Case Formulation (case + formulation)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Are obsessive-compulsive personality traits associated with a poor outcome in anorexia nervosa?

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EATING DISORDERS, Issue 7 2007
A systematic review of randomized controlled trials, naturalistic outcome studies
Abstract Objective: Obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) traits are commonly associated with anorexia nervosa (AN). The aim of this review was to systematically search the literature to examine whether OCPD traits have an impact on the outcome of AN. Method: A systematic electronic search of the literature (using Medline, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) was undertaken to identify relevant publications (randomized controlled trials (RCT's) and naturalistic studies), until February 2006. Results: Eleven prospective longitudinal studies and 12 RCT's met criteria for inclusion. A meta-analysis was not feasible as the studies were too heterogeneous. Just over half of published longitudinal studies found that OCPD traits were associated with a negative outcome in AN. Additionally, results from three RCTs suggested that these traits may moderate outcome. OCPD traits were reduced after treatment in five RCTs. Conclusion: There is tentative support to suggest that individuals with AN and concomitant OCPD traits have a poorer prognosis, and that these traits moderate outcome. A reduction in these traits may mediate this change. An individualized case formulation with treatment tailored to OCPD traits may improve the outcome of AN. 2007 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


An integrative formulation-based cognitive treatment of bipolar disorders: Application and illustration

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 5 2007
Warren Mansell
An integrative cognitive treatment for mood swings and bipolar disorders is summarized and then illustrated in a clinical case. In essence, it is proposed that multiple, extreme, and conflicting beliefs about changes in internal state, and the reciprocal impact of these beliefs on behavior, physiology, and the social environment, constitute the central mechanism that maintain and escalate bipolar symptoms. Using a case illustration with examples of therapy dialogue, several key aspects of cognitive-behavioral therapy are explained, including the assessment of mood, beliefs, distressing imagery, and recurrent thinking; case formulation; therapeutic techniques; self-awareness; interpersonal factors during therapy; and systemic issues. 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol: In Session 63: 447,461, 2007. [source]


Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for tinnitus

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 2 2004
Gerhard Andersson
Tinnitus is a common otological problem that is often resistant to surgical or medical interventions. In common with chronic pain, cognitive-behavioral treatment has been found to alleviate the distress and improve the functioning of tinnitus patients. Recently, a self-help treatment has been developed for use via the Internet. In this article, we describe the self-help program and apply it to a middle-aged woman with tinnitus. We report the case formulation, which was done in a structured interview, and the treatment interactions, which were conducted via e-mail. The self-help program was presented on Web pages, and weekly diaries were submitted to follow progress and give feedback. The treatment was successful with reductions of tinnitus-related annoyance and anxious and depressive mood. Implications for Internet administration of self-help treatment are discussed. 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol/In Session. [source]


The States Description Procedure: the use of guided self-reflection in the case formulation of patients with Borderline Personality Disorder

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY (AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THEORY & PRACTICE), Issue 1 2005
Dawn Bennett
Patients with Borderline Personality Disorder are prone to switch between contrasting states in ways that are confusing to themselves and others. The Multiple Self States Model provides an explanation of this. Based on this model, a method of guided patient self-reflection is described, which can contribute to the recognition and characterization of the individual patient's array of contrasting states and provide a guide to treatment and management. A case example is provided, illustrating the understandings derived from the procedure.,Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Is Cognitive Case Formulation Science or Science Fiction?

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: SCIENCE AND PRACTICE, Issue 1 2003
Peter J. Bieling
As with all systematic models of therapy, cognitive therapy distills a theory to the understanding of particular cases through the case formulation method. This article sets out criteria to evaluate whether cognitive case formulation follows the process of scientific inquiry, and it questions whether the formulation method meets these criteria. In terms of the evidence base for the cognitive theory that underpins cognitive case formulation, the research suggests that although the descriptive elements of cognitive theory are substantiated, the explanatory elements have received less support. In terms of the scientific status of the cognitive case formulation process, current evidence for the reliability of the cognitive case formulation method is modest, at best. There is a striking paucity of research examining the validity of cognitive case formulations or the impact of cognitive case formulation on therapy outcome. Implications for the clinical use of cognitive case formulation within a scientist-practitioner model are discussed, and potential programs of research to evaluate the case formulation method are described. [source]