Chemistry Course (chemistry + course)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Labeling of proteins with fluorescent probes: Photophysical characterization of dansylated bovine serum albumin,

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY EDUCATION, Issue 5 2003
Valeria Levi
Abstract Fluorescence spectroscopy is a widely used technique in biophysical studies. One of the strategies frequently used consists of labeling biomolecules with fluorescent probes, which have distinctive photophysical properties. This methodology allows the study of a wide variety of structural features of the biomolecule. We describe a simple laboratory activity for undergraduate Biophysical Chemistry courses. The experimental work includes two activities: labeling BSA with dansyl chloride and analyzing the resulting absorption and fluorescence spectra. The discussion of these activities helps students to understand the basis of fluorescence spectroscopy with emphasis in the application to biological systems. [source]


Teaching crystallography to undergraduate physical chemistry students

JOURNAL OF APPLIED CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, Issue 5-2 2010
Virginia B. Pett
Teaching goals, laboratory experiments and homework assignments are described for teaching crystallography as part of two undergraduate physical chemistry courses. A two-week teaching module is suggested for introductory physical chemistry, including six to eight classroom sessions, several laboratory experiences and a 3,h computer-based session, to acquaint undergraduate physical chemistry students with crystals, diffraction patterns, the mathematics of structure determination by X-ray diffraction, data collection, structure solution and the chemical insights available from crystal structure information. Student projects and laboratory work for three to four weeks of an advanced physical chemistry course are presented. Topics such as symmetry operators, space groups, systematic extinctions, methods of solving the phase problem, the Patterson map, anomalous scattering, synchrotron radiation, crystallographic refinement, hydrogen bonding and neutron diffraction all lead to the goal of understanding and evaluating a crystallographic journal article. Many of the ideas presented here could also be adapted for inorganic chemistry courses. [source]


Implementation of a peer-led team learning instructional approach in an undergraduate organic chemistry course

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 7 2002
Lydia T. Tien
This study focuses on the implementation of a peer-led team learning (PLTL) instructional approach for all students in an undergraduate organic chemistry course and the evaluation of student outcomes over 8 years. Students who experienced the student-centered instruction and worked in small groups facilitated by a peer leader (treatment) in 1996,1999 were compared with students who experienced the traditional recitation section (control) in 1992,1994. Quantitative and qualitative data show statistically significant improvements in student performance, retention, and attitudes about the course. These findings suggest that using undergraduate leaders to implement a peer-led team learning model that is built on a social constructivist foundation is a workable mechanism for effecting change in undergraduate science courses. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 39: 606,632, 2002 [source]


Teaching crystallography to undergraduate physical chemistry students

JOURNAL OF APPLIED CRYSTALLOGRAPHY, Issue 5-2 2010
Virginia B. Pett
Teaching goals, laboratory experiments and homework assignments are described for teaching crystallography as part of two undergraduate physical chemistry courses. A two-week teaching module is suggested for introductory physical chemistry, including six to eight classroom sessions, several laboratory experiences and a 3,h computer-based session, to acquaint undergraduate physical chemistry students with crystals, diffraction patterns, the mathematics of structure determination by X-ray diffraction, data collection, structure solution and the chemical insights available from crystal structure information. Student projects and laboratory work for three to four weeks of an advanced physical chemistry course are presented. Topics such as symmetry operators, space groups, systematic extinctions, methods of solving the phase problem, the Patterson map, anomalous scattering, synchrotron radiation, crystallographic refinement, hydrogen bonding and neutron diffraction all lead to the goal of understanding and evaluating a crystallographic journal article. Many of the ideas presented here could also be adapted for inorganic chemistry courses. [source]


Transfer of algebraic and graphical thinking between mathematics and chemistry

JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN SCIENCE TEACHING, Issue 2 2008
Marietjie Potgieter
Students in undergraduate chemistry courses find, as a rule, topics with a strong mathematical basis difficult to master. In this study we investigate whether such mathematically related problems are due to deficiencies in their mathematics foundation or due to the complexity introduced by transfer of mathematics to a new scientific domain. In the investigation we exposed a group of students to a chemistry instrument based on the Nernst equation in electrochemistry, and an equivalent group of students to a similar mathematics instrument in which the questions were stripped of all chemistry context. Both tests contained items requiring algebraic as well as graphical skills. Students experienced few problems with the algebraic questions in both the chemistry and mathematics tests. Their graphical construction and interpretation skills, on the other hand, are inadequate, as can be seen from the poor performance in both the mathematics and the chemistry results of the graphical question. Our conclusion is that the problem seems to lie at the mathematics side and is not due to the transfer of mathematics to an application. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 45: 197,218, 2008. [source]