Carrot Chips (carrot + chip)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Carotenoid Content and Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics of Carrot Chips Deep-Fried in Different Oils at Several Temperatures

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 9 2001
A. Sulaeman
ABSTRACT: The influence of deep-frying using different oils and temperatures on carotenoid content and physicochemical and sensory characteristics of carrot chips was investigated. Sliced carrots were steam-blanched, cooled, soaked in 0.2% sodium metabisulfite, and deep-fried in canola, palm, or partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSO) at 165, 175, or 185 C. Frying temperature, but not oil, significantly (P < 0.05) affected the ,-carotene, ,-carotene, and total carotenoid contents. Oil type significantly (P < 0.05) influenced all color values. Increasing temperature lowered the redness value, which correlated with decreased carotenoid content, color darkening, and decreased hardness value. Trained panelists detected no differences among oil types in crispness, sweetness, odor, and acceptability. The best carrot-chip product was that fried in PHSO at 165 C. [source]


Changes in carotenoid, physicochemical and sensory values of deep-fried carrot chips during storage

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Issue 5 2003
Ahmad Sulaeman
Summary Deep-fried carrot chips were packaged in layered film (metallized polyester and linear low-density polyethylene) pouches under a partial vacuum of <1% O2 concentration. Packages containing chips were stored in dark chambers at three conditions: 0,1 C, 94,98% relative humidity (r.h.) (A); 22,23 C, 31,45% r.h. (B); and 29,31 C, 89,93% r.h. (C) for 0,5 months. Retention of , - and , -carotene content and vitamin A activity were >82% over 5 months for all conditions. Colour values (L, a, b) were unchanged over 5 months for A and B, but decreased gradually (P < 0.05) for C. No changes in moisture content, fat content, water activity, texture values and sensory values were observed over time for A and B, but changed (P < 0.05) for C. No sensory differences were observed by condition or time in colour. Carrot chips, packaged in partially vacuumed opaque pouches, can be stored for at least 5 months at 0,1 C, 94,98% r.h. or 22,23 C, 31,45% r.h. [source]


The optimization of vacuum frying to dehydrate carrot chips

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Issue 9 2005
Liu-ping Fan
Summary The effects of pretreatment and processing conditions, such as frying temperature, absolute vacuum pressure and frying time; on the properties of fried carrot chips were studied. Statistical analysis with response surface regression showed that moisture content, fat content and breaking force of carrot chips were significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with frying temperature, vacuum absolute pressure and frying time. The optimum conditions were a vacuum frying temperature of 100,110 C, a vacuum absolute pressure of 0.010,0.020 MPa and a frying time of 15 min. [source]


Changes in carotenoid, physicochemical and sensory values of deep-fried carrot chips during storage

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY, Issue 5 2003
Ahmad Sulaeman
Summary Deep-fried carrot chips were packaged in layered film (metallized polyester and linear low-density polyethylene) pouches under a partial vacuum of <1% O2 concentration. Packages containing chips were stored in dark chambers at three conditions: 0,1 C, 94,98% relative humidity (r.h.) (A); 22,23 C, 31,45% r.h. (B); and 29,31 C, 89,93% r.h. (C) for 0,5 months. Retention of , - and , -carotene content and vitamin A activity were >82% over 5 months for all conditions. Colour values (L, a, b) were unchanged over 5 months for A and B, but decreased gradually (P < 0.05) for C. No changes in moisture content, fat content, water activity, texture values and sensory values were observed over time for A and B, but changed (P < 0.05) for C. No sensory differences were observed by condition or time in colour. Carrot chips, packaged in partially vacuumed opaque pouches, can be stored for at least 5 months at 0,1 C, 94,98% r.h. or 22,23 C, 31,45% r.h. [source]


Carotenoid Content and Physicochemical and Sensory Characteristics of Carrot Chips Deep-Fried in Different Oils at Several Temperatures

JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE, Issue 9 2001
A. Sulaeman
ABSTRACT: The influence of deep-frying using different oils and temperatures on carotenoid content and physicochemical and sensory characteristics of carrot chips was investigated. Sliced carrots were steam-blanched, cooled, soaked in 0.2% sodium metabisulfite, and deep-fried in canola, palm, or partially hydrogenated soybean oil (PHSO) at 165, 175, or 185 C. Frying temperature, but not oil, significantly (P < 0.05) affected the ,-carotene, ,-carotene, and total carotenoid contents. Oil type significantly (P < 0.05) influenced all color values. Increasing temperature lowered the redness value, which correlated with decreased carotenoid content, color darkening, and decreased hardness value. Trained panelists detected no differences among oil types in crispness, sweetness, odor, and acceptability. The best carrot-chip product was that fried in PHSO at 165 C. [source]