College Programs (college + program)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


ECOSYSTEM MODELING: A TOOL TO UNDERSTAND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN EXTRACTIVE AND FED AQUACULTURE

JOURNAL OF PHYCOLOGY, Issue 2001
Article first published online: 24 SEP 200
Yarish, C. 1, Rawson, Jr. M. V.2, Chopin, T.3, Wang, D. R.4, Chen, C.4, Carmona, R.1, Chen, C.5 , Wang, L.4, Ji , R.5 and Sullivan, J.5 1University of Connecticut, Stamford, Connecticut 06901-2315, USA; 2Georgia Sea Grant College Program, Athens, GA 30602-3636, USA; 3University of New Brunswick, Saint John, NB, E2L 4L5, Canada; 4Marine and Fishery Dept. of Hainan Province, Haikou, Hainan, P. R. China; 5The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-3636, USA One of the most difficult tasks resource managers face is understanding the carrying capacity of coastal waters for aquaculture. Aquaculture, like many other human activities, can threaten coastal waters. Aquaculture producing shrimp and finfish depends on supplemental feeding and can contribute to eutrophication. A second type, involving shellfish and macroalgae, extracts plankton and nutrients from surrounding waters, and can have a significant positive impact on moderately eutrophic waters. Ecosystem modeling offers a 3-dimensional physical, chemical and biological simulation that can help understand and predict the impacts of aquaculture on coastal embayments. Such a model is being explored for Xincun Bay (22 km2), which is located in southeastern Hainan Province, China. Aquaculture in Xincun Bay includes 6500 fish pens, 100 ha of shrimp ponds, pearl oyster culture rafts and Kappaphycus alvarezii culture that produces 2,000 mt (Oct.-May). The surrounding area has ~ 15,000 people and Xincun City is a major offshore fishing and tourist center. The annual nitrogen and phosphorus removal capacity of Kappaphycus in Xincun Bay may have been in the order of 53.8 and 3.7 mt, respectively, during the 1999-2000 growing season. Lian Bay (~ 15 km2), a nearby bay with only Kappaphycus and pearl oyster culture (and little anthropogenic input), has a macroalgal production of 1,500 mt annually. The annual nitrogen and phosphorus removal capacity of Kappaphycus here may have been in the order of 25 and 0.33 mt, respectively. Our prototype model may hold the promise for showing the importance of integrating seaweed culture activities in the maintenance and health of coastal embayments. [source]


A longitudinal study of the educational and career trajectories of female participants of an urban informal science education program

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 8 2004
Kathleen A. Fadigan
The purpose of this longitudinal case study is to describe the educational trajectories of a sample of 152 young women from urban, low-income, single-parent families who participated in the Women in Natural Sciences (WINS) program during high school. Utilizing data drawn from program records, surveys, and interviews, this study also attempts to determine how the program affected the participants' educational and career choices to provide insight into the role informal science education programs play in increasing the participation of women and minorities in science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET)-related fields. Findings revealed 109 participants (93.16%) enrolled in a college program following high school completion. Careers in medical or health-related fields followed by careers in SMET emerged as the highest ranking career paths with 24 students (23.76%) and 21 students (20.79%), respectively, employed in or pursuing careers in these areas. The majority of participants perceived having staff to talk to, the job skills learned, and having the museum as a safe place to go as having influenced their educational and career decisions. These findings reflect the need for continued support of informal science education programs for urban girls and at-risk youth. © 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 41: 835,860, 2004 [source]


Lessons from community college programs targeting welfare recipients

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES, Issue 127 2004
Edwin Meléndez
Many community colleges have pursued aggressive initiatives to serve students on welfare, creating new academic programs or expanding existing ones. This chapter highlights case studies of best practices that illustrate how institutional initiatives targeting welfare students have resulted in an expanded capacity to educate and serve mainstream students. [source]


Taking the Golden State Path to Teacher Education: California Partnerships Among Two-Year Colleges and University Centers

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR COMMUNITY COLLEGES, Issue 121 2003
Linda Serra Hagedorn
This chapter describes the current teacher credentialing situation in California, the community college Teacher and Reading Development Partnership (TRDP) program, and six California community college programs dedicated to the elimination of an acute teacher shortage. [source]