Class Status (class + status)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Scaling the Socioeconomic Ladder: Low-Income Women's Perceptions of Class Status and Opportunity

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, Issue 4 2003
Heather E. Bullock
This study examined how 69 low-income women enrolled in an educational training program perceived social class and upward mobility. Participants identified their social class during childhood, their current status, and their anticipated post graduate status. Beliefs about income inequality and attributions for wealth and poverty were also assessed. Respondents expected to achieve middle class status and perceived higher education as a route to upward mobility, although the accessibility of post-secondary programs was questioned. Consistent with previous research involving low-income groups (Bullock, 1999; Kluegel & Smith, 1986), structural attributions for poverty and wealth were favored over individualistic causes. Also, respondents perceived income inequality as unjust. The construction of class identity and implications for class-based mobilization are discussed. It [the American dream] means the opportunity to go as far in life as your abilities will take you. Anyone in America can aspire to be a doctor, a teacher, a police officer or even, as Oprah said, a President. But you can't get any of those important jobs if you don't have the opportunity to acquire the skills you need , . And that's why I believe that the key to the American Dream is education. ,,,,,Former President George Herbert Walker Bush, 1997 [source]


CONSUMING CLASS: Multilevel Marketers in Neoliberal Mexico

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Issue 3 2008
PETER S. CAHN
ABSTRACT Since the 1980s, Mexican leaders have followed other Latin American countries in pursuing neoliberal economic policies designed to stimulate foreign investment, reduce public spending, and promote free trade. Recent studies of indigenous movements and popular protests challenge the idea that these market-based economic reforms enjoy a broad consensus and suggest that elites impose them by force. By turning the focus to middle-class Mexicans, I argue that some nonelite sectors of society avidly welcome the reign of the free market. Although they do not profit directly from unregulated capitalism, the middle class looks to neoliberalism to ensure access to the material markers of class status. The rising popularity of multilevel marketing companies in Mexico, which glorify consumption and celebrate the possibilities of entrepreneurship, demonstrates the appeal of neoliberalism to citizens fearful of diminished purchasing power. By tying consumption to globalized free markets, neoliberalism does not need coercion to win acceptance. [source]


Pathways of Youth Development in a Rural Trailer Park,

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2006
Katherine A. MacTavish
Abstract: Limited empirical documentation exists for the developmental pathways available to rural youth growing up in low-resource community settings. Drawing on ethnographic data, this article examines the developmental pathways experienced by youth in a rural trailer park. Findings reveal how various factors, some inherent to working poor class status and others unique to trailer park residence and small town community, challenge youth's access to a pathway offering broader life chances. [source]


On bivalve phylogeny: a high-level analysis of the Bivalvia (Mollusca) based on combined morphology and DNA sequence data

INVERTEBRATE BIOLOGY, Issue 4 2002
Gonzalo Giribet
Abstract. Bivalve classification has suffered in the past from the crossed-purpose discussions among paleontologists and neontologists, and many have based their proposals on single character systems. More recently, molecular biologists have investigated bivalve relationships by using only gene sequence data, ignoring paleontological and neontological data. In the present study we have compiled morphological and anatomical data with mostly new molecular evidence to provide a more stable and robust phylogenetic estimate for bivalve molluscs. The data here compiled consist of a morphological data set of 183 characters, and a molecular data set from 3 loci: 2 nuclear ribosomal genes (18S rRNA and 28S rRNA), and 1 mitochondrial coding gene (cytochrome c oxidase subunit I), totaling ,3 Kb of sequence data for 76 molluscs (62 bivalves and 14 outgroup taxa). The data have been analyzed separately and in combination by using the direct optimization method of Wheeler (1996), and they have been evaluated under 12 analytical schemes. The combined analysis supports the monophyly of bivalves, paraphyly of protobranchiate bivalves, and monophyly of Autolamellibranchiata, Pteriomorphia, Heteroconchia, Palaeoheterodonta, and Heterodonta s.l., which includes the monophyletic taxon Anomalodesmata. These analyses strongly support the conclusion that Anomalodesmata should not receive a class status, and that the heterodont orders Myoida and Veneroida are not monophyletic. Among the most stable results of the analysis are the monophyly of Palaeoheterodonta, grouping the extant trigoniids with the freshwater unionids, and the sister-group relationship of the heterodont families Astartidae and Carditidae, which together constitute the sister taxon to the remaining heterodont bivalves. Internal relationships of the main bivalve groups are discussed on the basis of node support and clade stability. [source]


Scaling the Socioeconomic Ladder: Low-Income Women's Perceptions of Class Status and Opportunity

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, Issue 4 2003
Heather E. Bullock
This study examined how 69 low-income women enrolled in an educational training program perceived social class and upward mobility. Participants identified their social class during childhood, their current status, and their anticipated post graduate status. Beliefs about income inequality and attributions for wealth and poverty were also assessed. Respondents expected to achieve middle class status and perceived higher education as a route to upward mobility, although the accessibility of post-secondary programs was questioned. Consistent with previous research involving low-income groups (Bullock, 1999; Kluegel & Smith, 1986), structural attributions for poverty and wealth were favored over individualistic causes. Also, respondents perceived income inequality as unjust. The construction of class identity and implications for class-based mobilization are discussed. It [the American dream] means the opportunity to go as far in life as your abilities will take you. Anyone in America can aspire to be a doctor, a teacher, a police officer or even, as Oprah said, a President. But you can't get any of those important jobs if you don't have the opportunity to acquire the skills you need , . And that's why I believe that the key to the American Dream is education. ,,,,,Former President George Herbert Walker Bush, 1997 [source]