Business Ethics (business + ethics)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Corporate Governance and Business Ethics: insights from the strategic planning experience*

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, Issue 6 2005
Ingrid Bonn
In this paper we develop an integrated approach towards corporate governance and business ethics. Our central argument is that organisations can learn from the development of strategic planning in the 1970s and 1980s. We identify three weaknesses , a bureaucratic and formalised approach, lack of implementation and lack of integration throughout the organisation , which were prevalent in strategic planning in the past and which are potentially just as problematic for an integrated corporate governance approach to business ethics. We suggest ways these weaknesses might be avoided and provide questions for boards of directors to consider when integrating ethical concerns into their organisations' corporate governance structures. [source]


Virtue and Community in Business Ethics: A Critical Assessment of Solomon's Aristotelian Approach to Social Responsibility

JOURNAL OF SOCIAL PHILOSOPHY, Issue 4 2001
Roger J. H. King
[source]


Business Ethics as Practice

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2007
Stewart Clegg
In this article we develop a conceptualization of business ethics as practice. Starting from the view that the ethics that organizations display in practice will have been forged through an ongoing process of debate and contestation over moral choices, we examine ethics in relation to the ambiguous, unpredictable, and subjective contexts of managerial action. Furthermore, we examine how discursively constituted practice relates to managerial subjectivity and the possibilities of managers being moral agents. The article concludes by discussing how the ,ethics as practice' approach that we expound provides theoretical resources for studying the different ways that ethics manifest themselves in organizations as well as providing a practical application of ethics in organizations that goes beyond moralistic and legalistic approaches. [source]


Management and Business Ethics: A Critique and Integration of Ethical Decision-making Models

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2003
Dean Bartlett
This paper critically reviews the literature relating to the management of ethics within organizations and identifies, in line with other authors, a gap between theory and practice in the area. It highlights the role of management (both as an academic discipline and from a practitioner perspective) in bridging this gap and views managers, with their sense of individual ethical agency, as a key locus of ethics within organizations. The paper aims to address the theory,practice gap by surveying the business ethics literature in order to identify, draw together and integrate existing theory and research, with a particular emphasis upon models of ethical decision-making and their relationship to work values. Such an endeavour is necessary, not only because of the relative neglect of management practice by business ethics researchers, but also because of the current lack of integration in the field of business ethics itself. The paper outlines some of the main methodological challenges in the area and suggests how some of these may be overcome. Finally, it concludes with a number of suggestions as to how the theory,practice gap can be addressed through the development of a research agenda, based upon the previous work reviewed. [source]


Business Ethics and Business History: Neglected Dimensions in Management Education

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2002
R. Warren
This article highlights two large gaps in the business school curriculum: the neglect of historical and ethical dimensions. An overview is provided of progress made so far in the UK in the evolution of business history as an academic discipline; and also of the take,up of business ethics in university teaching. Both have had some success, but overall the response to these areas has been somewhat lacklustre , at least in the UK. A justification is provided for adding both components to a fully relevant business education. When the two are combined, the result can be a highly rewarding combination that provides insights that may not be possible for management writers, who work only in the present. Corporate ethics, the social responsibility of companies, disclosure, the environment, the actions of multinational companies overseas, the dilemmas of whistle,blowing, the impact of lobby groups and health and safety issues can all be understood more fully by students if they approach these subjects from an ethical and historical standpoint. [source]


On the Harmony of Feminist Ethics and Business Ethics

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 4 2007
JANET L. BORGERSON
First page of article [source]


Integrating Business Ethics and Compliance Programs: A Study of Ethics Officers in Leading Organizations

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 3 2002
Joshua Joseph
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Ties that Bind: ISCT As a Procedural Approach to Business Ethics

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 4 2000
Steven R. Salbu
[source]


Practising Applied Ethics with philosophical integrity: the case of Business Ethics

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 2 2008
Deon Rossouw
The unprecedented growth and demand for Applied Ethics (Business Ethics, Medical Ethics, Information Ethics, Engineering Ethics, etc.) since the last quarter of the previous century, has opened up a range of new opportunities for the discipline of Philosophy. While these new opportunities have been enthusiastically seized upon by some philosophers, others have frowned upon them or rejected them outright. In order to make sense of this demand for Applied Ethics training, I will first explore in general why this demand for Applied Ethics developed. I will then use the example of Business Ethics to demonstrate and discuss some of the suspicions contemplated by philosophers who regard Applied Ethics as a dangerous and deceitful temptation that potentially can corrupt Philosophy, and that philosophers should at best avoid or at least be very careful of. I will assess the legitimacy and seriousness of these concerns and objections with regard to Business Ethics and then outline an Aristotelian approach to Business Ethics that I believe can be practised with philosophical integrity. [source]


Special Issue of Business Ethics: A European Review ,Sustaining competences for corporate social responsibility: a sensemaking perspective'

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 1 2005
Article first published online: 21 APR 200
No abstract is available for this article. [source]


Business ethics and existentialism

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 3 2006
Ian Ashman
First page of article [source]


Business ethics as academic field in Africa: its current status

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 4 2000
Belinda Barkhuysen
Reflection on the state of business ethics as academic field in Africa has been largely neglected, partly because there existed no overall picture of what is happening in this field of study. This paper reports the findings of the first comprehensive survey on the state of business ethics as academic field on the African continent. It has both a descriptive and reflective component. In the descriptive part of the paper the research strategy and methodology used to conduct this survey is outlined as well as the difficulties encountered in the research project. Then the findings with regard to how academics perceived the purpose of this field of study, what academic activity there is within this field, where it is being done, and how it is institutionalised are reported. In the reflective part of the paper, the implications of these findings are considered and some directives for the further development of business ethics as academic field are proposed. [source]


Corporate Governance and Business Ethics: insights from the strategic planning experience*

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE, Issue 6 2005
Ingrid Bonn
In this paper we develop an integrated approach towards corporate governance and business ethics. Our central argument is that organisations can learn from the development of strategic planning in the 1970s and 1980s. We identify three weaknesses , a bureaucratic and formalised approach, lack of implementation and lack of integration throughout the organisation , which were prevalent in strategic planning in the past and which are potentially just as problematic for an integrated corporate governance approach to business ethics. We suggest ways these weaknesses might be avoided and provide questions for boards of directors to consider when integrating ethical concerns into their organisations' corporate governance structures. [source]


What's wrong with business ethics

INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL SCIENCE JOURNAL, Issue 185 2005
David Rodin
The field of business ethics is trapped between two competing and flawed conceptions of corporate responsibility. On the one hand is the shareholder value model, championed by Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman, which claims that corporations owe positive moral obligations only to their shareholders. On the other hand is the normative stakeholder theory, which claims that corporations are morally obliged to secure the interests of a broad range of groups, of which shareholders are only one. In this paper I will argue that if it is to generate a viable account of corporate moral responsibility, business ethics will need to abandon both canonical approaches and adopt a new approach based on a more concrete conception of the business corporation. At the end of the paper I sketch what such a theoretical approach would look like. The argument is not only relevant to business ethics; it also has important consequences for Michael Porter's influential approach to competitive strategy. [source]


The sleeping giant hypocrisy

JOURNAL OF CORPORATE ACCOUNTING & FINANCE, Issue 5 2010
Robert W. Rouse
In a sharply worded commentary, our SEC columnist declares that it's time to stop pretending that what now passes as "business ethics" will save us from ourselves. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


An ethical judgment framework for corporate political actions

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, Issue 3 2008
Yongqiang Gao
Despite the popularity of businesses' involvement in politics, little discussion has been conducted on the ethics of corporate political actions (CPAs) in the business, corporate social responsibility, business ethics and ,business and society' literatures. The sporadic studies on ethics of CPA mainly focus on one or two aspects of the CPA in judging its ethics, such as its goal or means or consequences, very little has been done in a systematic way to analyse and articulate ethical standards for those corporations and industries who proactively seek to influence government officials. This study attempts to make up this gap. By applying three basic ethical principles including Utilitarian theory, theory of rights and theory of justice into the CPAs, I propose an ethical judgment framework for CPAs. The ethical judgment framework focuses on and judged by four issues/attributes of a CPA, including the goals/purposes of the CPA, the means taken to achieve the goals, the consequences resulted from the CPA, and the process of the CPA. The ,means' and ,consequences' are the core criteria in the framework, but ,goals' and ,process' also contribute to the ethical judgment of a CPA. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. [source]


The five capabilities of socially responsible companies

JOURNAL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS, Issue 2 2004
Leeora D. Black
Abstract This paper develops and tests a model that integrates processes of public affairs management with stakeholder engagement and dialogue, business ethics and social reporting to explain social responsibility capabilities in organisations. The model, called Corporate Social Responsibility Management Capacity, describes social responsiveness as arising from a firm's social responsibility orientation and its public relations orientation. The paper shows how the model can be used by managers to measure, manage and improve their company's ability to be socially responsible. Copyright © 2004 Henry Stewart Publications [source]


Ethical Attitudes in Small Businesses and Large Corporations: Theory and Empirical Findings from a Tracking Study Spanning Three Decades

JOURNAL OF SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2006
Justin G. Longenecker
This study offers a theoretical framework of ethical behavior and a comparative analysis of ethical perceptions of managers of large, mostly publicly traded corporations (those with 1,000 or more employees) and the owners and managers of smaller companies (those with fewer than 100 employees) across 17 years. The primary research provides basic data on the changing standards of ethics as perceived by leaders of large and small businesses where the cultures frequently fall into sharp contrast. Our findings reveal the extent to which the message of business integrity is gaining or losing ground within large and small companies. It does this by means of respondents' judgments of acceptable responses to 16 scenarios profiling common business situations with questionable ethical dimensions. Based on responses from over 5,000 managers and employees (from firms of all sizes) to our scenarios at three points in time (1985, 1993, 2001), we tested two research questions. First, for firms of all sizes, have business ethics improved or declined between the years 1985 and 2001? Second, comparing responses of large and small firm executives across the 1985,2001 time frame, is there a discernible difference in their ethical standards? Our results suggest that business leaders are making somewhat more ethical decisions in recent years. We also found that small business owner,managers offered less ethical responses to scenarios in 1993 but that no significant differences existed with large firm managers in 1985 and 2001. Implications of our findings are discussed. [source]


Determinants of fraud losses in nonprofit organizations

NONPROFIT MANAGEMENT & LEADERSHIP, Issue 1 2008
Kristy Holtfreter
Although fraud research has increased, the nonprofit setting has been ignored in criminology and business ethics. This exploratory study examines occupational fraud in 128 nonprofit agencies. Characteristics of offenders (age, gender, educational background, position in the agency), victims (size of organization and available control mechanisms), and offenses are compared to previous research. Regression analyses indicate that several factors are significant predictors of financial loss. At the individual level, it appears females are responsible for increased dollar losses; however, subsequent analyses demonstrate that organizations with a higher level of internal controls detect fraud committed by males, and it is these offenses that result in more serious losses. [source]


HOW TO RECTIFY UNFAIR TRADE PRACTICES AND TO ESTABLISH APPROPRIATE SUPPLY CHAINS AND BETTER BUSINESS CULTURE UNDER THE GLOBAL MARKET ECONOMY

PACIFIC ECONOMIC REVIEW, Issue 5 2009
Tsugio Ide
Banning unfair trade practices stands alongside private monopolization and the unjust restraint of trade as a key theme in competition policy. However, it poses much greater difficulties to deal with the matter than either private monopolization or unjust restraint of trade. In recent years, ongoing economic globalization, advances in information communication technology and other factors have wrought major changes in the traditional supply chain: for example, in subcontracting structure. Given the role of small and medium enterprises in underpinning economic growth, lifting the basic quality and performance level of these firms and improving business conditions for them have emerged as key policy themes. New efforts are needed to establish fair trade as a business practice and to create a new business culture in corporation with competition policy, small and medium enterprise policy and business ethics, such as Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) practices. [source]


Business Ethics as Practice

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 2 2007
Stewart Clegg
In this article we develop a conceptualization of business ethics as practice. Starting from the view that the ethics that organizations display in practice will have been forged through an ongoing process of debate and contestation over moral choices, we examine ethics in relation to the ambiguous, unpredictable, and subjective contexts of managerial action. Furthermore, we examine how discursively constituted practice relates to managerial subjectivity and the possibilities of managers being moral agents. The article concludes by discussing how the ,ethics as practice' approach that we expound provides theoretical resources for studying the different ways that ethics manifest themselves in organizations as well as providing a practical application of ethics in organizations that goes beyond moralistic and legalistic approaches. [source]


Management and Business Ethics: A Critique and Integration of Ethical Decision-making Models

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2003
Dean Bartlett
This paper critically reviews the literature relating to the management of ethics within organizations and identifies, in line with other authors, a gap between theory and practice in the area. It highlights the role of management (both as an academic discipline and from a practitioner perspective) in bridging this gap and views managers, with their sense of individual ethical agency, as a key locus of ethics within organizations. The paper aims to address the theory,practice gap by surveying the business ethics literature in order to identify, draw together and integrate existing theory and research, with a particular emphasis upon models of ethical decision-making and their relationship to work values. Such an endeavour is necessary, not only because of the relative neglect of management practice by business ethics researchers, but also because of the current lack of integration in the field of business ethics itself. The paper outlines some of the main methodological challenges in the area and suggests how some of these may be overcome. Finally, it concludes with a number of suggestions as to how the theory,practice gap can be addressed through the development of a research agenda, based upon the previous work reviewed. [source]


Business Ethics and Business History: Neglected Dimensions in Management Education

BRITISH JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT, Issue 3 2002
R. Warren
This article highlights two large gaps in the business school curriculum: the neglect of historical and ethical dimensions. An overview is provided of progress made so far in the UK in the evolution of business history as an academic discipline; and also of the take,up of business ethics in university teaching. Both have had some success, but overall the response to these areas has been somewhat lacklustre , at least in the UK. A justification is provided for adding both components to a fully relevant business education. When the two are combined, the result can be a highly rewarding combination that provides insights that may not be possible for management writers, who work only in the present. Corporate ethics, the social responsibility of companies, disclosure, the environment, the actions of multinational companies overseas, the dilemmas of whistle,blowing, the impact of lobby groups and health and safety issues can all be understood more fully by students if they approach these subjects from an ethical and historical standpoint. [source]


Dignity in Western Versus in Chinese Cultures: Theoretical Overview and Practical Illustrations

BUSINESS AND SOCIETY REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
DARYL KOEHN
ABSTRACT Dignity is an important concept in ethics. Human rights organizations justify rights by appealing to human dignity. Prominent politicians have cited the need to protect human dignity and urged the founding of international institutions. The concept of human dignity is often used to evaluate and critique the ethics of select practices. In addition, the idea of dignity is used as a universal principle to ground universalist business ethics. This paper argues that there are substantial differences between the ways in which the West and China construe human dignity. Having documented these major differences, we consider two cases to show how the differences might "cash out" in actual business practice. Instead of relying upon a nonexistent universal concept of human dignity, we suggest that it is respectful and sound to seek to identify the many goods (teamwork, initiative, autonomy, respect for elders) that differing parties see at play in the case at hand and then to try to come up with ways to realize as many of these goods as possible. [source]


Editorial introduction: Derrida, business, ethics

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 3 2010
Campbell Jones
This special issue contains papers first presented at a conference that was held 14,16 May 2008 at the Centre for Philosophy and Political Economy at the University of Leicester. Each of the papers takes up ideas from the works of Jacques Derrida and seeks to apply these to questions of business, ethics and business ethics. The papers take up quite different parts of Derrida's works, from his work on the animal, narrative and story, the violence of codification and the limits of responsibility to the aporias of decision. As a whole, the papers offer a dangerous gift to business ethics, of which the stakes are here laid bare , if business ethics is to shrug off its philosophical immaturity and take seriously the work of major European thinkers such as Derrida, then many of its assumed categories, concepts and practices will be shown to shudder and tremble, as it becomes possible to demonstrate how they, one by one, unhinge themselves. [source]


Resituating narrative and story in business ethics

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 3 2010
Kenneth Mølbjerg Jørgensen
In this article, we resituate a long-standing duality of (Western) narrative tradition over living story emergence and more linear narrative. Narrative, with its focus on linear beginning, middle and end coherence, retrospection and monologic, is too easily appropriated into managerialist projects. We focus on the web of living stories as a Derridian deconstructive move, which allows us to say something important about their relation to narrative and to develop a storytelling ethics. Our thesis is that resituating the relationship between narrative and living story invites exploration of the plurality of narratives that treat living stories as supplementary. We claim that this deconstructive move allows us to rethink politics and ethics anew. Storytelling ethics opens new spaces for marginalized other(s) voices and creates an awareness of our complicity and responsibility for others. Further, storytelling ethics allows for a more nuanced and varied understanding of business ethics and its inherent exclusionary truth and morality claims and paves the way for a more reflexive ethics. [source]


Rorty, Caputo and business ethics without metaphysics: ethical theories as normative narratives

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 2 2010
Andrew Gustafson
Using the works of Richard Rorty and John Caputo, I want to suggest that we might be better off treating the traditional ethical theories of Kant, Mill, Aristotle and Hobbes as normative narratives rather than as justificatory schemes for moral decision making to be set up against one another. In a spirit akin to Husserl's ,bracketing' of metaphysics, when discussing ethical theories in business ethics, we can easily avoid metaphysics and use an approach that sees ethical theory as socially convincing normative narratives , narratives that unify us with others insofar as they describe our phenomenological experiences in a way with which many of us mutually resonate. I will do this by attempting to show how John Caputo's thinking in Against Ethics and Rorty's postmodern pragmatism might be appropriated to some extent by us in business ethics. [source]


Distinctions in descriptive and instrumental stakeholder theory: a challenge for empirical research

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 1 2010
Niklas Egels-Zandén
Stakeholder theory is one of the most influential theories in business ethics. It is perhaps not surprising that a theory as popular as stakeholder theory should be used in different ways, but when the disparity between different uses becomes too great, it is questionable whether all the ,stakeholder research' refers to the same underlying theory. This paper starts to clarify this definitional confusion by distinguishing between three different ways in which different lines of stakeholder research are connected with descriptive and instrumental stakeholder theory. First, a distinction is made between research connected with descriptive and with instrumental stakeholder theory as defined by Donaldson & Preston in the narrow or broad sense. Second, a distinction is made between research that interprets descriptive and instrumental stakeholder theories as either hypotheses or research areas. Third, a distinction is made between research that interprets Donaldson & Preston's central concept of ,stakeholder management' as either behaviour or rationale. Finally, the paper discusses the implications of these differences for empirical research into stakeholder theory. [source]


Promoting ethical reflection in the teaching of business ethics

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 4 2008
Howard Harris
A case study provides the basis for consideration of the purpose of business ethics teaching, the importance of reflection and the evaluation of ethics teaching. The way in which personal reflection and an increased capacity for ethical action can be encouraged and openly identified as aims of the course is discussed. The paper considers changes in the design and delivery of the international management ethics and values course taught at the University of South Australia as part of the undergraduate management degree in Australia, Singapore and Hong Kong. As a result of student and teaching staff responses, and course evaluations, the course design, teaching and assessment has moved steadily toward an aim which explicitly refers to behaviour, without losing the significant conceptual base. Ways in which opportunities can be provided to enhance the development of a reflective capability are considered, including narrative, role models, ethical reflection, journal-keeping and practice. The changes required a change in assessment practice. The difficulties of assessing intention and commitment to ethical action, whether in an individual course or across the curriculum, are discussed. [source]


Has the guest arrived yet?

BUSINESS ETHICS: A EUROPEAN REVIEW, Issue 3 2007
Emmanuel Levinas, a stranger in business ethics
To what extent can business ethics be ,hospitable' to Levinasian ethics? This paper raises questions about how business ethics relates to its guests, in this case the guest called ,Levinas'; the idea of introducing or inviting the work of an author into a field, as its guest, is by no means a simple problem of transference. For Jacques Derrida, there is hospitality only when the stranger's introduction to our home is totally unconditional. Such a conceptualisation of hospitality becomes even more demanding when the ,stranger' that is near our ,home' is an ethics also demanding hospitality, such as the ethics proposed by Levinas. An invitation puts in place particular circumstances that allow only for an arrival of the one invited. These conditions precede the so-called stranger, thereby predetermining the route to be taken, the destination to be reached and the correct manner of self-presentation. An invitation already reduces the Other to that which is expected by the inviter, that is to the Same. The hospitality of the field of business ethics becomes an endorsement of a particular version of the stranger, therefore recognisable by the field. Perhaps conceptualising Levinasian ethics as an ethics that cannot be invited might protect it from procedures that reduce the ,strangeness' of the stranger, making it knowable. That is the argument presented in this paper. [source]