Campaign Finance Laws (campaign + finance_law)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Reform in a Cold Climate: Change in US Campaign Finance Law

GOVERNMENT AND OPPOSITION, Issue 4 2005
Dean McSweeney
The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) of 2002 was the first major change in US federal campaign finance law in a quarter of a century. Many attempts at reform had failed in that period. Few members of Congress were enthusiasts for reform, the two parties and two chambers had conflicting interests to protect, successive presidents did not promote the issue and public pressure for reform was weak. When reform was achieved in 2002, many of these formidable obstacles remained in place. This paper draws on the literature of public interest reform and policy innovation to attribute the change to a policy entrepreneur whose resources had undergone a sharp increase, the neutralization of opposition, the impact of an event (the bankruptcy of the Enron Corporation) and membership turnover in Congress. The substantial support for the bill in Congress from Democrats, the party with most to lose from reform, is attributed to the inescapability of past commitments. [source]


Drafting campaign finance laws to survive challenges

NATIONAL CIVIC REVIEW, Issue 2 2006
Deborah Goldberg
First page of article [source]


A Comparative Analysis of Political Communication Systems and Voter Turnout

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF POLITICAL SCIENCE, Issue 2 2009
Mijeong Baek
This article explores how political communication institutions affect cross-national differences in voter turnout in democratic elections. It demonstrates how the structure and means of conveying political messages,gauged by media systems, access to paid political television advertising, and campaign finance laws,explain variations in turnout across 74 countries. Relying on a "mobilization" perspective, I argue that institutional settings that reduce information costs for voters will increase turnout. The major empirical findings are twofold. First, campaign finance systems that allow more money (and electioneering communication) to enter election campaigns are associated with higher levels of voter turnout. Second, broadcasting systems and access to paid political television advertising explain cross-national variation in turnout, but their effects are more complex than initially expected. While public broadcasting clearly promotes higher levels of turnout, it also modifies the effect of paid advertising access on turnout. [source]