College Graduates (college + graduate)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


PERSPECTIVE: TEACHING EVOLUTION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

EVOLUTION, Issue 10 2002
Brian J. Alters
Abstract., In the past decade, the academic community has increased considerably its activity concerning the teaching and learning of evolution. Despite such beneficial activity, the state of public understanding of evolution is considered woefully lacking by most researchers and educators. This lack of understanding affects evolution/science literacy, research, and academia in general. Not only does the general public lack an understanding of evolution but so does a considerable proportion of college graduates. However, it is not just evolutionary concepts that students do not retain. In general, college students retain little of what they supposedly have learned. Worse yet, it is not just students who have avoided science and math who fail to retain fundamental science concepts. Students who have had extensive secondary-level and college courses in science have similar deficits. We examine these issues and explore what distinguishes effective pedagogy from ineffective pedagogy in higher education in general and evolution education in particular. The fundamental problem of students' prior conceptions is considered and why prior conceptions often underpin students' misunderstanding of the evolutionary concepts being taught. These conceptions can often be discovered and addressed. We also attend to concerns about coverage of course content and the influence of religious beliefs, and provide helpful strategies to improve college-level teaching of evolution. [source]


The Distributional Impact of Pension System Reforms: An Application to the Italian Case

FISCAL STUDIES, Issue 4 2004
MARGHERITA BORELLA
Between 1992 and 1995, the Italian pension system was deeply reformed, and it is now moving from an earnings-related to a contribution-based scheme. The pre-1992 system was generous and redistributive; however, often redistribution operated from the poor to the rich, notably because the benefit formula was based on the last years of earnings, thus benefiting workers with steep earnings profiles. The new contribution-based scheme may enhance equity by removing (some of) the inequities implicit in the previous system. Simulations calibrated on Italian male employees show that the contribution-based scheme reduces inequality among all groups considered, with the exception of college graduates employed in the private sector. When taking into account the average level of the benefit as well as its distribution, the analysis shows mixed results depending on the worker's number of years of contribution and on their retirement age, as well as on the steepness of their earnings profile. [source]


Property Rights and Public Interests: A Wyoming Agricultural Lands Study

GROWTH AND CHANGE, Issue 1 2002
Katherine Inman
Rocky Mountain states have experienced unprecedented growth as agricultural land is converted to residences. Preservation efforts meet with protest from private landholders claiming public efforts undermine private property rights. This paper explores the degree to which respondents think management of agricultural lands is a public versus a private matter. Data are from a Sublette County, Wyoming, mail survey. Results are relevant to many western counties having public lands and high growth rates. They suggest that landowners, wage earners, college graduates, and those who value the county's rural community lifestyle support public management strategies. Well-established residents and those with economic reasons for living in the county support private management strategies. [source]


Understanding the experience of college graduates during their first year of employment

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2004
Janet L. Polach
A company's college recruitment practices, as well as its socialization processes for graduates once they have joined the organization, can be improved when there is understanding of college graduates' experience during the first year of employment. This study recorded the experiences of eight college graduates who were employed by a medical device manufacturer in the Midwest. Nine themes common to all participants are identified and grouped into three categories: work environment, friendship, and performance. Related research on college graduates and first-job experiences, Generations X and Y, job expectations, and new-hire socialization is also reviewed. Recommendations are offered for consideration by the organization that employs the study's participants to improve college graduates' experience. Further research implications are also discussed. [source]


Invited reaction: Understanding the experience of college graduates during their first year of employment

HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY, Issue 1 2004
Rich Shintaku
First page of article [source]


Globalisation and outsourcing: confronting new human resource challenges in India's business process outsourcing industry

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS JOURNAL, Issue 2 2010
Sarosh Kuruvilla
ABSTRACT In this article, we argue that the rapid growth of the outsourcing industry has resulted in both high turnover and labour shortages and at the same time provided employment opportunities to a new group of employees: young upwardly mobile college graduates. We argue that this particular demographic profile is prone to high turnover and presents new managerial challenges. We then examine the variety of recruitment and retention strategies that companies in the business process outsourcing industry are experimenting with and show that many novel HR strategies are being crafted to address the needs of this young middle-class workforce. We also examine macro efforts by state and central governments and the industry association to help resolve some of these problems. [source]


Emotional stability of nurses: impact on patient safety

JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 10 2009
Ching-I Teng
Abstract Title.,Emotional stability of nurses: impact on patient safety. Aim., This paper is a report of a study conducted to examine the influence of the emotional stability of nurses on patient safety. Background., Individuals with greater emotional stability are less likely to exhibit strong emotional reactions to stressful situations, and tend to be more proactive and successful in problem-solving. Effectively managing patient safety is a priority concern in countries where nurses face high pressure. A heavy work load leads to burnout (a syndrome associated with negative emotions), reduced job satisfaction and increased turnover. While emotional stability influences job performance in various contexts, its influence on patient safety has not been addressed. Method., A cross-sectional design was adopted. The sample comprised 263 nurses working in two Taiwanese medical centres. The data were collected in 2007,2008, with a response rate of 926%. All participants were nursing college graduates aged below 50 years. Participants provided information on both their emotional stability and patient safety. Staffing adequacy, hospital, and years of nursing experience served as control variables. Findings., Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that emotional stability predicted patient safety (, = 018, P < 001). The addition of emotional stability as a predictor of patient safety increased the associated explained variance (,R2 = 003, P < 001). Conclusion., It is important for to managers create an organisational climate that promotes the emotional stability of nurses. This could help to improve global patient safety by reducing the frequency of adverse events. [source]


GOING ONLINE WITHOUT EASY ACCESS: A TALE OF THREE CITIES

JOURNAL OF URBAN AFFAIRS, Issue 5 2008
KAREN MOSSBERGER
ABSTRACT:,Building on a national study that showed that concentrated poverty matters for the "digital divide," this research compares the influence of the neighborhood-level context in three cities that vary in racial composition and income. We use a 2005 random digit-dialed survey of respondents in Northeast Ohio communities, and find unexpectedly that residents in areas of concentrated poverty demonstrate efforts to go online despite lacking home or work access. We analyze the results using regression models that include contextual "buffers" that create a unique geography for each respondent within a half-kilometer radius. Respondents who live in areas with a high percentage of African Americans or college graduates are more likely to go online even if they lack convenient Internet access, although the percentage of college graduates has a greater effect. At the neighborhood level, race and education influence the context for technology use. [source]


Who Wants to Work for the Government?

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION REVIEW, Issue 4 2002
Gregory B. Lewis
In an era when everyone wants to be a millionaire, governments struggle to attract and retain highly qualified employees, making it more important than ever to understand what attracts people to the public service. Using contingency table analysis and logistic regression on the 1989 and 1998 General Social Surveys, we explore how individuals' demographic characteristics and the importance they place on various job qualities influence their preference for and employment in the public sector. Job security may still be the strongest attraction of government jobs, but high income and the opportunity to be useful to society also attract some Americans to the public service. Minorities, veterans, Democrats, and older Americans preferred public-sector jobs more than whites, nonveterans, Republicans, and younger Americans, who were otherwise similar. Women and college graduates were more likely than comparable men and less-educated respondents to have government jobs, but no more likely to prefer them. Overall, desire for government jobs declined markedly between 1989 and 1998. [source]


A COHORT ANALYSIS OF US AGE,EARNINGS PROFILES

BULLETIN OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH, Issue 2 2008
Kosei Fukuda
J31; C51 ABSTRACT Aggregate data on US earnings, classified by period and by age, are decomposed into age, period and cohort effects, using the Bayesian cohort models, which were developed to overcome the identification problem in cohort analysis. The main findings, obtained by comparing college and high school graduates, are threefold. First, the age effects show a downward trend for the age group of 45,49 onwards for high school graduates but do not show any such trend for college graduates. Second, the period effects show a downward trend for high school graduates but reveal no such trend for college graduates. Third, the cohort effects are negligible for both college and high school graduates. [source]