Achievement Award (achievement + award)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Remarks on Receiving the 2003 ASTDD Outstanding Achievement Award

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2003
Article first published online: 6 AUG 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


2003 ASTDD Outstanding Achievement Award: Diane Brunson, RDH, MPH

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH DENTISTRY, Issue 2003
M. Dean Perkins DDS
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


MYSTERIES OF ADAPTATION TO HYPOXIA AND PRESSURE IN MARINE MAMMALS The Kenneth S. Norris Lifetime Achievement Award Lecture

MARINE MAMMAL SCIENCE, Issue 3 2006
Gerald L. Kooyman
Presented on 12 December 2005 San Diego, California Abstract This paper reviews past and current work on diving behavior, effects of pressure, and the aerobic diving limit from the perspective of the Ken Norris Lifetime Achievement Award. Because of the influence of Norris to marine mammalogy in general, and to my career in particular, I want to emphasize the important tradition of mentors and colleagues as keystones to a successful career in science, and ultimately to the success of science itself. These two related activities are illustrated by studies on marine mammals that were conducted in an endeavor to understand: (1) the behavioral traits associated with deep diving, (2) the mechanical and physiological effects of pressure during routine dives to great depth, and (3) the degree of oxygen depletion that they routinely endure while diving. The search for answers has resulted in numerous physiological and ecological experiments, along with accompanying theoretical analyses. Currently it appears that some deep-diving mammals may suffer from bends, and some may resort more often than what seems physiologically possible to anaerobic metabolism while diving. Above all, the way divers manage their nitrogen and oxygen stores remains a mystery. [source]


A brief history of the Human Biology Association: 1974,2004

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN BIOLOGY, Issue 2 2005
Michael A. Little
Originally incorporated as the Human Biology Council in 1974, the Human Biology Association, as it has been known since 1994, has matured in the intervening 30 years to become a society that represents broadly the interests of human biologists in the U.S. and throughout the world. The purpose of this paper is to trace the development of the Association from its foundation to the present in the context of changes in the organization of the Association and in its By-Laws, officers, committees, and membership; the history of the two journals that served as the Association's official organs (Human Biology and American Journal of Human Biology); and how the annual meetings have evolved from a modest one-day plenary session to meetings that last more than two days and include a variety of scientific contributions. Highlights of the national meetings include the Raymond Pearl Memorial Lecture, the Franz Boas Distinguished Achievement Award, and the Edward E. Hunt, Jr. Student Prize. Am. J. Hum. Biol. 17:141,154, 2005. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Dr Christopher Blagg to Receive Lifetime Achievement Award

ARTIFICIAL ORGANS, Issue 5 2010
Andrew Davenport MD
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Celebrating Student Achievement: Award-Winning Papers 2001,05

ANNALS OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL PRACTICE, Issue 1 2007
Alayne Unterberger
This article presents an overview of the history, background, and content of the 13 winning papers from the NAPA Student Achievement Awards from 2001,05. The award, begun in 2001, has expanded from one to three prizes that include monetary remuneration, an award at the AAA meetings, and publication. NAPA began the award to support and encourage students to undertake applied and practicing anthropology projects. We discuss the evolution of the award, how NAPA members are involved, and present conclusions about the paper topics and .ndings. Papers can be thought of as illustrative of solid examples of practicing and applied work, regardless of the fact that they were written when the authors were students. [source]