questionnaire. They were divided into two groups: group A (weekly studying hour >40 h) consisted of medical female students and group B (weekly studying hour <25 h) consisted of French literature woman students. The factors related to OAB were analyzed by the chi-squared test. Results: Of 126 respondents, the prevalence of OAB was prevalent in 38 (30.2%) women. There was significant difference in prevalence between the two groups: 7.0% for group A and 42.2% for group B. In group B, OAB prevalence was 66.7% for ,2 h, 41.2% for 2,,4 h, 46.5% for 4,,6 h, and >6 h was 23.5%. This survey showed that there is no relationship between the amount of hours spent studying and OAB. Conclusion: Although the amount of hours spent studying had no association with OAB in college women, OAB prevalence showed a decreasing pattern as the quantity of studying hour increases. Consequently, it is thought that the attitude toward study has more association with OAB than the quantity of studying hours. [source]


Personal, academic, and career counseling of African American women in college settings

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR STUDENT SERVICES, Issue 104 2003
Madonna G. Constantine
This chapter provides information about personal, academic, and vocational concerns of African American college women and offers culturally relevant counseling frameworks and interventions for working with this population. [source]