Cm Mass (cm + mass)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Giant Multilocular Epidermoid Cyst on the Left Buttock

DERMATOLOGIC SURGERY, Issue 10 2005
Alexandros Polychronidis MD
Background. Epidermoid cysts are the most common cysts of the skin. They are generally small and slow-growing and rarely reach more than 5 cm in diameter. Objective. We present a patient with a giant multilocular epidermoid cyst. Methods. A 75-year-old man presented with a giant, soft, painless, tumorlike mass on the left buttock that had gradually enlarged over a 12-year period. Excision of the mass from the surrounding tissue was extremely easy because of a well-defined capsule. Results. The 28 3 14 3 12 cm mass was totally excised. A histopathologic examination revealed that it was an epidermoid cyst. Conclusion. This rare case of giant epidermoid cyst was treated successfully by local excision followed by primary closure. Dissection of the mass from the surrounding tissue was extremely easy because of a well-defined capsule. [source]


Clear cell sarcoma of soft tissue: diagnostic utility of fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction

JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS PATHOLOGY, Issue 4 2008
Choladda V. Curry
A 7-year-old girl presented with pain and progressive swelling on the left plantar surface. Biopsy of a 2.5 cm mass showed nests of large round to oval neoplastic cells with abundant amphophilic to clear cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli and high mitotic activity. Occasional cells showed spindled morphology. Infrequent melanin pigment was present. Melanocytic markers (HMB45, S-100) were diffusely positive. A diagnosis of clear cell sarcoma of soft tissue (CCSS) was made, and the mass was re-excised with negative margins. 28 months later, a 1.0 cm pulmonary nodule was identified and wedge excision showed metastatic CCSS. Cytogenetics showed a complex karyotype (unbalanced translocation der(12;14)(q10;q10), additional chromosome 22 material of unknown origin). Although the CCSS translocation t(12;22)(q13;q12) was not identified, EWSR1 gene rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed an EWS-ATF1 fusion transcript, confirmed by direct sequencing. CCSS requires differentiation from malignant melanoma, because of overlapping clinical presentations, sites of involvement, histomorphology, immunocytochemical profiles and ultrastructure. In many circumstances, definitive diagnosis is only possible with confirmation of the CCSS-defining translocation. [source]


Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Tissue with Cytogenetic and Molecular Analyses

JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS PATHOLOGY, Issue 1 2006
C. Vejabhuti
A 7-year-old girl presented with pain and progressive swelling on the left plantar surface. Biopsy of a 2.5 cm mass demonstrated nests of large oval tumor cells with high nuclear-to-cytoplasm ratio, amphophilic to clear cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and brisk mitotic activity. Occasional cells showed spindled morphology. Infrequent melanin pigment was present. Melanocytic markers (HMB45, S-100) were diffusely positive. A diagnosis of clear cell sarcoma of soft tissue (CCSS) was made, and the tumor was re-excision with negative margins. 28 months later, a 1.0 cm pulmonary nodule was identified and showed CCSS. Cytogenetics demonstrated a complex karyotype (unbalanced translocation der(12;14)(p10;q10), additional chromosome 22 material of unknown origin). Although the CCSS translocation t(12;22)(q13;q12) was not identified, EWSR1 gene rearrangement was detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). RT-PCR demonstrated an EWS-ATF1 fusion transcript, confirmed by direct sequencing. CCSS requires differentiation from malignant melanoma, due to overlapping clinical presentations, sites of involvement, histomorphology, immunocytochemical profiles, and ultrastructure. In many circumstances, definitive diagnosis is only possible with confirmation of the CCSS tumor-defining translocation. [source]


Mature teratoma of the uterine cervix with lymphoid hyperplasia

PATHOLOGY INTERNATIONAL, Issue 5 2003
Sung-chul Lim
A rare case of an extragonadal teratoma, which occurred primarily in the uterus, is described. The tumor developed in the uterine cervix as a conventional cervical polyp, 3 months after an elective abortion in a 27-year-old woman. Microscopically, the solid 2.2 1.8 1.5 cm mass was a mature teratoma with exuberant lymphoid elements. It consisted of ectodermal, mesodermal and endodermal derivatives. The lymphoid elements may have been a lymphoid hyperplasia, a chronic inflammatory reaction or a component of the teratoma. However, as the lymphoid tissues had no spatial relation to the teratomatous components, the possibility of a teratomatous element was excluded. This could be regarded as a result of an immunological reaction to the tissues composing the tumor, rather than just a chronic inflammatory response because the lymphoid reaction was present in the tumor, the tumor,host interface and the perivascular areas. Because of the patient's history of an abortion and a lymphoid reaction, the possibility of fetal remnants implantation was raised, so DNA typing to compare the teratoma portion with a normal portion of the host was performed. We found the teratoma portions to be in accordance with that of the host, and hence ruled out fetal remnants implantation. This case showed that a mature teratoma of the uterine cervix may manifest as a feature of implanted fetal tissue. In addition, a real teratoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of uterine teratomatous lesion, even when detected in patients with a recent history of pregnancy and lymphoid hyperplasia. [source]