Acylcarnitine Profile (acylcarnitine + profile)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Lack of correlation between fatty acid oxidation disorders and haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome?

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 1 2005
M. Holub
Abstract Aim: Fatty acid ,-oxidation defects comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders that may precipitate acute life threatening metabolic crises particularly during catabolic episodes. Several studies have demonstrated a possible association between fatty acid ,-oxidation defects, including long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and severe pregnancy complications. However, the precise percentage of women with haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome associated with foetal fatty acid ,-oxidation defects is not known. Methods: We carried out a multicentre retrospective study on 88 infants, born to women with HELLP syndrome. Acylcarnitine profiles from blood dried on filter paper cards were analysed by tandem mass spectrometry for the diagnosis of fatty acid ,-oxidation defects. In addition, we screened for the common long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency mutation using a standard restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction method. Results: None of the infants studied carried the common long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency mutation. There was no evidence of fatty acid ,-oxidation defects, including long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, as expected by unremarkable acylcarnitine profiles, while three infants with fatty acid ,-oxidation defects were diagnosed in the control group. Conclusions: Neither foetal long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, including heterozygosity for the common long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency mutation, nor fatty acid ,-oxidation defects in general are a major risk factor for HELLP syndrome in Austria. [source]


Atypical presentation of VLCAD deficiency associated with a novel ACADVL splicing mutation

MUSCLE AND NERVE, Issue 3 2009
Oleg Shchelochkov MD
Abstract Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism characterized by impaired mitochondrial ,-oxidation of fatty acids with a chain length between 14 and 18 carbons. While expansion of newborn screening has improved our ability to detect VLCAD deficiency in early childhood, the late-onset form of the disease still presents a significant diagnostic challenge. We report a 20-year-old female with VLCAD deficiency who first presented in infancy with hypoketotic hypoglycemia. In childhood the patient developed complex partial seizures that were aggravated by Lamotrigine treatment. The clinical course in early adulthood was complicated by recurrent, often unprovoked, episodes of rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria. In addition, she suffered from chronic myalgia, muscle weakness, and diffuse abdominal tenderness. A muscle biopsy revealed accumulation of fat droplets. Her acylcarnitine profile showed significantly elevated C14, C14:1, C16, and C18-carnitines. Sequence analysis of ACADVL revealed a heterozygous recurrent mutation c.848T>C (p.V283A) and a heterozygous novel splice mutation c.879-8T>A that results in the inclusion of six nucleotides from intron 9 into the transcript sequence. The molecular characterization of this novel mutation and its correlation with the clinical phenotype are discussed. Muscle Nerve 39: 374,382, 2009 [source]


Biochemical findings in common inborn errors of metabolism,

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF MEDICAL GENETICS, Issue 2 2006
Marzia Pasquali
Abstract The application of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to newborn screening has led to the detection of patients with a wider spectrum of inborn errors of metabolism. A definitive diagnosis can often be established early enough to start treatment before symptoms appear. Here, we review common biochemical findings in disorders caused by deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase, isobutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, 2-methyl-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, 3-ketothiolase, 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase, and medium chain acyl CoA dehydrogenase. The diagnosis of these disorders requires biochemical confirmation by measurement of plasma acylcarnitine profile, urine organic acids, and urine acylglycine profiles followed by measurement of enzyme activity or detection of causative mutations. Early treatment can improve the outcome of these disorders. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Lack of correlation between fatty acid oxidation disorders and haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome?

ACTA PAEDIATRICA, Issue 1 2005
M. Holub
Abstract Aim: Fatty acid ,-oxidation defects comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders that may precipitate acute life threatening metabolic crises particularly during catabolic episodes. Several studies have demonstrated a possible association between fatty acid ,-oxidation defects, including long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency and severe pregnancy complications. However, the precise percentage of women with haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets (HELLP) syndrome associated with foetal fatty acid ,-oxidation defects is not known. Methods: We carried out a multicentre retrospective study on 88 infants, born to women with HELLP syndrome. Acylcarnitine profiles from blood dried on filter paper cards were analysed by tandem mass spectrometry for the diagnosis of fatty acid ,-oxidation defects. In addition, we screened for the common long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency mutation using a standard restriction fragment length polymorphism polymerase chain reaction method. Results: None of the infants studied carried the common long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency mutation. There was no evidence of fatty acid ,-oxidation defects, including long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, as expected by unremarkable acylcarnitine profiles, while three infants with fatty acid ,-oxidation defects were diagnosed in the control group. Conclusions: Neither foetal long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, including heterozygosity for the common long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency mutation, nor fatty acid ,-oxidation defects in general are a major risk factor for HELLP syndrome in Austria. [source]