Care Mental Health (care + mental_health)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Care Mental Health

  • primary care mental health


  • Selected Abstracts


    Teamwork in primary care mental health: a policy analysis

    JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, Issue 6 2008
    BSc (Hons), Dip HE (Mental Health Nursing), ELOISE NOLAN MSc
    Aim, This paper reports a policy analysis conducted to examine the potential impact of recent mental health policy on team working in Primary Care Mental Health in England. Method, An analysis of relevant policy documents was conducted. From an original selection of 49 documents, 15, which had significant implications for Primary Care Mental Health Teams, were analysed thematically. Findings, There were no clear guidelines or objectives for Primary Care Mental Health Teams evident from the policy analysis. Collaborative working was advocated, yet other elements in the policies were likely to prevent this occurring. There was a lack of clarity concerning the role and function of new professions within Primary Care Mental Health Teams, adding further uncertainty to an already confused situation. Conclusion, This uncertainty has the potential to reinforce professional barriers and increase the current difficulties with team working. Implications to nursing managers, An analysis of recent policy contributes to our understanding of the context of care. The lack of clarity in current health policy presents a significant challenge for those managing primary care mental health teams. Team working is likely to improve if targets, processes and responsibilities are made clearer. [source]


    Latest news and product developments

    PRESCRIBER, Issue 10 2007
    Article first published online: 13 SEP 200
    Sitagliptin: novel drug for type 2 diabetes Sitagliptin (Januvia), the first dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, has been introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in combination with metformin or a glitazone when either agent plus exercise and diet fail to control blood glucose. Inhibition of DPP-4 prevents the breakdown of incretin hormones that promote insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. In trials lasting up to 24 weeks, adding sitagliptin to established therapy reduced HbA1C by 0.67-0.90 per cent. It is contraindicated in patients with moderate or more severe renal impairment. At the recommended dose of 100mg per day, a month's treatment with sitagliptin costs 33.36. Guide to treating mentalillness in primary care A new guide from the Centre for Clinical and Academic Workforce Innovation aims to help health professionals and others treating people with mental illness. A Complete Guide to Primary Care Mental Health, a toolkit presented as a reference book and CD, covers aspects of treatment, the law and working with the voluntary sector and includes training materials compatible with evidence-based guidance. Copies are available from amazon.co.uk. Follow-up improves statin adherence Patients may take long holidays from statin treatment but a visit to the doctor is among the most effective ways to improve adherence, a US study shows (Arch Intern Med 2007;167:847,52). Observation of 239 911 patients who began statin treatment during a seven-year period showed that 54 per cent stopped their treatment for at least 90 days. Of these, 48 per cent restarted within one year and 60 per cent within two years. Factors associated with restarting treatment were a visit to the doctor who prescribed the statin (odds ratio, OR, 6.1) or a visit to a different doctor (OR 2.9). A cholesterol test and hospital admission for a cardiovascular event were also significant factors. Pharmacist MUR does not reduce heart failure deaths Medication review by trained community pharmacists does not reduce admissions or deaths among patients with heart failure, according to a study from East Anglia (BMJ online: 23 April 2007; doi:10.1136/bmj.39164.568183.AE). Patients admitted as emergencies with heart failure were randomised to usual care or two home visits by a community pharmacist within two and eight weeks after discharge. Pharmacists reviewed medication and advised on self-management of symptoms and lifestyle. There were no significant differences in hospital admissions over the next six months (rate ratio 1.15 for pharmacist vs control) or deaths (rate ratio 1.18); quality of life scores were similar in the two groups. The authors speculate that the interventions may have been too brief or too late (lifestyle changes having been made already), or disadvantaged by not adjusting beta-blocker doses. A Cardiff study of pharmacist medication reviews for elderly patients (BMJ online: 20 April 2007; doi:10.1136/bmj.39171. 577106.55), found that their advice had the potential to undermine patients' ,confidence, integrity and self-governanc'. The study found that pharmacists gave advice unnecessarily and uninvited. CHD targets met early The national programme to tackle heart disease has made substantial progress towards it targets, the Department of Health says in a 10-year report, and a 40 per cent cut in mortality will be achieved ahead of the deadline of 2010. Coronary Heart Disease Ten Years On: Improving Heart Care, a report by Professor Roger Boyle, National Director for Heart Disease and Stroke, states that 7 per cent of the population is now taking statins, resulting in 9700 deaths avoided annually. The prevalence of untreated hypertension fell from 32 to 24 per cent between 1998 and 2003. The report also summarises changes in service delivery, nutrition and smoking cessation. HRT: ovarian cancer risk The MHRA has not altered its advice on the use of HRT following news that five years' use increases ovarian cancer risk in women over 50. The Million Women Study revealed an approximately 20 per cent increased risk of ovarian cancer or death among women still using HRT after five or more years. There was no difference in risk between oestrogen-only and combined formulations. The MHRA says HRT is still indicated for relieving symptoms of the menopause for short-term use; as an alternative for women over 50 who cannot take other treatments to prevent osteoporosis, or when such options fail; and in women under 50 who experience a premature menopause. Poor angina treatment Over half of patients with angina continue to experience attacks despite treatment, according to a survey by the British Cardiac Patients Association. The survey of 600 patients with angina also found that twot-hirds of respondents reported that angina had a moderate to severe impact on their lives. Half said that the adverse effects of their treatment negatively affected their work, two-thirds reported an adverse impact on sex, and almost three-quarters of patients taking beta-blockers reported fatigue. A second survey of 2000 adults revealed widespread ignorance about the prevalence and symptoms of angina. The surveys were sponsored by Servier Laboratories Limited and conducted in collaboration with Research Quorum. Cabergoline restriction Indications for the dopamine agonist cabergoline (Cabaser) are being restricted to match those of pergolide (Celance), the MHRA has announced. Pergolide was recently withdrawn in the United States and its use in the EU is limited because of the risk of cardiac valvular damage. Similar toxicity has been reported with cabergolide, which is now restricted to second-line use when a nonergot treatment for Parkinson's disease has failed. It is contraindicated in patients with valvular damage or a history of fibrotic disorders and requires patient monitoring. Sodium reduction cuts CV events Long-term reduction in dietary sodium may reduce cardiovascular events by 25 per cent, US epidemiologists say (BMJ online: 20 April 2007; doi:10.1136/bmj.39147.604896.55). Participants in the two Trials of Hypertension Prevention (TOHP I and II) reduced their sodium intake by 44 and 33mmol per 24hr. After 10,15 years' follow-up of 2415 participants, the adjusted relative risk of cardiovascular events was 0.75 compared with controls. There was a nonsignificant 20 per cent reduction in mortality. Copyright 2007 Wiley Interface Ltd [source]


    Dangers of diagnostic labels in patients with mental health issues

    PROGRESS IN NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY, Issue 5 2009
    A Robinson MBChB, DRCOG
    Progress is pleased to bring readers key articles from the charity Primary Care Mental Health and Education (Primhe), which covers issues relating particularly to mental health in the primary care setting. On our website, www.progressnp.com, this month Dr Robinson, a GP with a special interest in mental health,describes how an encounter with a patient led her to re-evaluate her approach to patients with mental health issues. Copyright 2009 Wiley Interface Ltd [source]


    Primary care mental health: a new frontier for psychology

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
    William B. Gunn
    Abstract The medical system in this country is divided into primary care and specialty care. Mental health is for the most part a specialty service dependent on referrals, often from primary care providers. The authors propose a new model where psychologists work in collaboration with primary care medical teams. This integrated, coordinated model enables psychologists to help patients they would not otherwise see in a mental health system. Examples of patients in this category are seniors, those with somatizing disorders, and those experiencing the challenges of dealing with a chronic illness. This model also enables psychologists to provide consultation to the medical teams. In this article, the authors discuss the world of the primary care medical team and present the rationale for integration or collaboration. They describe the barriers to collaborative practices and ways to overcome these barriers. Finally, they present practical strategies that psychologists can use on a regular basis to increase their collaboration with primary care. These strategies can be used by those who work in colocated practices as well as those who work in separate locations. 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Psychol 65:1,18, 2009. [source]


    Teamwork in primary care mental health: a policy analysis

    JOURNAL OF NURSING MANAGEMENT, Issue 6 2008
    BSc (Hons), Dip HE (Mental Health Nursing), ELOISE NOLAN MSc
    Aim, This paper reports a policy analysis conducted to examine the potential impact of recent mental health policy on team working in Primary Care Mental Health in England. Method, An analysis of relevant policy documents was conducted. From an original selection of 49 documents, 15, which had significant implications for Primary Care Mental Health Teams, were analysed thematically. Findings, There were no clear guidelines or objectives for Primary Care Mental Health Teams evident from the policy analysis. Collaborative working was advocated, yet other elements in the policies were likely to prevent this occurring. There was a lack of clarity concerning the role and function of new professions within Primary Care Mental Health Teams, adding further uncertainty to an already confused situation. Conclusion, This uncertainty has the potential to reinforce professional barriers and increase the current difficulties with team working. Implications to nursing managers, An analysis of recent policy contributes to our understanding of the context of care. The lack of clarity in current health policy presents a significant challenge for those managing primary care mental health teams. Team working is likely to improve if targets, processes and responsibilities are made clearer. [source]