Business Intelligence (business + intelligence)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Gender and Personality Differences in Self- and Other Ratings of Business Intelligence

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2005
Adrian Furnham
This paper is concerned with people's understanding of, and self-estimation on, various new ,business intelligences' and aims to examine whether these estimates were systematically related to personality dimensions. A total of 184 adult working participants completed a three-part questionnaire that measured their ,big five' personality traits (NEO-FFI), various beliefs about intelligence and also their own and their boss's estimated overall IQ score and scores on eight multiple business intelligences. Males rated their overall IQ as well as their cognitive, creative and political intelligence as significantly higher than females. Females rated their boss's overall, emotional and organizational IQ significantly higher than did male participants. Participants believed they had higher emotional, but lower political, organizational and network intelligence than their boss. Regressions indicated that only one of the eight estimated business intelligences (cognitive intelligence) was related to overall (total, general) estimated intelligence in self, boss or boss's boss. Regressing the big-five personality factors onto each of the self-estimates showed openness-to-experience was positively, and agreeableness negatively, related to most of the estimates. Those who had taken an intelligence test tended to giver higher self-estimates on overall intelligence. Implications of these results for business life are considered. [source]


A reference model for grid architectures and its validation

CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE & EXPERIENCE, Issue 11 2010
Wil van der Aalst
Abstract Computing and data-intensive applications in physics, medicine, biology, graphics, and business intelligence require large and distributed infrastructures to address the challenges of the present and the future. For example, process mining applications are faced with terrabytes of event data and computationally expensive algorithms. Computer grids are increasingly being used to deal with such challenges. However, grid computing is often approached in an ad hoc and engineering-like manner. Despite the availability of many software packages for grid applications, a good conceptual model of the grid is missing. This paper provides a formal description of the grid in terms of a colored Petri net (CPN). This CPN can be seen as a reference model for grids as it clarifies the basic concepts at the conceptual level. Moreover, the CPN allows for various kinds of analyses ranging from verification to performance analysis. We validate our model based on real-life experiments using a testbed grid architecture available in our group and we show how the model can be used for the estimation of throughput times for scientific workflows. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Intelligence-led policing at the Amsterdam-Amstelland Police Department: operationalized business intelligence with an enterprise ambition

INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS IN ACCOUNTING, FINANCE & MANAGEMENT, Issue 4 2009
Stijn Viaene
This article elaborates on the setup for intelligence-led policing in support of ensuring public safety as it presented itself in the Spring of 2007 at the Amsterdam-Amstelland Police Department in the Netherlands. The picture that is painted is the outcome of a qualitative research effort involving semi-structured interviews triangulated with other internal data sources. The main goal of the article is to establish how an organization can leverage its operationalized business intelligence ambition by connecting it into an ambition for better enterprise management. The case ends in showcasing two popular operational business intelligence tools instrumental to capacity management. Copyright 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


Gender and Personality Differences in Self- and Other Ratings of Business Intelligence

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2005
Adrian Furnham
This paper is concerned with people's understanding of, and self-estimation on, various new ,business intelligences' and aims to examine whether these estimates were systematically related to personality dimensions. A total of 184 adult working participants completed a three-part questionnaire that measured their ,big five' personality traits (NEO-FFI), various beliefs about intelligence and also their own and their boss's estimated overall IQ score and scores on eight multiple business intelligences. Males rated their overall IQ as well as their cognitive, creative and political intelligence as significantly higher than females. Females rated their boss's overall, emotional and organizational IQ significantly higher than did male participants. Participants believed they had higher emotional, but lower political, organizational and network intelligence than their boss. Regressions indicated that only one of the eight estimated business intelligences (cognitive intelligence) was related to overall (total, general) estimated intelligence in self, boss or boss's boss. Regressing the big-five personality factors onto each of the self-estimates showed openness-to-experience was positively, and agreeableness negatively, related to most of the estimates. Those who had taken an intelligence test tended to giver higher self-estimates on overall intelligence. Implications of these results for business life are considered. [source]