Care Home Residents (care + home_resident)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Flu: Effect of Vaccine in Elderly Care Home Residents: A Randomized Trial

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 12 2007
Fiona Gaughran MD
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether assessing seroprotection after influenza vaccine and administering booster vaccination where not achieved reduces hospitalization and death. To estimate the overall seroprotection rate of influenza vaccine. DESIGN: A two-arm, partially blind, randomized, multicenter, parallel-group, controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-six care homes in three South London boroughs in fall 2004. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-seven elderly permanent care home residents meeting eligibility criteria. INTERVENTION: Postvaccination blood samples were randomized to booster evaluation or no booster evaluation (control). If evaluation revealed inadequate seroprotection, a booster vaccine was administered. MEASUREMENTS: Primary outcome was hospitalization to end April 2005; secondary outcomes were death, antibiotic use, and seroprotection. RESULTS: Sixty percent of the controls and 41% of the booster evaluation group responded to routine vaccination. Booster vaccination where indicated increased seroprotection rates in the booster evaluation group to 66%. Treatment groups did not differ in any outcome measures in the intention-to-treat analysis (hospitalization odds ratio=1.02, 95% confidence interval=0.55,1.87). There was a tendency towards greater differences between groups in the per-protocol analysis than in the intention-to-treat analysis, particularly regarding seroprotection rates. The same effect was observed in the a priori exploratory analysis of residents not seroprotected after routine vaccination alone. CONCLUSION: In a year without circulating influenza, there is no clinical benefit of administering a booster vaccine if routine trivalent vaccination fails to result in seroprotection. Hemagglutination titers rose in two strains postbooster vaccination but fell against the novel strain, Wyoming. The benefit of such a booster strategy when influenza is prevalent thus remains unc ertain. [source]


Clinical medication review by a pharmacist of elderly people living in care homes: pharmacist interventions

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHARMACY PRACTICE, Issue 2 2007
David P Alldred research clinical pharmacist
Objectives To describe the rate and nature of pharmacist interventions following clinical medication review of elderly people living in care homes. Setting Care home residents aged 65+ years, prescribed at least one repeat medication, living in nursing, residential and mixed care homes for older people in Leeds, UK. Method Analysis of data from care home residents receiving clinical medication review in the intervention arm of a randomised controlled trial. Intervention outcomes for each medicine were evaluated for each resident. Key findings Three-hundred and thirty-one residents were randomised to receive a clinical medication review and 315 (95%) were reviewed by the study pharmacist; 256 (77%) residents had at least one recommendation made to the general practitioner. For the 2280 medicines prescribed, there were 672 medicine-related interventions: medicines for cardiovascular system (167 (25%)), nutrition and blood (121 (18%)), central nervous system (113 (17%)) and gastrointestinal conditions (86 (13%)) accounted for 487 (73%) of medicine-related interventions. There were 75 non-medicine-related interventions. The most common interventions were ,technical' (225 (30%)), ,test to monitor medicine' (161 (22%)), ,stop drug' (100 (13%)), ,test to monitor conditions' (75 (10%)), ,start drug' (76 (10%)), ,alter dose' (40 (5%)) and ,switch drug' (37 (5%)). Recommendations to stop a medicine were most common for CNS drugs (32 (32%)). The most common medicine to be recommended to be started was calcium and vitamin D (45 (59%)). Following a recommendation to test to monitor a medicine, 23 (14%) medicines required a change. Conclusions This study has demonstrated that clinical medication review by a pharmacist can identify medicine problems in approximately 80% of care home residents, requiring intervention in 1 in 4 of their prescribed medications. [source]


Flu: Effect of Vaccine in Elderly Care Home Residents: A Randomized Trial

JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 12 2007
Fiona Gaughran MD
OBJECTIVES: To determine whether assessing seroprotection after influenza vaccine and administering booster vaccination where not achieved reduces hospitalization and death. To estimate the overall seroprotection rate of influenza vaccine. DESIGN: A two-arm, partially blind, randomized, multicenter, parallel-group, controlled trial. SETTING: Twenty-six care homes in three South London boroughs in fall 2004. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred seventy-seven elderly permanent care home residents meeting eligibility criteria. INTERVENTION: Postvaccination blood samples were randomized to booster evaluation or no booster evaluation (control). If evaluation revealed inadequate seroprotection, a booster vaccine was administered. MEASUREMENTS: Primary outcome was hospitalization to end April 2005; secondary outcomes were death, antibiotic use, and seroprotection. RESULTS: Sixty percent of the controls and 41% of the booster evaluation group responded to routine vaccination. Booster vaccination where indicated increased seroprotection rates in the booster evaluation group to 66%. Treatment groups did not differ in any outcome measures in the intention-to-treat analysis (hospitalization odds ratio=1.02, 95% confidence interval=0.55,1.87). There was a tendency towards greater differences between groups in the per-protocol analysis than in the intention-to-treat analysis, particularly regarding seroprotection rates. The same effect was observed in the a priori exploratory analysis of residents not seroprotected after routine vaccination alone. CONCLUSION: In a year without circulating influenza, there is no clinical benefit of administering a booster vaccine if routine trivalent vaccination fails to result in seroprotection. Hemagglutination titers rose in two strains postbooster vaccination but fell against the novel strain, Wyoming. The benefit of such a booster strategy when influenza is prevalent thus remains unc ertain. [source]


Effect of Tai Chi on state self-esteem and health-related quality of life in older Chinese residential care home residents

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL NURSING, Issue 8 2007
Linda YK Lee PhD, MNurs
[source]


Enhancing diabetes care pathways for older people with type 2 diabetes: a special case of care home residents

PRACTICAL DIABETES INTERNATIONAL (INCORPORATING CARDIABETES), Issue 3 2007
18 March 200, A poster submitted by AJ Sinclair, Lisbon, Portugal, adapted for publication in Practical Diabetes International, on behalf of UK delegates attending the European MasterClass in Diabetes
No abstract is available for this article. [source]