Child Behavior Problems (child + behavior_problem)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Child Behavior Problems and Maternal Symptoms of Depression: A Mediational Model

JOURNAL OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, Issue 4 2004
Maria A. Gartstein PhD
PROBLEM. The relationship between maternal depression and child behavior problems has been consistently demonstrated, but not the impact of child behavior problems on maternal depression. METHODS. Mothers of 3- to 6-year-old children (N = 69) reported regarding their depression, parenting competence, attachment to the child, the child's impact on the family, and behavior problems. FINDINGS. Child behavior problems were positively associated with maternal depression, an association explained by mediating variables: impact of the child on the family, mother's parenting competence, and attachment to the child. CONCLUSIONS. Maternal depression should be considered when providing clinical services to children, given the potential for exacerbation of symptoms in the face of child behavior problems. [source]


Mothers' Violence Victimization and Child Behavior Problems: Examining the Link

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 2 2007
Richard Thompson PhD
The current study examined the link between parents' experience of violence victimization and child outcomes, in 197 mother-child dyads recruited from low-income urban neighborhoods. At recruitment (when children were between 6 and 18 months old), demographic factors, child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, mothers' psychosocial functioning, and mothers' history of violence victimization were assessed. Child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, and mothers' psychosocial functioning were assessed again at age 4. Mothers' history of victimization as children (but not as adults) uniquely predicted child behavior problems at age 4. Three classes of possible mediators were examined: demographics, maternal psychosocial functioning, and mother-child interactions. Of these, only mother psychological aggression toward child met preliminary criteria for mediation; it partially mediated the link between mother childhood victimization and child behavioral outcomes. Maternal depressive symptoms and young age at child's birth independently predicted child behavior problems, but did not act as mediators. Mothers' early experiences with violence victimization appear to exert an important influence on child behavioral outcomes; this influence appears to be mediated, in part, by mothers' psychological aggression toward their children. [source]


Child Behavior Problems and Maternal Symptoms of Depression: A Mediational Model

JOURNAL OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, Issue 4 2004
Maria A. Gartstein PhD
PROBLEM. The relationship between maternal depression and child behavior problems has been consistently demonstrated, but not the impact of child behavior problems on maternal depression. METHODS. Mothers of 3- to 6-year-old children (N = 69) reported regarding their depression, parenting competence, attachment to the child, the child's impact on the family, and behavior problems. FINDINGS. Child behavior problems were positively associated with maternal depression, an association explained by mediating variables: impact of the child on the family, mother's parenting competence, and attachment to the child. CONCLUSIONS. Maternal depression should be considered when providing clinical services to children, given the potential for exacerbation of symptoms in the face of child behavior problems. [source]


Differential Effects of Maternal Sensitivity to Infant Distress and Nondistress on Social-Emotional Functioning

CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 3 2009
Esther M. Leerkes
Associations between maternal sensitivity to infant distress and nondistress and infant social-emotional adjustment were examined in a subset of dyads from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care (N = 376). Mothers reported on infant temperament at 1 and 6 months postpartum, and maternal sensitivity to distress and nondistress were observed at 6 months. Child behavior problems, social competence, and affect dysregulation were measured at 24 and 36 months. Maternal sensitivity to distress but not to nondistress was related to fewer behavioral problems and higher social competence. In addition, for temperamentally reactive infants, maternal sensitivity to distress was associated with less affect dysregulation. Sensitivity to nondistress only prevented affect dysregulation if sensitivity to distress was also high. [source]


Child Behavior Problems and Maternal Symptoms of Depression: A Mediational Model

JOURNAL OF CHILD AND ADOLESCENT PSYCHIATRIC NURSING, Issue 4 2004
Maria A. Gartstein PhD
PROBLEM. The relationship between maternal depression and child behavior problems has been consistently demonstrated, but not the impact of child behavior problems on maternal depression. METHODS. Mothers of 3- to 6-year-old children (N = 69) reported regarding their depression, parenting competence, attachment to the child, the child's impact on the family, and behavior problems. FINDINGS. Child behavior problems were positively associated with maternal depression, an association explained by mediating variables: impact of the child on the family, mother's parenting competence, and attachment to the child. CONCLUSIONS. Maternal depression should be considered when providing clinical services to children, given the potential for exacerbation of symptoms in the face of child behavior problems. [source]


Cultural factors in help-seeking for child behavior problems: Value orientation, affective responding, and severity appraisals among Chinese-American parents

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 6 2001
Anna Lau
This study explored the relationships between cultural values, appraisal of child behavior problems, and associated help-seeking intentions among Chinese-American parents. Questionnaires were administered to 120 Chinese-American parents of elementary-school-aged children. Parents were asked how they might respond if their child displayed the behavioral problems depicted in a hypothetical vignette. Influences of Chinese value orientation, severity appraisal, and affective reactions on help-seeking intentions were examined using regression analyses and structural equation modeling. The study examined three hypotheses regarding the nature of the influence of cultural value orientation on help-seeking intentions: (a) a direct effect model, (b) an indirect effect through cultural differences in severity appraisal, and (c) an indirect effect through cultural differences in affective responding. Results supported the hypothesis that cultural value orientation exerted an indirect effect on help-seeking intentions through its influence on affective responding. Those parents who had more traditional Chinese values responded with more feelings of shame to child behavior problems and, in turn, reported lower intentions to seek help. Findings are discussed with reference to the literature on help-seeking among Asian Americans. 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. [source]


Impact of neighborhood disadvantage on overt behavior problems during early childhood

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 3 2007
Emily B. Winslow
Abstract Researchers have yet to examine the impact of neighborhood disadvantage on early child behavior problems (BPs) longitudinally. We examined the impact of neighborhood disadvantage on overt BPs in a low-income, urban sample of 281 African American and European American boys followed longitudinally from toddlerhood to school entry. Measures included census data and maternal report of BPs, sociocultural factors, parental criminality, and maternal depressive symptomatology. After controlling for age 2 overt BPs, family selection variables, and residential instability, neighborhood effects on boys' behavior emerged, but only at age 6 and only at the extreme of neighborhood disadvantage (i.e., underclass). Findings suggest boys in underclass neighborhoods are at risk for overt BPs as they make the transition to elementary school. Aggr. Behav. 33:1,13, 2007. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Relationships Among Risk, Sense of Coherence, and Well-Being in Parents of Children With and Without Intellectual Disabilities

JOURNAL OF POLICY AND PRACTICE IN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES, Issue 4 2008
Malin B. Olsson
ABSTRACT The authors studied the nature and function of the relationships of the comparative level of risk, sense of coherence (SOC), and well-being, over time, in mothers and fathers of preschool children with and without intellectual disabilities (IDs). The hypothesis that SOC functions as a moderator between risk and well-being was tested. Parents of children with IDs (mothers: n = 62 (46 at follow-up) and fathers: n = 49 (37 at follow-up)) and control parents (mothers: n = 178 (131 at follow-up) and fathers: n = 141 (97 at follow-up)) answered self-report measures on risk factors (i.e., child behavior problems, negative impact on the family and socioeconomic situation) and sense of coherence. Well-being and quality of life were used as outcomes, and were measured at baseline and at a one-year follow-up. The hypothesis of moderation was tested conducting multiple linear regression analyses. The level of well-being was moderately stable over the two time points, with parents of children with ID having lower level of well-being than control parents both initially and after one year. Well-being was also related to level of SOC and cumulative risk with parents experiencing lower SOC or more risk also reporting lower well-being. The hypothesis of SOC acting as a moderator in the relation between cumulative risk and well-being found some support in the longitudinal analyses, but only for well-being (BDI-2r) among control mothers. [source]


Harnessing the power of sibling relationships as a tool for optimizing social,emotional development

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR CHILD & ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT, Issue 126 2009
Elizabeth A. Stormshak
Sibling relationships provide one of the most stable and powerful developmental contexts for the transmission of both prosocial and antisocial behavior. As a source of support and skill development, sibling relationships can build competence in self-regulation and emotional understanding. However, sibling relationships marked by antisocial behavior, substance use, and conflict place children at risk for a host of negative outcomes. Family relationship features, particularly parenting practices and discord, contribute strongly to both the quality of sibling relationships and children's well-being. Our review of intervention strategies reveals that the potential of sibling relationships to promote socioemotional development may be best realized through family-centered approaches that build prosocial sibling interactions, curtail child behavior problems, and strengthen parenting. [source]


Mothers' Violence Victimization and Child Behavior Problems: Examining the Link

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 2 2007
Richard Thompson PhD
The current study examined the link between parents' experience of violence victimization and child outcomes, in 197 mother-child dyads recruited from low-income urban neighborhoods. At recruitment (when children were between 6 and 18 months old), demographic factors, child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, mothers' psychosocial functioning, and mothers' history of violence victimization were assessed. Child behavioral outcomes, mother-child interactions, and mothers' psychosocial functioning were assessed again at age 4. Mothers' history of victimization as children (but not as adults) uniquely predicted child behavior problems at age 4. Three classes of possible mediators were examined: demographics, maternal psychosocial functioning, and mother-child interactions. Of these, only mother psychological aggression toward child met preliminary criteria for mediation; it partially mediated the link between mother childhood victimization and child behavioral outcomes. Maternal depressive symptoms and young age at child's birth independently predicted child behavior problems, but did not act as mediators. Mothers' early experiences with violence victimization appear to exert an important influence on child behavioral outcomes; this influence appears to be mediated, in part, by mothers' psychological aggression toward their children. [source]


Development and psychometric evaluation of an Arab version of the family peer relationship questionnaire,

RESEARCH IN NURSING & HEALTH, Issue 5 2008
Karen J. Aroian
Abstract Little is known about parent and peer relationships in immigrant adolescents due to a dearth of culturally sensitive measures. We adapted the Family Peer Relationship Questionnaire (FPRQ) for Arab immigrant mothers and their adolescents. Mothers and adolescents completed parallel versions of the Arab FPRQ and measures of child behavior problems, child social relations, and maternal depression. Data analyses included confirmatory factor analysis and concurrent validity. The proposed four-factor structure was replicated in both the mother and child forms. Scores from the Arab FPRQ subscales and the other measures provided evidence of concurrent and discriminant validity, suggesting that the Arab FPRQ is a viable assessment tool. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 31:402,416, 2008 [source]


Antecedents and Behavior-Problem Outcomes of Parental Monitoring and Psychological Control in Early Adolescence

CHILD DEVELOPMENT, Issue 2 2001
Gregory S. Pettit
The early childhood antecedents and behavior-problem correlates of monitoring and psychological control were examined in this prospective, longitudinal, multi-informant study. Parenting data were collected during home visit interviews with 440 mothers and their 13-year-old children. Behavior problems (anxiety/depression and delinquent behavior) were assessed via mother, teacher, and/or adolescent reports at ages 8 through 10 years and again at ages 13 through 14. Home-interview data collected at age 5 years were used to measure antecedent parenting (harsh/reactive, positive/proactive), family background (e.g., socioeconomic status), and mother-rated child behavior problems. Consistent with expectation, monitoring was anteceded by a proactive parenting style and by advantageous family,ecological characteristics, and psychological control was anteceded by harsh parenting and by mothers' earlier reports of child externalizing problems. Consistent with prior research, monitoring was associated with fewer delinquent behavior problems. Links between psychological control and adjustment were more complex: High levels of psychological control were associated with more delinquent problems for girls and for teens who were low in preadolescent delinquent problems, and with more anxiety/depression for girls and for teens who were high in preadolescent anxiety/depression. [source]


Negative emotionality, attachment quality, and behavior problems in early childhood

INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Issue 1 2007
Ursula Pauli-Pott
Negative emotionality, as well as attachment security and disorganization, are seen as major contributors to social adjustment and maladjustment in childhood. However, relatively little is known about whether infant negative emotionality and attachment quality operate together to affect developing behavior problems. The present study thus aims to contribute to this question. Participants were 64 healthy firstborn children and their primary caregivers. Negative emotionality was assessed at the infant ages of 4, 8, and 12 months using laboratory routines. At 18 months, the Strange Situation procedure was conducted to assess infant attachment security and disorganization, and at 30 months, the child's behavior problems were assessed within a structured clinical interview. Attachment security and attachment disorganization were significantly associated with subsequent behavior problems. There was no significant relation between infant negative emotionality and behavior problems. However, there were indications of a stronger association between attachment disorganization and behavior problems in infants high in negative emotionality. The results underpin the importance of attachment quality as well as negative emotionality in social adjustment. Disorganized attachment precedes poor adjustment, especially in infants high in negative emotionality. [source]