Care Data (care + data)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Patients' perceptions of nursing care in the hospital setting

JOURNAL OF ADVANCED NURSING, Issue 4 2003
Lee A. Schmidt PhD RN
Background., Patient satisfaction and patient satisfaction with nursing care data are routinely collected as an indicator of the quality of services delivered. Despite the widespread collection and reporting of these data, the theoretical basis of patient satisfaction and patient satisfaction with nursing care remains unclear. Without a clear theoretical base, interpretation of patient satisfaction findings is hampered and the entire line of patient satisfaction research is of questionable validity. It has been suggested that, to understand patient satisfaction, patient perceptions of their care must first be understood. Aim., The aim of this study was to discover patients' perceptions of the nursing care they receive in the hospital setting. Method., Grounded theory method was used in this study of eight medical,surgical patients recently discharged from an academic medical centre in the south-eastern United States of America (USA). Participants were interviewed and the verbatim transcripts analysed using the constant comparative method. Findings., Four categories of patient perceptions of their nursing care emerged from the data. ,Seeing the individual patient' captures the unique nature of the nursing care experience for each patient. ,Explaining' represents the informal explanations given by nursing staff as they provide care. ,Responding' refers to both the character and timeliness of nursing staff's responses to patient requests or symptoms. ,Watching over' represents the surveillance activities of nursing staff. Conclusions., The categories identified in this study may be used in efforts to further develop a formal theory of patient satisfaction with nursing care. These categories should also be tested with patients possessing a wider range of characteristics, to assess the transferability of the findings. [source]


Prescribing information systems; making sense of primary care data

JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PHARMACY & THERAPEUTICS, Issue 4 2001
S. R. Chapman BSc PhD MRPharmS
[source]


Using participatory methods and geographic information systems (GIS) to prepare for an hiv community-based trial in Vulindlela, South Africa (Project Accept,HPTN 043),,

JOURNAL OF COMMUNITY PSYCHOLOGY, Issue 1 2009
Admire Chirowodza
Recent attempts to integrate geographic information systems (GIS) and participatory techniques, have given rise to terminologies such as participatory GIS and community-integrated GIS. Although GIS was initially developed for physical geographic application, it can be used for the management and analysis of health and health care data. Geographic information systems, combined with participatory methodology, have facilitated the analysis of access to health facilities and disease risk in different populations. Little has been published about the usefulness of combining participatory methodologies and GIS technology in an effort to understand and inform community-based intervention studies, especially in the context of HIV. This article attempts to address this perceived gap in the literature. The authors describe the application of participatory research methods with GIS in the formative phase of a multisite community-based social mobilization trial, using voluntary counseling and testing and post-test support as the intervention. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Health care data and health: from numbers to outcomes,

PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY AND DRUG SAFETY, Issue 5 2001
William L. Roper MD
First page of article [source]


THE EFFECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL FORM IN THE MIXED MARKET FOR FOSTER CARE

ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2010
Jeremy Thornton
ABSTRACT,:,This paper uses proprietary quality of care data to examine the consequences of organizational form in privatized US foster care services. The contract failure hypothesis generically proposes that nonprofits should provide higher quality services, relative to for-profits, when output is costly to observe. Advocates argue that the nonprofits offer important consumer protections when public services are contracted to private agencies. Contrary to expectations, we find that nonprofit firms do not offer higher quality services. We explore the possibility that monitoring efforts by state regulators or competition among foster care agencies effectively mitigate the influence of organizational form in this particular mixed market. [source]