Care Research (care + research)

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Care Research

  • health care research

  • Terms modified by Care Research

  • care research network

  • Selected Abstracts


    A re-examination of distance as a proxy for severity of illness and the implications for differences in utilization by race/ethnicity ,,

    HEALTH ECONOMICS, Issue 7 2007
    Jayasree Basu
    Abstract The study analyzes the hospitalization patterns of elderly residents to examine whether the relation between distant travel and severity of illness is uniform across racial/ethnic subgroups. A hypothesis is made that severity thresholds could be higher for minorities than whites. Hospital discharge data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP-SID) of the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality for New York residents is used, with a link to the Area Resource File and American Hospital Association's survey files. Logistic models compare the association of distant admission with severity corresponding to each local threshold level, race, and type of hospital admission. The study uses four discrete distance thresholds in contrast to recent work. Also, an examination of severity thresholds for distant travel for different types of admission may clarify different sources of disparities in health care utilization. The findings indicate that minorities are likely to have higher severity thresholds than whites in seeking distant hospital care, although these conclusions depend on the type of condition. The study results imply that if costly elective services were regionalized to get the advantages of high volume for both cost and quality of care, some extra effort at outreach may be desirable to reduce disparities in appropriate care. Published in 2006 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Integrated specialty mental health care among older minorities improves access but not outcomes: results of the PRISMe study

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 10 2008
    Patricia A. Areán
    Abstract Objective In this secondary data analysis of Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for the Elderly (PRIMSe) study, we hypothesized that older minorities who receive mental health services integrated in primary care settings would have greater service use and better mental health outcomes than older minorities referred to community services. Method We identified 2,022 (48% minorities) primary care patients 65 years and older, who met study inclusion criteria and had either alcohol misuse, depression, and/or anxiety. They were randomized to receive treatment for these disorders in the primary care clinic or to a brokerage case management model that linked patients to community-based services. Service use and clinical outcomes were collected at baseline, three months and six months post randomization on all participants. Results Access to and participation in mental health /substance abuse services was greater in the integrated model than in referral; there were no treatment by ethnicity effects. There were no treatment effects for any of the clinical outcomes; Whites and older minorities in both integrated and referral groups failed to show clinically significant improvement in symptoms and physical functioning at 6 months. Conclusions While providing services in primary care results in better access to and use of these services, accessing these services is not enough for assuring adequate clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Personal characteristics and depression-related attitudes of older adults and participation in stages of implementation of a multi-site effectiveness trial (PRISM-E)

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 10 2005
    Marsha N. Wittink
    Abstract Background No study has assessed attitudes about depression and its treatment and participation at each step of recruitment and implementation of an effectiveness trial. Our purpose was to determine the association between personal characteristics and attitudes of older adults about depression with participation at each step of the Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for the Elderly (PRISM-E) treatment effectiveness trial. Methods Information on personal characteristics and attitudes regarding depression and its treatment were obtained from all potential participants in PRISM-E. Results Persons who reported better social support were more likely to complete a baseline interview, but were less likely to meet with the mental health professional carrying out the intervention. Attitudes about taking medicines were significantly associated with uptake of the intervention, but not with earlier phases of recruitment. Persons were much more likely to have a visit with the mental health professional for treatment of depression if they were willing to take medicine for depression but did not endorse waiting for the depression to get better [odds ratio (OR),=,3.16, 95% confidence interval (CI),=,1.48,6.75], working it out on one's own (OR,=,5.18, 95% CI,=,1.69,15.85), or talking to a minister, priest, or rabbi (OR,=,2.01, 95% CI,=,1.02,3.96). Conclusion Social support and other personal characteristics may be the most appropriate for tailoring recruitment strategies, but later steps in the recruitment and implementation may require more attention to specific attitudes towards antidepressant medications. Copyright © 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Unique Characteristics of Emergency Care Research: Scope, Populations, and Infrastructure

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 10 2009
    D. Mark Courtney MD
    Abstract The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program and the 2006 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report on the future of emergency care highlight the need for coordinated emergency care research (ECR) to improve the outcomes of acutely ill or injured patients. In response, the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) sponsored the Emergency Care Research Network (ECRN) Conference in Washington, DC, on May 28, 2008. The conference objectives were to identify the unique nature of ECR and the infrastructure needed to support ECR networks and to understand the optimal role of emergency medicine (EM) and other acute care specialties in research networks. Prior to the conference, participants responded to questions addressing the relevant issues that would form the basis of breakout session discussions; two of these breakout questions are summarized in this report: 1) what makes EM research unique? and 2) what are the critical components needed to establish and maintain networked ECR? Emergency care research was defined as "the systematic examination of patient care that is expected to be continuously available to diverse populations presenting with undifferentiated symptoms of acute illness, or acutely decompensated chronic illness, and whose outcomes depend on timely diagnosis and treatment." The chain of ECR may extend beyond the physical emergency department (ED) in both place and time and integrate prehospital care, as well as short- and long-term outcome determination. ECR may extend beyond individual patients and have as the focus of investigation the actual system of emergency care delivery itself and its effects on the community with respect to access to care, use of resources, and cost. Infrastructure determinants of research network success identified by conference participants included multidisciplinary collaboration, accurate long-term outcome determination, novel information technology, intellectual infrastructure, and wider network relationships that extend beyond the ED. [source]


    Involving Service Users in Health and Social Care Research

    BRITISH JOURNAL OF LEARNING DISABILITIES, Issue 3 2008
    Nicola Illingworth
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The Birmingham International Workshop on Supportive, Palliative, and End-of-Life Care Research

    CANCER, Issue 4 2006
    Neil A. Hagen MD
    The authors outline the context, discussions, and recommendations of the International Symposium on Supportive, Palliative, and End of Life Care, which was held October 5 and 6, 2005 in Birmingham, England. The potential benefits and challenges of international collaborative research activities are highlighted in supportive, palliative, and end-of-life care within the broader health care research community. [source]


    The Zerhouni Challenge: Defining the Fundamental Hypothesis of Emergency Care Research

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 2007
    Robert W. Neumar MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Brief alcohol intervention,where to from here?

    ADDICTION, Issue 6 2010
    Challenges remain for research, practice
    ABSTRACT Brief intervention (BI) is intended as an early intervention for non-treatment-seeking, non-alcohol-dependent, hazardous and harmful drinkers. This text provides a brief summary of key BI research findings from the last three decades and discusses a number of knowledge gaps that need to be addressed. Five areas are described: patient intervention efficacy and effectiveness; barriers to BI implementation by health professionals; individual-level factors that impact on BI implementation; organization-level factors that impact on BI implementation; and society-level factors that impact on BI implementation. BI research has focused largely upon the individual patient and health professional levels, with the main focus upon primary health care research, and studies are lacking in other settings. However, research must, to a larger degree, take into account the organizational and wider context in which BI occurs, as well as interaction between factors at different levels, in order to advance the understanding of how wider implementation of BI can be achieved in various settings and how different population groups can be reached. It is also important to expand BI research beyond its current parameters to investigate more ambitious long-term educational programmes and new organizational models. More widespread implementation of BI will require many different interventions (efforts, actions, initiatives, etc.) at different interlinked levels, from implementation interventions targeting individual health professionals' knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours concerning alcohol issues, BI and behaviour change counselling to efforts at the organizational and societal levels that influence the conditions for delivering BI as part of routine health care. [source]


    The effect of involvement in participatory research on parent researchers in a Sure Start programme

    HEALTH & SOCIAL CARE IN THE COMMUNITY, Issue 6 2006
    Ann Rowe M Med Sci BA RN RHVArticle first published online: 24 AUG 200
    Abstract Involving service users, patients and members of local communities in health and social care research is becoming increasingly common. However, surprisingly little research has been carried out to examine the experiences of such lay researchers. This paper presents the findings of a study to investigate the experiences of a group of parent researchers involved in a community survey within a UK Sure Start programme. The survey was undertaken to provide insight into the early impact of the programme and inform Sure Start programme expansion. Researchers were recruited from the local community and were given an accredited training programme, before working on the development of the research itself. They took a lead role in the development, data collection, analysis and report writing phases of the survey and have been actively involved with the dissemination of findings. In order to gain insight into the experiences of the lay researchers involved in this work, three separate methods were used to collect data: questionnaires before and after the study, a focus group at the end of the data collection phase and by analysis of personal diaries kept by the parent researchers. Findings reported include lay researchers responses to the accredited training programme, the development of new skills and understanding, access and the conduct of interviews and the impact of the work both for Sure Start and the researchers themselves. Some of the strengths and difficulties of participatory research are discussed and comment made on the extent to which lay involvement impacted on the conduct of the survey. [source]


    Managed Behavioral Health Care: An Instrument to Characterize Critical Elements of Public Sector Programs

    HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH, Issue 4 2002
    M. Susan Ridgely
    Objective. To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and ,unmanaged" care and among managed care arrangements. Study Design. The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data Collection Methods. Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. Principal Findings This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. Conclusions. If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary. [source]


    Creating consumer satisfaction in maternity care: the neglected needs of migrants, asylum seekers and refugees

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CONSUMER STUDIES, Issue 2 2007
    Birgit Jentsch
    Abstract An estimated 190 million people are now living outside their countries of birth or citizenship, and the rate of this migration is expected to remain high. The resulting growing cultural and ethnic diversity in societies adds specific challenges to the requirement of delivering public services such as health care to consumers. Globally, about half of the migrant population are women. Migrants' outcomes of pregnancy are known to be poor, showing significant disparities when compared with those of native populations. Although these disparities have been noted, knowledge is limited regarding the availability and accessibility of healthcare services, as well as the acceptability of maternity care for women with experiences of free and forced migration. Healthcare research in general, and maternity care research specifically, have often neglected this population. This paper examines the existing international guidelines intended to address inequities in health outcomes, policies which have been introduced at national levels, and the widely used concepts of ,patient-centred' and ,woman-centred' health services. The ideals implicit in those guidelines and concepts are contrasted with the available evidence of many overseas nationals' experiences with healthcare provisions in general, and maternity care in particular. This is followed by reflections on deficiencies in current studies and on those methodological problems which make research on maternity care for migrant women particularly challenging. The conclusion considers the appropriateness and relevance of guidelines currently promoting equity in maternity care and suggests a future agenda for priority research. [source]


    Literature review: considerations in undertaking focus group research with culturally and linguistically diverse groups

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 6 2007
    Elizabeth J Halcomb BN, IC Cert
    Aims., This integrated literature review seeks to identify the key considerations in conducting focus groups and discusses the specific considerations for focus group research with culturally and linguistically diverse groups. Background., The focus group method is a technique of group interview that generates data through the opinions expressed by participants. Focus groups have become an increasingly popular method of data collection in health care research. Although focus groups have been used extensively with Western populations, they are a particularly useful tool for engaging culturally and linguistically diverse populations. The success of focus groups in this context is dependent upon the cultural competence of the research team and the research questions. Methods., The electronic databases Medline, CINAHL, Embase, Psychlit and the Internet using the Google Scholar search engine were explored using the search terms ,focus group', ,cultural sensitivity', ,transcultural nursing', ,transcultural care', ,cultural diversity' and ,ethnic groups'. Hand searching of reference lists and relevant journals was also undertaken. English language articles were selected for the review if they discussed the following issues: (i) methodological implications of the focus group method; (ii) strengths and limitations of the focus group method; (iii) recommendations for researchers and (iv) use of the focus group in culturally and linguistically diverse groups. Conclusions were drawn from each of the articles and consensus regarding a summary of recommendations was derived from a minimum of two authors. Results., Findings from this review revealed several key issues involving focus group implementation including recruitment, sample size, data collection, data analysis and use within multicultural populations. Strengths and limitations of the focus group method were also identified. Conclusions., Focus groups are a useful tool to expand existing knowledge about service provision and identify consumer needs that will assist in the development of future intervention programmes, particularly within multicultural populations. Careful planning related to methodological and pragmatic issues are critical in deriving effective data and protecting participants. Relevance to clinical practice., Focus groups can facilitate increased understanding of perspectives of culturally and linguistically diverse groups and thereby shape clinical practice to better meet the needs of these groups. [source]


    Bayeswatch: an overview of Bayesian statistics

    JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 2 2002
    Peter C. Austin PhD
    Abstract Increasingly, clinical research is evaluated on the quality of its statistical analysis. Traditionally, statistical analyses in clinical research have been carried out from a ,frequentist' perspective. The presence of an alternative paradigm , the Bayesian paradigm , has been relatively unknown in clinical research until recently. There is currently a growing interest in the use of Bayesian statistics in health care research. This is due both to a growing realization of the limitations of frequentist methods and to the ability of Bayesian methods explicitly to incorporate prior expert knowledge and belief into the analyses. This is in contrast to frequentist methods, where prior experience and beliefs tend to be incorporated into the analyses in an ad hoc fashion. This paper outlines the frequentist and Bayesian paradigms. Acute myocardial infarction mortality data are then analysed from both a Bayesian and a frequentist perspective. In some analyses, the two methods are seen to produce comparable results; in others, they produce different results. It is noted that in this example, there are clinically relevant questions that are more easily addressed from a Bayesian perspective. Finally, areas in clinical research where Bayesian ideas are increasingly common are highlighted. [source]


    Researching nursing practice: does person-centredness matter?,

    NURSING PHILOSOPHY, Issue 3 2003
    Brendan McCormack DPhil (Oxon ) BSc (Hons) Nursing PGCEA RGN RMN
    Abstract Person-centredness is common speak in nursing and health care literature. Increasingly there is an expectation that practitioners adopt person-centred principles in their practice and organizations are expected to respect the values of the service user. However, in the research methodology literature, there is little explicit attention paid to the concept of person-centredness in research practice. Instead, there continues to be a reliance on traditional ,ethical principles' to guide effectiveness in research work. This paper argues that the principles of person-centredness that are espoused in nursing practice should also underpin nursing and health care research. A framework for person-centred research is proposed and issues concerning its implementation in practice are discussed. [source]


    The challenges and opportunities for transitional care research

    PEDIATRIC TRANSPLANTATION, Issue 6 2010
    J. E. McDonagh
    McDonagh JE, Kelly DA. The challenges and opportunities for transitional care research. Pediatr Transplantation 2010: 14:688,700. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Abstract:, The provision of healthcare for young people with solid organ transplants as they move into adult-centered services has received increasing attention over recent years particularly as non-adherence and graft loss increase after transfer. Despite medical advances and that transitional care is now well established on national and international health agendas, progress in the research arena has unfortunately been slow. The aims of this paper are to consider why this is and discuss the particular challenges facing clinical researchers working within the area. [source]


    IPOS Sutherland Memorial Lecture: psycho-oncology and health care research

    PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, Issue 6 2008
    Uwe KochArticle first published online: 2 MAY 200
    Abstract Remarkable changes of health-care systems, increasing costs of health care and of social inequality in modern societies, an aging population and the increase of chronic illnesses such as cancer implicate various future challenges for the provision of health care. Health-care research aims to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of patient-oriented services involving the evaluation of innovative treatment approaches and settings. It deals with the patients' path through different areas of health-care systems in order to identify significant factors for the provision of quality assurance of structures and resources concerning treatments, processes and health outcomes. Health-care research focusses on three main topics that play an important role for quality management: (1) the admission to health-care services and assessment strategies including indication, utilization and specificity of settings and target groups; (2) the treatment process including the implementation, standardization and flexibility of services and dose-effect relationship of interventions; (3) health-care outcome including effectiveness and efficiency of interventions and services, the cost-benefit relationship and the transfer from research to health-care practice. Given the objectives of health-care research, the topics of health-care research in psychosocial care for cancer patients include the study of structural conditions of psycho-oncological services, the epidemiology of distress and mental disorders and the subjective need of psycho-oncological support in cancer patients, the improvement of psycho-oncological measures and assessment strategies in daily treatment, the study of psycho-oncological interventions under routine conditions, and quality assurance. Requirements of future health-care research and developments of psycho-oncology including aspects of orientation, strategies, health-care equity, and resources are discussed. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    Accuracy in the outcomes and assessment information set (OASIS): Results of a video simulation

    RESEARCH IN NURSING & HEALTH, Issue 4 2003
    Elizabeth A. Madigan
    Abstract There is little information regarding the accuracy of the Outcomes and Assessment Information Set (OASIS), the patient assessment tool mandated for use in Medicare-funded home health care. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the accuracy of OASIS completion by home health nurses and rehabilitation therapists, to compare responses of nurses and therapists, and to determine whether dispersion of answers would affect the home health resource group (HHRG) to which patients were assigned for Medicare home health care payments to agencies. Using a video simulation of admission and discharge visits, 436 clinicians from 29 Ohio home health care agencies scored selected OASIS items. Although the majority of the items were rated accurately, discrepancies were found between clinician responses and the "correct" answer on several items. Nurses and therapists provided similar ratings on most items studied, but for most cases in which discrepancies were found, nurses were more likely to agree with the "correct" answer. Discrepancies most often led to patients being assigned to lower-payment HHRGs. Continued monitoring of OASIS data collection accuracy is recommended to maximize the value of the OASIS instrument in home health care research, practice, and policy. © 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Res Nurs Health 26:273,283, 2003 [source]


    Unique Characteristics of Emergency Care Research: Scope, Populations, and Infrastructure

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 10 2009
    D. Mark Courtney MD
    Abstract The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) program and the 2006 Institute of Medicine (IOM) Report on the future of emergency care highlight the need for coordinated emergency care research (ECR) to improve the outcomes of acutely ill or injured patients. In response, the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) sponsored the Emergency Care Research Network (ECRN) Conference in Washington, DC, on May 28, 2008. The conference objectives were to identify the unique nature of ECR and the infrastructure needed to support ECR networks and to understand the optimal role of emergency medicine (EM) and other acute care specialties in research networks. Prior to the conference, participants responded to questions addressing the relevant issues that would form the basis of breakout session discussions; two of these breakout questions are summarized in this report: 1) what makes EM research unique? and 2) what are the critical components needed to establish and maintain networked ECR? Emergency care research was defined as "the systematic examination of patient care that is expected to be continuously available to diverse populations presenting with undifferentiated symptoms of acute illness, or acutely decompensated chronic illness, and whose outcomes depend on timely diagnosis and treatment." The chain of ECR may extend beyond the physical emergency department (ED) in both place and time and integrate prehospital care, as well as short- and long-term outcome determination. ECR may extend beyond individual patients and have as the focus of investigation the actual system of emergency care delivery itself and its effects on the community with respect to access to care, use of resources, and cost. Infrastructure determinants of research network success identified by conference participants included multidisciplinary collaboration, accurate long-term outcome determination, novel information technology, intellectual infrastructure, and wider network relationships that extend beyond the ED. [source]


    Structure and Function of Emergency Care Research Networks: Strengths, Weaknesses, and Challenges

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 10 2009
    Linda Papa MD
    Abstract The ability of emergency care research (ECR) to produce meaningful improvements in the outcomes of acutely ill or injured patients depends on the optimal configuration, infrastructure, organization, and support of emergency care research networks (ECRNs). Through the experiences of existing ECRNs, we can learn how to best accomplish this. A meeting was organized in Washington, DC, on May 28, 2008, to discuss the present state and future directions of clinical research networks as they relate to emergency care. Prior to the conference, at the time of online registration, participants responded to a series of preconference questions addressing the relevant issues that would form the basis of the breakout session discussions. During the conference, representatives from a number of existing ECRNs participated in discussions with the attendees and provided a description of their respective networks, infrastructure, and challenges. Breakout sessions provided the opportunity to further discuss the strengths and weaknesses of these networks and patterns of success with respect to their formation, management, funding, best practices, and pitfalls. Discussions centered on identifying characteristics that promote or inhibit successful networks and their interactivity, productivity, and expansion. Here the authors describe the current state of ECRNs and identify the strengths, weaknesses, and potential pitfalls of research networks. The most commonly cited strengths of population- or disease-based research networks identified in the preconference survey were access to larger numbers of patients; involvement of physician experts in the field, contributing to high-level study content; and the collaboration among investigators. The most commonly cited weaknesses were studies with too narrow a focus and restrictive inclusion criteria, a vast organizational structure with a risk of either too much or too little central organization or control, and heterogeneity of institutional policies and procedures among sites. Through the survey and structured discussion process involving multiple stakeholders, the authors have identified strengths and weaknesses that are consistent across a number of existing ECRNs. By leveraging the strengths and addressing the weaknesses, strategies can be adopted to enhance the scientific value and productivity of these networks and give direction to future ECRNs. [source]


    Facilitating Emergency Care Research Networks: Integration into the Clinical Translational and Science Award (CTSA) Infrastructure

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 10 2009
    Judd E. Hollander MD
    Abstract Emergency care research (ECR) does not fit neatly into the traditional National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding model, because emergency research involves undifferentiated disease presentations involving multiple disciplines and time-sensitive interventions. A task force of emergency care researchers and other stakeholders was convened to discuss the present and future state of clinical research networks. Integration of ECR with the Clinical Translational and Science Award (CTSA) program through a multidisciplinary emergency care research network (ECRN) would obviate the duplication of research efforts by disease-specific or institute-specific multicenter networks and reduce startup and maintenance costs. Strategies to enhance integration must include the training of emergency physician investigators in biostatistical and epidemiologic methods, as well as educating collaborative investigators in emergency care,related methodologies. Thus, an ECRN would be of great benefit to CTSA awardees and applicants and should be considered a priority. [source]


    Obstacles to involving children and young people in foster care research

    CHILD & FAMILY SOCIAL WORK, Issue 4 2002
    Robyn Gilbertson
    ABSTRACT Despite increasing recognition of the importance of including the perspectives of children and young people in care in alternative care research, in practice this is not always a straightforward matter. This paper describes the recruitment of disruptive young people in care under the jurisdiction of the South Australian statutory authority to three studies on placement instability. Non-response rates of 72.5% and 82% are reported. A large number of subjects were excluded because agency social workers did not cooperate with the project, and more subjects were excluded for reasons which suggest high levels of distress in this population. The dilemma of providing a voice to distressed subjects when distressed subjects are excluded from research is discussed, and the appointment of an independent representative for children in care to review research proposals and to negotiate research access to children is proposed. [source]


    Executive Summary: The Institute of Medicine Report and the Future of Academic Emergency Medicine: The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine and Association of Academic Chairs in Emergency Medicine Panel: Association of American Medical Colleges Annual Meeting, October 28, 2006

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 3 2007
    Daniel A. Handel MD
    The findings in the Institute of Medicine's Future of Emergency Care reports, released in June 2006, emphasize that emergency physicians work in a fragmented system of emergency care with limited interhospital and out-of-hospital care coordination, too few on-call specialists, minimal disaster readiness, strained inpatient resources, and inadequate pediatric emergency services. Areas warranting special attention at academic medical centers (AMCs), both those included within the report and others warranting further attention, were reviewed by a distinguished panel and include the following: 1) opportunities to strengthen and leverage the educational environment within the AMC emergency department; 2) research opportunities created by emergency medicine (EM) serving as an interdisciplinary bridge in the area of clinical and translational research; 3) enhancement of federal guidelines for observational and interventional emergency care research; 4) recognition of the importance of EM residency training, the role of academic departments of EM, and EM subspecialty development in critical care medicine and out-of-hospital and disaster medicine; 5) further assessment of the impact of a regional emergency care model on patient outcomes and exploration of the role of AMCs in the development of such a model (e.g., geriatric and pediatric centers of EM excellence); 6) t e opportunity to use educational loan forgiveness to encourage rural EM practice and the development of innovative EM educational programs linked to rural hospitals; and 7) the need to address AMC emergency department crowding and its adverse effect on quality of care and patient safety. Strategic plans should be developed on a local level in conjunction with support from national EM organizations, allied health care, specialty organizations, and consumer groups to help implement the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine report. The report recommendations and other related recommendations brought forward during the panel discussions should be addressed through innovative programs and policy development at the regional and federal levels. [source]