Care Insurance (care + insurance)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Care Insurance

  • long-term care insurance


  • Selected Abstracts


    The Private Market for Long-Term Care Insurance in the United States: A Review of the Evidence

    JOURNAL OF RISK AND INSURANCE, Issue 1 2009
    Jeffrey R. Brown
    This article reviews the growing literature on the market for private long-term care insurance, a market notable for its small size despite the fact that long-term care expenses are potentially large and highly uncertain. After summarizing long-term care utilization and insurance coverage in the United States, the article reviews research on the supply of and the demand for private long-term care insurance. It concludes that demand-side factors impose important limits on the size of the private market and that we currently have a limited understanding of how public policies could be designed to encourage the growth of this market. [source]


    Quantifying Dementia Care in Japan: A Discussion on the Long-Term Care Insurance

    PSYCHOGERIATRICS, Issue 2 2001
    Shivani Nandi PhD
    Abstract: The Japanese government mandated the kaigohoken, or Long Term Care Insurance (LTCI) in December 1997. In view of the pressures faced by Japan as an aged society, the aim of the LTCI is to alleviate the burden of providing care for frail older people by ensuring good quality and readily available services to everyone over 65. The LTCI is thus a high profile, age-based entitlement program,age based for persons 65 years of age and above, and age related disability based for ages 40 to 64. Individuals 40 years and above, including foreigners living in Japan for more than a year, are responsible in bearing a part of the financial responsibility by having to pay the mandatory premium. The benefits that the insured person receives are decided after evaluating the care requirement. Care is quantified by being categorized into six levels of increasing requirement, starting from support required, through five levels of increasing care. As is well known, caring for a person with dementia is further complicated by accompanying psychiatric disturbances which in turn increase caregiver burden. Thus the fundamental difficulty in dealing with the care of persons with dementia such as Alzheimer's disease, which is the most common form of dementia, is the evaluation procedure preceding entitlement. We find that the statistical program of the LTCI employed in the initial stage of the evaluation contains discrepancies, and tends to overemphasize bed ridden patients over people with dementia. This paper is a study of the status of people with dementia in Japan, the mechanism of the assessment method, and the problems associated with it. [source]


    Fewer hours of care yet undiminished caregiver burden with new long-term care insurance in Japan

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GERIATRIC PSYCHIATRY, Issue 5 2002
    Yumiko Arai
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Health care insurance in Japan: Beyond a binary vision of State and family

    INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SECURITY REVIEW, Issue 3 2009
    Kusuto Na´to
    Abstract Despite significant regional diversity in household structures and the existence of community solidarity in Japan, caring for elderly dependent persons has traditionally been considered an exclusively family, and female, responsibility. However, as a result of socio-demographic changes during the second half of the twentieth century, a public system of health care insurance was introduced in 2000. The objective of this development was to "socialize" family and female care activities. This article presents a critical analysis of Japan's health care insurance system and the context that gave rise to its introduction. An important issue is whether the system meets the needs of the elderly and their carers (family and non-family). A further issue is whether the system can take account of regional diversity, diversity in household situations (above and beyond financial concerns), and societal values and beliefs. The article concludes by arguing that demographic ageing presents a societal requirement for the ongoing adjustment of behaviour patterns and living arrangements. [source]


    The Private Market for Long-Term Care Insurance in the United States: A Review of the Evidence

    JOURNAL OF RISK AND INSURANCE, Issue 1 2009
    Jeffrey R. Brown
    This article reviews the growing literature on the market for private long-term care insurance, a market notable for its small size despite the fact that long-term care expenses are potentially large and highly uncertain. After summarizing long-term care utilization and insurance coverage in the United States, the article reviews research on the supply of and the demand for private long-term care insurance. It concludes that demand-side factors impose important limits on the size of the private market and that we currently have a limited understanding of how public policies could be designed to encourage the growth of this market. [source]


    Evaluation of gender differences in caregiver burden in home care: Nagoya Longitudinal Study of the Frail Elderly (NLS-FE)

    PSYCHOGERIATRICS, Issue 3 2006
    Yoshihisa HIRAKAWA
    Abstract Background:, Japan is presently experiencing a growth in the number of male caregivers and this situation has given rise to some concerns over gender differences. Previous studies have suggested that there are gender differences in caregiver burden in home care, however, it is still unclear whether or not gender differences exist. We therefore conducted this study to attain a better understanding of the Japanese male caregiver burden in home care, using data from the Nagoya Longitudinal Study of Frail Elderly (NLS-FE). Methods:, NLS-FE is a large prospective study of community-dwelling elderly persons eligible for public long-term care insurance who live in Nagoya city and use the services of the Nagoya City Health Care Service Foundation for Older People, which comprises 17 visiting nursing stations and corresponding care-managing centers, from November to December 2003. Data used in this study included the Japanese version of the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview, caregivers' and dependents' characteristics, and the caregiving situation. The differences in dependent and caregiver characteristics between male and female caregiver groups were assessed using the ,2 -test for categorical variables or the unpaired t -test for continuous variables. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the association between dependent and caregiver characteristics and caregiver burden. Results:, A total of 399 male caregivers and 1193 female caregivers were included in our analysis. Before and after controlling baseline variables, we did not detect a difference between male and female caregivers with respect to caregiver burden. Conclusion:, Our study suggests that differences in caregiver burden may not necessarily exist between male and female caregivers in Japan. [source]


    Learning from Japanese Experience in Aged Care Policy

    ASIAN SOCIAL WORK AND POLICY REVIEW, Issue 1 2007
    Guat Tin Ng
    Like Singapore, Japan is projected to age rapidly. Japan is the first country in the world where more than 20% of the total population is over 65. Even as Japan adapts from western Europe and America where population ageing is more advanced up till now, it has been pioneering its own aged care policy, given the differences in sociocultural and political contexts. Of particular interest is its introduction of long-term care insurance and its effectiveness in meeting the needs of the long-term care of the aged and their family caregivers. In this article I seek to compare and contrast Singapore and Japan in terms of their demographic changes leading to rapid ageing, and their respective policy and program responses to a rapidly ageing population, drawing lessons from the Japanese experience. [source]


    Implications of Question Format in Emergency Department Preventive Health Knowledge Surveys

    ACADEMIC EMERGENCY MEDICINE, Issue 6 2007
    Roland C. Merchant MD
    Objectives:To determine if respondents differed by their demography (age group, race or ethnicity, and insurance status) in their tendency to correctly answer knowledge-based questions when they were in an agree-disagree instead of a multiple-choice format. Methods:Women aged 18,55 years seeking treatment in the emergency department completed surveys of preventive health knowledge on three cancer screening tests (Pap smears, breast self-examinations, and mammograms) and two contraceptive measures (birth control pills and emergency contraception) that contained paired versions of questions in two different formats (agree-disagree format and multiple-choice format). Linear and ordinal regressions were used to determine demographic correlates of correctly answering the agree-disagree questions more often than the corresponding multiple-choice questions. Results:Of the 570 women included in this analysis, 64.6% were younger than 35 years, 62.1% were white, and 54.8% had private health care insurance. Older, white, and privately insured women demonstrated greater comprehension of all topics. Younger women, nonwhite women, and women without private health care insurance were more likely to respond to items correctly when they were in an agree-disagree format compared with a multiple-choice format. Conclusions:This study demonstrated that survey responses are influenced by the format of the questions, particularly in certain demographic groups. Policy makers and researchers might draw false conclusions about the baseline knowledge and need for education of patients, especially in these populations. The use of agree-disagree format questions in preventive health knowledge surveys should be avoided whenever possible. [source]