CARE SOCIETY (care + society)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of CARE SOCIETY

  • critical care society


  • Selected Abstracts


    VETERINARY EMERGENCY & CRITICAL CARE SOCIETY 2010 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

    JOURNAL OF VETERINARY EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE, Issue 3 2010
    Article first published online: 8 JUN 2010
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    VETERINARY EMERGENCY & CRITICAL CARE SOCIETY 2008 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

    JOURNAL OF VETERINARY EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE, Issue 5 2008
    Article first published online: 21 OCT 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    VETERINARY EMERGENCY & CRITICAL CARE SOCIETY 2008 MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

    JOURNAL OF VETERINARY EMERGENCY AND CRITICAL CARE, Issue 2 2008
    Article first published online: 29 MAR 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Hospitalists and intensivists: Partners in caring for the critically ill,The time has come,

    JOURNAL OF HOSPITAL MEDICINE, Issue 1 2010
    Michael Heisler MD
    Abstract A report by the Committee on Manpower for Pulmonary and Critical Care Societies (COMPACCS), published in 2000, predicted that beginning in 2007 a gap between the demand and availability of intensivists in the United States would become apparent and steadily increase to 22% by 2020 and to 35% by 2030. Subsequent reports have reiterated those projections including a report to congress in 2006 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Health Resources and Services Administration. This "gap" has been called a health system "crisis" by multiple authors. Two important documents have published specific recommendations for how to resolve this crisis: the Framing Options for Critical Care in the United States (FOCCUS) Task Force Report in 2004 and the Prioritizing the Organization and Management of Intensive Care Services in the Unites States (PrOMIS) Conference Report in 2007. Since the initial COMPACCS report and since these 2 additional reports were published, a new opportunity to take a major step in resolving this crisis has emerged: the growing number of hospitalists providing critical care services at secondary and tertiary care facilities. According to the 2005/2006 Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM) National Survey, that number has increased to 75%. Since the number of intensivists is unlikely to change significantly over the next 25 years, the question is no longer "if" hospitalists should be in the intensive care unit (ICU); rather the question is how to assure quality and improved clinical outcomes through enhanced collaboration between hospital medicine and critical care medicine. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2010;5:1,3. 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine. [source]