Care

Distribution by Scientific Domains
Distribution within Medical Sciences

Kinds of Care

  • NH care
  • abortion care
  • acute care
  • acute hospital care
  • acute mental health care
  • acute stroke care
  • adequate care
  • adult care
  • aged care
  • aid care
  • all-inclusive care
  • allied health care
  • ambulatory care
  • animal care
  • antenatal care
  • appropriate care
  • appropriate health care
  • asthma care
  • basic health care
  • behavioral health care
  • bereavement care
  • best care
  • biparental care
  • breast cancer care
  • brood care
  • burn care
  • cancer care
  • cardiac care
  • catheter care
  • center care
  • child care
  • child health care
  • chiropractic care
  • chronic care
  • client care
  • clinical care
  • collaborative care
  • community care
  • competent care
  • complex care
  • comprehensive care
  • continence care
  • continuing care
  • conventional care
  • cost-effective care
  • critical care
  • day care
  • delivery care
  • dementia care
  • dental care
  • department care
  • depression care
  • diabetes care
  • dietetic care
  • direct care
  • direct patient care
  • due care
  • early care
  • early child care
  • effective care
  • efficient care
  • elderly care
  • emergency care
  • emergency dental care
  • emergency department care
  • emergency medical care
  • end-of-life care
  • epilepsy care
  • extra care
  • eye care
  • failure care
  • family care
  • family-centred care
  • follow-up care
  • foot care
  • formal care
  • foster care
  • geriatric care
  • good care
  • good patient care
  • great care
  • greater care
  • group care
  • gynecologic care
  • h care
  • health care
  • health nursing care
  • heart failure care
  • high quality care
  • high-quality care
  • hiv care
  • holistic care
  • home care
  • home health care
  • home nursing care
  • hospice care
  • hospital care
  • hygiene care
  • immediate care
  • improving care
  • in-patient care
  • infant care
  • informal care
  • inpatient care
  • institutional care
  • integrate care
  • intensive care
  • intermediate care
  • intrapartum care
  • kangaroo care
  • kinship care
  • life care
  • long-term care
  • male care
  • male parental care
  • managed care
  • maternal care
  • maternity care
  • medicaid managed care
  • medical care
  • mental health care
  • mental health nursing care
  • midwifery care
  • modern health care
  • mother care
  • multidisciplinary care
  • musculoskeletal care
  • neonatal care
  • neonatal intensive care
  • newborn care
  • nursing care
  • nursing home care
  • nutritional care
  • obstetric care
  • obstetrical care
  • oncology care
  • ongoing care
  • operative care
  • optimal care
  • optimal patient care
  • oral care
  • oral health care
  • oral hygiene care
  • orthopaedic care
  • out-of-home care
  • out-patient care
  • outpatient care
  • own care
  • paediatric care
  • paediatric intensive care
  • pain care
  • palliative care
  • parental care
  • paternal care
  • patient care
  • patient-centred care
  • pediatric care
  • pediatric emergency care
  • people receiving care
  • perinatal care
  • periodontal care
  • perioperative care
  • permanent care
  • personal care
  • pharmaceutical care
  • physical care
  • physician care
  • poor care
  • post-fledging care
  • postnatal care
  • postoperative care
  • postpartum care
  • posttransplant care
  • practice care
  • pregnancy care
  • prehospital care
  • prehospital emergency care
  • prenatal care
  • preventative care
  • preventive care
  • primary care
  • primary health care
  • professional care
  • provided care
  • psychiatric care
  • psychiatric inpatient care
  • psychological care
  • psychosocial care
  • public care
  • public dental care
  • quality care
  • quality health care
  • quality nursing care
  • quality patient care
  • receiving care
  • rehabilitation care
  • rehabilitative care
  • reproductive health care
  • residential aged care
  • residential care
  • residential respite care
  • respite care
  • restorative care
  • routine antenatal care
  • routine care
  • routine clinical care
  • routine health care
  • rural emergency care
  • rural health care
  • safe care
  • safe patient care
  • secondary care
  • self care
  • shared care
  • skin care
  • social care
  • special care
  • special health care
  • specialist care
  • specialized care
  • specialty care
  • spiritual care
  • standard care
  • stroke care
  • suboptimal care
  • support care
  • supportive care
  • surgical care
  • survivorship care
  • terminal care
  • tertiary care
  • topical skin care
  • traditional care
  • transitional care
  • trauma care
  • ulcer care
  • urgent care
  • usual care
  • usual medical care
  • veterinary care
  • wound care

  • Terms modified by Care

  • care access
  • care act
  • care activity
  • care administrator
  • care admission
  • care agencies
  • care agency
  • care alone
  • care approach
  • care area
  • care arena
  • care arrangement
  • care assessment team
  • care assistant
  • care available
  • care bed
  • care being
  • care beneficiary
  • care bundle
  • care burden
  • care center
  • care centre
  • care children hospital
  • care client
  • care clinic
  • care clinician
  • care community
  • care consultation
  • care contact
  • care context
  • care continuum
  • care coordination
  • care cost
  • care coverage
  • care culture
  • care data
  • care database
  • care decision
  • care decision making
  • care delivery
  • care delivery system
  • care demand
  • care department
  • care dependency
  • care disparity
  • care doctor
  • care education
  • care encounter
  • care enrollee
  • care environment
  • care episode
  • care ethics
  • care evaluation
  • care expenditure
  • care expense
  • care experience
  • care facility
  • care factor
  • care field
  • care financing
  • care for children
  • care formulations
  • care group
  • care groups
  • care guideline
  • care habit
  • care health plan
  • care home
  • care home resident
  • care hospital
  • care industry
  • care information
  • care institution
  • care insurance
  • care interface
  • care intervention
  • care issues
  • care journal
  • care leader
  • care level
  • care literature
  • care management
  • care manager
  • care managers
  • care mapping
  • care market
  • care measure
  • care measurement
  • care medical center
  • care medicine
  • care mental health
  • care model
  • care models
  • care need
  • care network
  • care nurse
  • care nurse practitioner
  • care nursery
  • care nursing
  • care nursing practice
  • care only
  • care option
  • care organisation
  • care organization
  • care outcome
  • care outreach team
  • care participant
  • care partnership
  • care pathway
  • care patient
  • care pattern
  • care personnel
  • care perspective
  • care physician
  • care placement
  • care plan
  • care planning
  • care policy
  • care population
  • care possible
  • care practice
  • care practitioner
  • care preference
  • care principle
  • care priority
  • care problem
  • care procedure
  • care process
  • care products
  • care profession
  • care professional
  • care program
  • care programme
  • care project
  • care protocol
  • care provider
  • care provision
  • care quality
  • care recipient
  • care record
  • care referral center
  • care requirement
  • care research
  • care research network
  • care resident
  • care resource
  • care response
  • care retirement community
  • care scale
  • care sector
  • care service
  • care services
  • care services for children
  • care setting
  • care shortage
  • care site
  • care skill
  • care social work
  • care society
  • care specialist
  • care staff
  • care standards
  • care status
  • care stay
  • care strategy
  • care support
  • care survey
  • care system
  • care task
  • care teaching hospital
  • care team
  • care technology
  • care therapy
  • care time
  • care today
  • care training
  • care transfer
  • care treatment
  • care trust
  • care unit
  • care unit admission
  • care unit nurse
  • care unit patient
  • care unit setting
  • care unit stay
  • care university hospital
  • care use
  • care utilization
  • care visit
  • care ward
  • care work
  • care worker
  • care workforce

  • Selected Abstracts


    FEDERAL MEDICAID ASSISTANCE TO STATES: IMPACT ON PRENATAL CARE

    CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC POLICY, Issue 3 2008
    SWATI MUKERJEE
    In the context of dramatically increasing U.S. health-care costs, this paper contributes to an ongoing debate discussing proposals to replace the government's current policy of matching state Medicaid spending with a block grant system. State-level panel data analysis provides evidence that, ceteris paribus, increasing the federal matching formula has a negative impact on prenatal care. This aggregate result masks significant differences between high- and low-spending states and appears to be driven by the high-spending states thus implying that a 2-track approach to Medicaid funding may be more appropriate than the current system. (JEL I1, H7) [source]


    BOOT CAMP PRISONS AND CORRECTIONS POLICY: MOVING FROM MILITARISM TO AN ETHIC OF CARE

    CRIMINOLOGY AND PUBLIC POLICY, Issue 2 2006
    FAITH E. LUTZE
    First page of article [source]


    PALLIATIVE CARE, PUBLIC HEALTH AND JUSTICE: SETTING PRIORITIES IN RESOURCE POOR COUNTRIES

    DEVELOPING WORLD BIOETHICS, Issue 3 2009
    CRAIG BLINDERMAN
    ABSTRACT Many countries have not considered palliative care a public health problem. With limited resources, disease-oriented therapies and prevention measures take priority. In this paper, I intend to describe the moral framework for considering palliative care as a public health priority in resource-poor countries. A distributive theory of justice for health care should consider integrative palliative care as morally required as it contributes to improving normal functioning and preserving opportunities for the individual. For patients requiring terminal care, we are guided less by principles of justice and more by the duty to relieve suffering and society's commitment to protecting the professional's obligation to uphold principles of beneficence, compassion and non-abandonment. A fair deliberation process is necessary to allow these strong moral commitments to serve as reasons when setting priorities in resource poor countries. [source]


    DEFINING STANDARD OF CARE IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD: THE INTERSECTION OF INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH ETHICS AND HEALTH SYSTEMS ANALYSIS

    DEVELOPING WORLD BIOETHICS, Issue 2 2005
    ADNAN A. HYDER
    ABSTRACT In recent years there has been intense debate regarding the level of medical care provided to ,standard care' control groups in clinical trials in developing countries, particularly when the research sponsors come from wealthier countries. The debate revolves around the issue of how to define a standard of medical care in a country in which many people are not receiving the best methods of medical care available in other settings. In this paper, we argue that additional dimensions of the standard of care have been hitherto neglected, namely, the structure and efficiency of the national health system. The health system affects locally available medical care in two important ways: first, the system may be structured to provide different levels of care at different sites with referral mechanisms to direct patients to the appropriate level of care. Second, inefficiencies in this system may influence what care is available in a particular locale. As a result of these two factors locally available care cannot be equated with a national ,standard'. A reasonable approach is to define the national standard of care as the level of care that ought to be delivered under conditions of appropriate and efficient referral in a national system. This standard is the minimum level of care that ought to be provided to a control group. There may be additional moral arguments for higher levels of care in some circumstances. This health system analysis may be helpful to researchers and ethics committees in designing and reviewing research involving standard care control groups in developing country research. [source]


    ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ASPECTS OF AGED CARE

    ECONOMIC PAPERS: A JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECONOMICS AND POLICY, Issue 1 2005
    Warren P. Hogan
    The focus of this article is on the Report of the inquiry into residential aged care in Australia. Consideration is given to the results of a confidential survey of financial submissions from providers of aged care. Most attention is given to labour costs and earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA). The most important result is the evidence showing providers whatever their size, location, ownership and resident mix, can perform in the top 10 per cent and 25 per cent of providers as measured by EBITDA. Management is vital to the performance of entities whether they be ,for-profit' or ,not-for-profit' entities. Attention is also directed to other studies about efficiency and productivity and modelling. Treating technical efficiency as a measure by which the industry lags behind best practice, the analysis of regulatory efficiency explains much about ways to secure gains in efficiency. [source]


    [Commentary] DATABASE LINKAGE: OUTSIDE REFLECTIONS ON HEALTH CARE INSIDE PRISONS

    ADDICTION, Issue 7 2009
    SHEILA M. BIRD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    EVOLUTIONARY PATHWAYS IN SHOREBIRD BREEDING SYSTEMS: SEXUAL CONFLICT, PARENTAL CARE, AND CHICK DEVELOPMENT

    EVOLUTION, Issue 10 2005
    Gavin H. Thomas
    Abstract Sexual selection, mating opportunities, and parental behavior are interrelated, although the specific nature of these relationships is controversial. Two major hypotheses have been suggested. The parental investment hypothesis states that the relative parental investment of the sexes drives the operation of sexual selection. Thus, the sex that invests less in offspring care competes more intensely and monopolizes access to mates. The sexual conflict hypothesis proposes that sexual selection (the competition among both males and females for mates), mating opportunities, and parental behavior are interrelated and predicts a feedback loop between mating systems and parental care. Here we test both hypotheses using a comprehensive dataset of shorebirds, a maximum-likelihood statistical technique, and a recent supertree of extant shorebirds and allies. Shorebirds are an excellent group for these analyses because they display unique variation in parental care and social mating system. First, we show that chick development constrains the evolution of both parental care and mate competition, because transitions toward more precocial offspring preceded transitions toward reduced parental care and social polygamy. Second, changes in care and mating systems respond to one another, most likely because both influenced and are influenced by mating opportunities. Taken together, our results are more consistent with the sexual conflict hypothesis than the parental investment hypothesis. [source]


    ALIGNING INCENTIVES AND MOTIVATIONS IN HEALTH CARE: THE CASE OF EARNED AUTONOMY

    FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY & MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2007
    Russell Mannion
    Delegating greater authority and decision making power to front line organisations, including devolution of control through the system of ,Earned Autonomy' is a key component of the UK Government's modernisation agenda for the public services. The principle of Earned Autonomy is that the highest performing organisations are subject to less central control and allowed increased operating freedoms. This paper explores the implementation of Earned Autonomy in the English NHS and addresses the question of whether the incentives implicit within Earned Autonomy are both sufficiently powered and aligned to the motivations of senior hospital managers to secure the desired improvements in organisational performance. [source]


    THE INTERSECTIONS OF GENDER AND GENERATION IN ALBANIAN MIGRATION, REMITTANCES AND TRANSNATIONAL CARE

    GEOGRAFISKA ANNALER SERIES B: HUMAN GEOGRAPHY, Issue 1 2009
    Russell King
    ABSTRACT. The Albanian case represents the most dramatic instance of post-communist migration: about one million Albanians, a quarter of the country's total population, are now living abroad, most of them in Greece and Italy, with the UK becoming increasingly popular since the late 1990s. This paper draws on three research projects based on fieldwork in Italy, Greece, the UK and Albania. These projects have involved in-depth interviews with Albanian migrants in several cities, as well as with migrant-sending households in different parts of Albania. In this paper we draw out those findings which shed light on the intersections of gender and generations in three aspects of the migration process: the emigration itself, the sending and receiving of remittances, and the care of family members (mainly the migrants' elderly parents) who remain in Albania. Theoretically, we draw on the notion of ,gendered geographies of power' and on how spatial change and separation through migration reshapes gender and generational relations. We find that, at all stages of the migration, Albanian migrants are faced with conflicting and confusing models of gender, behavioural and generational norms, as well as unresolved questions about their legal status and the likely economic, social and political developments in Albania, which make their future life plans uncertain. Legal barriers often prevent migrants and their families from enjoying the kinds of transnational family lives they would like. [source]


    Making Nutrition Services Work for Socially Excluded Groups: Lessons from the Integrated Nutrition and Health Project

    IDS BULLETIN, Issue 4 2009
    Mukesh Kumar
    A relatively large proportion of India's underweight children belong to groups facing multiple disadvantages. Addressing child malnutrition among these communities is critical if India is to eliminate undernutrition and achieve the MDG goals. This article draws evidence from the Integrated Nutrition and Health Project II (INHP-II), a USAID funded project, implemented by CARE in India, to show how, by ensuring universal service coverage, a programme can enhance equity and inclusion. INHP-approaches such as: Nutrition and health days (NHD); prioritising home contacts; system strengthening; community participation; tracking left-out children; enhancing convergence and coverage of nutritional and health services, all help to improve nutritional outcomes among all sections of society, particularly socially excluded groups. [source]


    THE EFFECT OF MATERNAL EMPLOYMENT AND CHILD CARE ON CHILDREN'S COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT,

    INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
    Raquel Bernal
    This article develops and estimates a dynamic model of employment and child care decisions of women after childbirth to evaluate the effects of these choices on children's cognitive ability. We use data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to estimate it. Results indicate that the effects of maternal employment and child care on children's ability are negative and sizable. Having a mother that works full-time and uses child care during one year is associated with a reduction in ability test scores of approximately 1.8% (0.13 standard deviations). We assess the impact of policies related to parental leave and child care on children's outcomes. [source]


    LONG-TERM CARE AND FAMILY BARGAINING*

    INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 1 2002
    MAXIM ENGERS
    We present a structural model of how families decide who should care for elderly parents. We use data from the National Long-Term Care Survey to estimate and test the parameters of the model. Then we use the parameter estimates to simulate the effects of the existing long-term trends in terms of the common but untested explanations for them. Finally, we simulate the effects of alternative family bargaining rules on individual utility to measure the sensitivity of our results to the family decision-making assumptions we make. [source]


    Numerical computation of cross-coupled algebraic Riccati equations related to H2/H, control problem for singularly perturbed systems

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ROBUST AND NONLINEAR CONTROL, Issue 8 2004
    Hiroaki Mukaidani
    Abstract In this paper, we present a numerical algorithm to the cross-coupled algebraic Riccati equations(CARE) related to H2/H, control problems for singularly perturbed systems (SPS) by means of Newton's method. The resulting algorithm can be widely used to solve Nash game problems and robust control problems because the CARE is solvable even if the quadratic term has an indefinite sign. We prove that the resulting iterative algorithm has the property of the quadratic convergence. Using the solution of the CARE, we construct the high-order approximate H2/H, controller. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


    ARE THE ASSESSING CARE OF VULNERABLE ELDERS QUALITY INDICATORS FOR HYPERTENSION WRONG?

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 7 2008
    David G. Sutin MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    ASSOCIATION BETWEEN ADVANCE DIRECTIVES AND QUALITY OF END-OF-LIFE CARE: A NATIONAL STUDY

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 1 2008
    Julie Starr RN
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    ACQUIRED HEMOPHILIA IN OLDER PEOPLE: A POOR PROGNOSIS DESPITE INTENSIVE CARE

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 10 2007
    Olivier Lambotte MD
    First page of article [source]


    STROKE UNITS AND ACUTE CARE FOR ELDERS MODEL OF CARE

    JOURNAL OF AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY, Issue 9 2004
    Renzo Rozzini MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    MEDICAL CARE AND TECHNOLOGY

    JOURNAL OF CLINICAL HYPERTENSION, Issue 10 2005
    Paul A. Macri MD
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    Older people specific health status and quality of life: a structured review of self-assessed instruments

    JOURNAL OF EVALUATION IN CLINICAL PRACTICE, Issue 4 2005
    Kirstie L. Haywood DPhil
    Abstract Objectives, To review evidence relating to the measurement properties of older people specific self-assessed, multi-dimensional measures of health status. Design, Systematic literature searches to identify instruments. Pre-defined criteria relating to reliability, validity, responsiveness, precision and acceptability. Results, A total of 46 articles relating to 18 instruments met the inclusion criteria. Most evidence was found for the OARS Multidimensional Functional Assessment Questionnaire (OMFAQ), CARE, Functional Assessment Inventory (FAI) and Quality of Life Profile , Seniors Version (QOLPSV). Most instruments have been evaluated in single studies. Four instruments have evidence of internal consistency and test,retest reliability , LEIPAD, Philadelphia Geriatrics Centre Multilevel Assessment Inventory, Perceived Well-being Scale, Wellness Index (WI). Two instruments lack evidence of reliability , Brief Screening Questionnaire, Geriatric Quality of Life Questionnaire (GQLQ). Older people contributed to the content of the GQLQ, QOLPSV and WI. Most instruments were assessed for validity through comparisons with other instruments, global judgements of health, or clinical and socio-demographic variables. Limited evidence of responsiveness was found for five instruments , GQLQ, OMFAQ, PGCMAI, QOLPSV, Self-Evaluation of Life Scale (SELF). Conclusion, Although most evidence was found for the OMFAQ this was largely for the ADL domain; evidence for reliability and responsiveness is limited. Limited evidence of reliability, validity and responsiveness was found for the PGCMAI, QOLPSV and SELF. The lack of evidence for measurement properties restricts instrument recommendation. Instrument content should be assessed for relevance before application and the concurrent evaluation of specific and widely used generic instruments is recommended. Several instruments, including the BSQ and EASY-Care, were developed recently and further evidence of instrument performance is required. [source]


    N -Acetylcysteine Added to Volume Expansion with Sodium Bicarbonate Does Not Further Prevent Contrast-Induced Nephropathy: Results from the Cardiac Angiography in Renally Impaired Patients Study

    JOURNAL OF INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY, Issue 3 2009
    CEZAR S. STANILOAE M.D.
    We reviewed data from the multicenter CARE (Cardiac Angiography in Renally Impaired Patients) study to see if benefit could be shown for N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in patients undergoing cardiac angiography who all received intravenous bicarbonate fluid expansion. Four hundred fourteen patients with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease were randomized to receive intra-arterial administration of iopamidol-370 or iodixanol-320. All patients were prehydrated with isotonic sodium bicarbonate solution. Each site chose whether or not to administer NAC 1,200 mg twice daily to all patients. Serum creatinine (SCr) levels and estimated glomerular filtration rate were assessed at baseline and 2,5 days after receiving contrast. The primary outcome was a postdose SCr increase 0.5 mg/dL (44.2 ,mol/L) over baseline. Secondary outcomes were a postdose SCr increase 25% and the mean peak change in SCr. The NAC group received significantly less hydration (892 236 mL vs. 1016 328 mL; P < 0.001) and more contrast volume (146 74 mL vs. 127 71 mL; P = 0.009) compared with no-NAC group. SCr increases 0.5 mg/dL occurred in 4.2% (7 of 168 patients) in NAC group and 6.5% (16 of 246 patients) in no-NAC group (P = 0.38); rates of SCr increases 25% were 11.9% and 10.6%, respectively (P = 0.75); mean post-SCr increases were 0.07 mg/dL in NAC group versus 0.11 mg/dL in no-NAC group (P = 0.14). In conclusion, addition of NAC to fluid expansion with sodium bicarbonate failed to reduce the rate of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) after the intra-arterial administration of iopamidol or iodixanol to high-risk patients with chronic kidney disease. [source]


    EMERGENCY PEDIATRICS: A GUIDE TO AMBULATORY CARE

    JOURNAL OF PAEDIATRICS AND CHILD HEALTH, Issue 5-6 2004
    Peter Barnett Dr
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    The correlation of voiding variables between non-instrumented uroflowmetery and pressure-flow studies in women with pelvic organ prolapse

    NEUROUROLOGY AND URODYNAMICS, Issue 6 2008
    Elizabeth Mueller
    Abstract Aims To (1) correlate peak and maximum flow rates from non-instrumented flow (NIF) and pressure-flow studies (PFS) in women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP); (2) measure the impact of voided volume and degree of prolapse on correlations. Methods We compared four groups of women with stages II,IV POP. Groups 1 and 2 were symptomatically stress continent women participating in the colpopexy and urinary reduction efforts (CARE) trial; during prolapse reduction before sacrocolpopexy, Group 1 (n,=,67) did not have and Group 2 (n,=,84) had urodynamic stress incontinence (USI). Group 3 (n,=,74) and Group 4 participants (n,=,73), recruited specifically for this study, had stress urinary incontinence (SUI) symptoms. Group 3 planned sacrocolpopexy. Group 4 planned a different treatment option. Participants completed standardized uroflowmetry and pressure voiding studies. Results Subjects' median age was 61 years; median parity 3% and 80% had stage III or IV POP. Based on the Blaivas,Groutz nomogram, 49% of all women were obstructed. NIF and PFS peak and average flow rates had low correlations with one another (0.31, P,<,0.001 and 0.35, P,<,0.001, respectively). When NIF and PFS voided volumes were within 25% of each other, the peak and average flow rate correlations improved (0.52, P,<,0.001 and 0.57, P,<,0.001, respectively). As vaginal prolapse increased, correlations between NIF and PFS peak and average flow rates decreased. Conclusion Peak and average flow rates are highly dependent on voided volume in women with prolapse. As the prolapse stage increases, correlations between NIF and PFS variables decrease. Neurourol. Urodynam. 27:515,521, 2008. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    PROVIDING CULTURALLY COMPETENT CARE

    NURSING FOR WOMENS HEALTH, Issue 5 2000
    STRATEGIES AND APPROACHES FOR PERINATAL CLIENTS
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    THE EUROPEAN ACADEMY OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY THE EUROPEAN DIPLOMA IN ANAESTHESIOLOGY AND INTENSIVE CARE

    ACTA ANAESTHESIOLOGICA SCANDINAVICA, Issue 2 2001
    Article first published online: 18 JUL 200
    No abstract is available for this article. [source]


    ENDOGENOUS HEALTH CARE, LIFE EXPECTANCY AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

    PACIFIC ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
    Michael C. M. Leung
    We study the endogenous relationship between health care, life expectancy and output in a neoclassical growth model. Although health care directly diverts resources away from goods production, it prolongs life expectancy, which in turn leads to higher savings and, hence, capital formation through a private annuity market. We show that savings and health care are complements in equilibrium, with both rising with economic development. Our model is therefore consistent with several observed stylized development patterns across countries. Moreover, through the longevity-enhancing channel, health care and health production technology are found by simulation to be growth and welfare promoting. [source]


    ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF STUDENTS IN FOSTER CARE: IMPEDED OR IMPROVED?

    PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 5 2004
    Larry D. Evans
    Foster care's impact on academic development was investigated for 392 students reentering foster care. Psychoeducational evaluation was performed at initial and return placements. Average achievement increased .22 points between placements. Students reentering care did not show differences in achievement or IQ compared to control students with a single placement. Although average achievement showed a small increase between placements, some students showed large changes. Declining achievement was directly related to above-average initial achievement ( p < .001), and indirectly related to not being in special education ( p < .001) and nonminority race ( p < .02). Results provide evidence that overall academic development appears neither enhanced nor hindered by foster care placement, but specific groups may be at risk for poor gains. 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Psychol Schs 41: 527,535, 2004. [source]


    CUSTOMER CARE AND THE PUBLIC SERVICE ETHOS

    PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION, Issue 4 2006
    CATHERINE E. NEEDHAM
    The Labour governments that have been in power in the UK since 1997 have reconceptualized the public service ethos. In an apparent departure from their Conservative predecessors, Labour ministers have argued that the distinctive culture of public service can enhance rather than impede service quality and deliver high levels of customer care. This article utilizes interviews and content analysis data to explore the ethical dimension of public service, the significance of the language of customer in relation to ethos, and the implications for service delivery of a customer care focus. Case study findings show that a customer orientation is endorsed by politicians and bureaucrats in both central and local government, although there is a lack of clarity about the service manifestations of such a shift in emphasis. Respondents voiced concerns about the viability of customer care in the public sector as well as the sidelining of the political role of citizen. [source]


    INDIVIDUAL EQUITY RETURN DATA FROM THOMSON DATASTREAM: HANDLE WITH CARE!

    THE JOURNAL OF FINANCIAL RESEARCH, Issue 4 2006
    Ozgur S. Ince
    Abstract We compare individual U.S. equity return data from Thomson Datastream (TDS) with similar data from the Center for Research in Security Prices (CRSP) to evaluate TDS for use in studies involving large numbers of individual equities in markets outside the United States. We document important issues of coverage, classification, and data integrity and find that naive use of TDS data can have a large impact on economic inferences. We show that after careful screening of the TDS data, inferences drawn from TDS data are similar to those drawn from CRSP. We illustrate the importance of the screens we develop using U.S. TDS data by applying the screens to TDS data from four European equity markets. [source]


    Outcomes research in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Lessons learned from the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis clinical assessment, research, and education database,

    ANNALS OF NEUROLOGY, Issue S1 2009
    FAAN, Robert G. Miller MD
    Objective To examine the care of patients with ALS following the publication of the standardized recommendations for the management of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) published in 1999 by the American Academy of Neurology. Methods Specific aspects of ALS patient management have been evaluated serially using a national Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Clinical Assessment, Research, and Education (ALS CARE) database to encourage compliance with these recommendations and to assure continuing quality improvement. Results The most recent analysis of 5,600 patients shows interesting epidemiological observations and treatment trends. Proper management of many ALS symptoms has increased substantially since the first publication of the guidelines, and awareness of pseudobulbar affect has increased. Other recommendations are underutilized: Only 9% undergo percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, although this procedure was recommended in 22% of patients; and noninvasive positive pressure ventilation was used by only 21% of patients despite being associated with improved 5-year survival rates. Interpretation This observational database has been a useful tool in monitoring compliance with the standard of care for patients with ALS and may have resulted in greater adherence to guidelines. Ann Neurol 2009;65 (suppl):S24,S28 [source]


    THE EFFECTS OF ORGANIZATIONAL FORM IN THE MIXED MARKET FOR FOSTER CARE

    ANNALS OF PUBLIC AND COOPERATIVE ECONOMICS, Issue 2 2010
    Jeremy Thornton
    ABSTRACT,:,This paper uses proprietary quality of care data to examine the consequences of organizational form in privatized US foster care services. The contract failure hypothesis generically proposes that nonprofits should provide higher quality services, relative to for-profits, when output is costly to observe. Advocates argue that the nonprofits offer important consumer protections when public services are contracted to private agencies. Contrary to expectations, we find that nonprofit firms do not offer higher quality services. We explore the possibility that monitoring efforts by state regulators or competition among foster care agencies effectively mitigate the influence of organizational form in this particular mixed market. [source]