Care Continuum (care + continuum)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


The Utility of Heart Sounds and Systolic Intervals Across the Care Continuum

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE, Issue 2006
W. Frank Peacock MD
Acoustic cardiography is an exciting, new, easy-to-use, modernized technology that incorporates already proven techniques of phonocardiography. Application of acoustic cardiography to clinical practice can improve diagnosis and management of heart failure patients. Its clinical use should help address some of the need for robust, inexpensive, and widely accessible technology for proactive heart failure diagnosis and management. Acoustic cardiographically recorded measurements have been correlated with both cardiac catheterization and echocardiographically determined hemodynamic parameters. Heart sounds captured by acoustic cardiograms have proven to assist clinicians in assessing dyspneic patients in the emergency department by utilizing the strong specificity of an S3 for detecting acute decompensated heart failure. Acoustic cardiography offers a cost-efficient, easy-to-use method to optimize the devices used in cardiac resyncronization therapy. The rapidly and easily obtainable information gathered by acoustic cardiography should foster its more widespread use in diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, including cardiac resyncronization therapy device optimization. [source]


The Utility of Heart Sounds and Systolic Intervals Across the Care Continuum

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE, Issue 2006
W. Frank Peacock MD
Acoustic cardiography is an exciting, new, easy-to-use, modernized technology that incorporates already proven techniques of phonocardiography. Application of acoustic cardiography to clinical practice can improve diagnosis and management of heart failure patients. Its clinical use should help address some of the need for robust, inexpensive, and widely accessible technology for proactive heart failure diagnosis and management. Acoustic cardiographically recorded measurements have been correlated with both cardiac catheterization and echocardiographically determined hemodynamic parameters. Heart sounds captured by acoustic cardiograms have proven to assist clinicians in assessing dyspneic patients in the emergency department by utilizing the strong specificity of an S3 for detecting acute decompensated heart failure. Acoustic cardiography offers a cost-efficient, easy-to-use method to optimize the devices used in cardiac resyncronization therapy. The rapidly and easily obtainable information gathered by acoustic cardiography should foster its more widespread use in diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, including cardiac resyncronization therapy device optimization. [source]


History and Trends in Clinical Information Systems in the United States

JOURNAL OF NURSING SCHOLARSHIP, Issue 1 2001
Nancy Staggers
Purpose: To provide a synopsis of issues about clinical information systems for nurses not schooled in nursing informatics. Organizing construct: The past, present, and future of clinical computing, including major factors resulting in the early hospital information systems (HIS) and decision support systems (DSS) in the United States, current advances and issues in managing clinical information, and future trends and issues. Methods: Literature review and analysis. Findings and Conclusions: The first HIS and DSS were used in the late 1960s and were focused on applications for acute care. The change from fee-for-service to managed care required a change in the design of clinical information systems toward more patient-centered systems that span the care continuum, such as the computer-based patient record (CPR). Current difficulties with CPR systems include lack of systems integration, data standardization, and implementation. Increased advances in information and technology integration and increased use of the Internet for health information will shape the future of clinical information systems. [source]


Research institute for nurse scientists responds to the challenge to expand and strengthen research focused on breast cancer in African American women,

CANCER, Issue S2 2007
Sandra Millon Underwood RN
Abstract In an era where scientifically derived ,evidence' is used as a basis for nursing practice, it is imperative that nurses have a breadth of knowledge relative to the fundamentals of nursing science; knowledge of the current standards of nursing and medical practice; and knowledge of the characteristics, needs, concerns, and challenges of diverse consumer and patient population groups. Yet, while a significant body of ,evidence' that describes the experiences and needs of African American women across the breast care continuum has been generated, research suggests that there is a need to expand and strengthen this body of science. This report presents an overview of a decade of research focused on breast cancer among African American women and describes an initiative funded by the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation to expand and strengthen nursing science that aims to reduce and/or eliminate excess breast cancer morbidity and mortality among African American women. Cancer 2007. 2006 American Cancer Society. [source]