Case Illustration (case + illustration)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Infant's triangular communication in "two for one" versus "two against one" family triangles: Case illustrations,

INFANT MENTAL HEALTH JOURNAL, Issue 3 2008
Elisabeth Fivaz-Depeursinge
Infants use their social competence very early to communicate not only in dyads but also in triads, in particular in the triangle they form with their mother and father. The development of this triangular communication is largely shaped by the ways the parents support or undermine each other in relation to their child. Whereas triangular communication is facilitated in "two for one" alliances, it is recruited in the service of regulating the parents' conflicts in "two against one" coalitions. These processes are manifest in toddlerhood and may be traced back to the coparenting alliance in formation during pregnancy. [source]


Multiple Realities: A Relational Narrative Approach in Therapy With Black,White Mixed-Race Clients

FAMILY RELATIONS, Issue 2 2003
Kerry Ann Rockquemore
Notions of a racial identity for persons with one Black and one White parent have assumed the existence of only a singular identity (first Black and later biracial). Emerging empirical research on racial identity formation among members of this group reveals that multiple identity options are possible. In terms of overall health, the level of social invalidation one encounters with respect to racial self-identification is more important than the specific racial identity selected. Here a relational narrative approach to therapy with Black,White mixed-race clients who experience systematic invalidation of their chosen racial identity is presented through a detailed case illustration. [source]


Therapist empathy and client anxiety reduction in motivational interviewing: "She carries with me, the experience"

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 11 2009
Lynne E. Angus
Abstract In this article, we examine the use of motivational interviewing (MI) to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by means of case illustration that focuses on four categories drawn from the client's experience of the key ingredients in MI therapy. The case illustration, drawn from the York study on combining MI and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of GAD (uses the client's pre- and post-therapy narrative interviews) to arrive at categories representative of the client's experience of MI therapy. The results of the qualitative analysis highlight the key contributions to positive client outcomes and readiness for change in brief MI therapy for GAD. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 65: 1,12, 2009. [source]


Cognitive behavioral therapy of negative symptoms

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2009
Dimitri Perivoliotis
Abstract Negative symptoms account for much of the functional disability associated with schizophrenia and often persist despite pharmacological treatment. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a promising adjunctive psychotherapy for negative symptoms. The treatment is based on a cognitive formulation in which negative symptoms arise and are maintained by dysfunctional beliefs that are a reaction to the neurocognitive impairment and discouraging life events frequently experienced by individuals with schizophrenia. This article outlines recent innovations in tailoring CBT for negative symptoms and functioning, including the use of a strong goal-oriented recovery approach, in-session exercises designed to disconfirm dysfunctional beliefs, and adaptations to circumvent neurocognitive and engagement difficulties. A case illustration is provided. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 65:1,16, 2009. [source]


An integrative formulation-based cognitive treatment of bipolar disorders: Application and illustration

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2007
Warren Mansell
An integrative cognitive treatment for mood swings and bipolar disorders is summarized and then illustrated in a clinical case. In essence, it is proposed that multiple, extreme, and conflicting beliefs about changes in internal state, and the reciprocal impact of these beliefs on behavior, physiology, and the social environment, constitute the central mechanism that maintain and escalate bipolar symptoms. Using a case illustration with examples of therapy dialogue, several key aspects of cognitive-behavioral therapy are explained, including the assessment of mood, beliefs, distressing imagery, and recurrent thinking; case formulation; therapeutic techniques; self-awareness; interpersonal factors during therapy; and systemic issues. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 63: 447,461, 2007. [source]


Trauma focus group therapy for combat-related PTSD: An update

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2002
David W. Foy
Individual cognitive,behavioral therapy involving directed exposure to memories of traumatic events has been found to be effective in treating posttraumatic stress disorder. In this article, we present updated information on an alternative group form of exposure therapy: manualized trauma-focus group therapy (TFGT), designed as an efficient means of conducting directed exposure. We describe the cognitive,behavioral and developmental models from which the approach was derived, present an overview of session topics and a case illustration, provide guidelines for referring individuals to TFGT, and offer suggestions for future research. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session 58: 907,918, 2002. [source]


Brief psychodynamic treatment of PTSD

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2002
Janice L. Krupnick
This article describes a brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for adults suffering from PTSD following exposure to a single traumatic event, such as tragic bereavement, assault, or loss of a body part through surgery. It uses a supportive therapeutic relationship to uncover what the specific event and circumstances that follow mean to the individual and the obstacles to normal psychological processing of these events. Using this 12-session treatment model, therapists pay particular attention to the individual's current phase of response and the typical ways that the individual avoids threatening information. Making links among the recent trauma, earlier developmental experiences that may have rendered the individual vulnerable to the development of PTSD, and ways that conflicts are reenacted in the therapeutic dyad, dynamic therapists seek to help traumatized individuals re-establish a sense of coherence and meaning in their lives. A case illustration is provided to demonstrate the phases and techniques in this approach. 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session 58: 919,932, 2002 [source]


A case illustration of resistance from a cognitive perspective

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2002
Cory F. Newman
Brian, a 36-year-old, single, white male, entered cognitive therapy in response to a depressive episode precipitated by the loss of a job. In addition to his Major Depression, the client met diagnostic criteria for Dysthymia and Personality Disorder Not Otherwise Specified. The first three sessions focused on Brian's unemployment crisis and related dysphoria, as well as his passive-avoidant approach to life. Brian collaborated with the therapist in formulating a treatment plan and quickly found a new job, whereupon he abruptly withdrew from therapy. Shortly thereafter, Brian contacted the therapist in a renewed state of "crisis" and returned for a fourth session. The therapist attempted to draw a link between Brian's passive-avoidant style and his vulnerability to problems such as those he currently was experiencing. The client had difficulty understanding the therapist's thread of logic, became somewhat defensive and combative, and did not return for further sessions. 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session 58: 145,149, 2002. [source]


A case illustration of resistance from a gestalt-experiential perspective

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2002
David Engle
The case of Victoria illustrates psychotherapy with a woman faced with a difficult and unexpected divorce. The authors present a summary of typical struggles faced by Victoria through three phases of therapy. The therapy focused initially on coping with the divorce, then moved to work on her career dissatisfaction, and finally to her efforts to develop a new relationship. The case presentation illustrates resistance as it manifested itself in both a behavioral manner and as in-session resistance to awareness of internal states. The behavioral mode of resistance is manifested by her inability to follow through on decisions made in therapy sessions and by her interruptions of ongoing therapy. A transcript of a typical in-session exchange illustrates the resistance to awareness. The authors also describe interventions intended to work with the resistance. 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session 58: 151,156, 2002. [source]


Assessment for crisis intervention

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2006
Rick A. Myer
This article describes the triage assessment system (TAS) for crisis intervention. The TAS assesses affective, behavioral, and cognitive reactions of individuals to crisis events. This assessment model offers clinicians an understanding of the type of reactions clients are experiencing as well as the intensity of these reactions. The TAS provides a quick, accurate, and easy-to- use method that is directly usable in the intervention process. The system can also be used to monitor clients' progress during the intervention process. Two case illustrations are presented to demonstrate the use of the model. In addition, the Triage Assessment Form: Crisis Intervention is included as an Appendix. 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 62: 959,970, 2006. [source]


A multimodal behavioral approach to performance anxiety

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 8 2004
Arnold A. Lazarus
Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) stresses a trimodal assessment framework (affect, behavior, and cognition [ABC]), whereas the multimodal approach assesses seven discrete but interactive components,behavior, affect, sensation, imagery, cognition, interpersonal relationships, and drugs/biological factors (BASIC I.D.). Only complex or recalcitrant cases call for the entire seven-pronged range of multimodal interventions. Various case illustrations are offered as examples of how a clinician might proceed when confronted with problems that fall under the general heading of performance anxiety. The main example is of a violinist in a symphony orchestra whose career was in serious jeopardy because of his extreme fear of performing in public. He responded very well to a focused but elaborate desensitization procedure. The hierarchy that was eventually constructed contained many dimensions and subhierarchies featuring interlocking elements that evoked his anxiety. In addition to imaginal systematic desensitization, sessions were devoted to his actual performance in the clinical setting. As a homework assignment, he found it helpful to listen to a long-playing record of an actual rehearsal and to play along with the world-renowned orchestra and conductor. The subsequent disclosure by the client of an important sexual problem was dealt with concomitantly by using a fairly conventional counseling procedure. Therapy required 20 sessions over a 3-month period. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session. [source]


Radiation Burns as a Severe Complication of Fluoroscopically Guided Cardiological Interventions

JOURNAL OF INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue 3 2004
Ch.B., RONALD E. VLIETSTRA M.B.
Radiation-induced skin burns can be produced by high doses of fluoroscopic X rays. Though uncommon, such injuries can cause considerable distress to the patient and they can lead to deep ulcers requiring skin grafts. Factors that increase the chance of a burn can be readily identified and in nearly all instances they can be avoided or minimized. We discuss these issues and use case illustrations to point out how burns can be avoided. (J Interven Cardiol 2004;17:131,142) [source]


Re-Thinking Illegality as a Violence Against, not by Mexican Immigrants, Children, and Youth

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL ISSUES, Issue 1 2003
Jocelyn Solis
Sociohistorical theory was used to examine illegality as a form of state violence that bears upon the formation of undocumented Mexican immigrants. This article proposes a theory of dialectical violence that integrates societal with personal enactments of violence through case illustrations of Mexican youth. In a grassroots association defending immigrants' rights, youth develop within conflicting discourses about undocumented immigrants proposed by society, family, and community. Methods included ethnographic analysis of the association's documents, a workshop in which five participants authored a booklet with texts and illustrations about their lives in the city, and an interview with their mothers. Findings illustrate how Mexican youth enter a cycle of violence as a result of their undocumented status, socioeconomic class, language and ethnic-racial memberships. [source]


PERVERSE FEMALES: THEIR UNIQUE PSYCHOPATHOLOGY

BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHOTHERAPY, Issue 3 2003
Dorothy Lloyd-Owen
ABSTRACT This paper explores the psychopathology of perversion in women, an area often resisted in society and, as a consequence, leaving women without the help they need. The role of aggression and ,core complex' issues are discussed with case illustrations of the perverse use of the body in women. [source]


2241: Principles of genetic counselling

ACTA OPHTHALMOLOGICA, Issue 2010
G HALL
Purpose To present the genetic counselling needs of families with inherited eye disease. Methods A presentation on the counselling challenges and ethical dilemmas in genetic services for inherited eye disease using case illustrations and review of research and current literature. Results Genetic counselling for families with inherited eye disease is rapidly advancing with improvements in molecular testing leading to accurate diagnosis and information for families. With increasing patient demand and expectation, families request genetic counselling to understand the inheritance pattern and the risks to themselves and their children. However, the heterogeneity, variable penetrance and overlapping phenotypes make this particularly challenging in genetic eye disease. Genetic counselling is a communication process to provide information about the genetic condition, its inheritance and to facilitate decision-making around genetic testing and reproduction. Genetic counsellors have experience in helping individuals decide and come to terms with results from genetic testing such as pre-symptomatic testing, childhood testing and pre-natal diagnosis. In addition, families are often coping with the psychological burden of progressive blindness and the impact of vision loss and risk to other family members. Recent publications highlight the disparity in specialist service provision for families with inherited eye disease and calls for research and improvements in evidenced-based practice. Conclusion Families with inherited eye disease have complex genetic counselling needs requiring multidisciplinary co-ordination of services for accurate diagnosis, information provision, genetic testing and decision-making, and support and follow-up. [source]