Bullying Behavior (bullying + behavior)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Cyber Bullying Behaviors Among Middle and High School Students

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 3 2010
Faye Mishna
Little research has been conducted that comprehensively examines cyber bullying with a large and diverse sample. The present study examines the prevalence, impact, and differential experience of cyber bullying among a large and diverse sample of middle and high school students (N = 2,186) from a large urban center. The survey examined technology use, cyber bullying behaviors, and the psychosocial impact of bullying and being bullied. About half (49.5%) of students indicated they had been bullied online and 33.7% indicated they had bullied others online. Most bullying was perpetrated by and to friends and participants generally did not tell anyone about the bullying. Participants reported feeling angry, sad, and depressed after being bullied online. Participants bullied others online because it made them feel as though they were funny, popular, and powerful, although many indicated feeling guilty afterward. Greater attention is required to understand and reduce cyber bullying within children's social worlds and with the support of educators and parents. [source]


The relationship between self-perception of physical attractiveness and sexual bullying in early adolescence

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 5 2010
Nancy J. Cunningham
Abstract The relationship between self-perception of physical attractiveness and four measures of sexual bullying behavior (victimization, perpetration, having friends who sexually bully, and observation of sexual bullying among peers at school) was examined in a sample of 396 middle school age students. Students who perceived themselves to be more physically attractive than their peers reported sexually bullying others more, being sexually bullied by others more, observing more sexual bullying, and having more friends who sexually bully others than did students who perceived themselves as average looking. In addition, males who perceived themselves to be less physically attractive than their peers reported being victimized more and reported observing more sexual bullying in the school environment. These findings highlight the importance of physical attractiveness in the early initiation of sexual harassment. Implications for future research and interventions with early adolescents are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 36:271,281, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Do personality characteristics and beliefs predict intra-group bullying between prisoners?

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 4 2010
Polly Turner
Abstract This study assesses how beliefs about aggression and personality can predict engagement in intra-group bullying among prisoners. A sample of 213 adult male prisoners completed the DIPC-SCALED (bullying behavior), the EXPAGG (beliefs toward aggression), and the IPIP (a five-factor measure of personality). It was predicted that bullies would hold greater instrumental beliefs supporting the use of aggression than the other categories, with perpetrators reporting lower scores on agreeableness, conscientiousness, and openness to experience, and higher scores on neuroticism (i.e. low scores on emotional stability) than the remaining sample. Bullies and bully-victims endorsed greater instrumental aggressive beliefs than the victim category. Only one perpetrator group, bullies were predicted by reduced levels of agreeableness and increased levels of neuroticism, whereas bully/victims were predicted by decreased levels of neuroticism. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are discussed. Aggr. Behav. 36:261,270, 2010. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Does cost,benefit analysis or self-control predict involvement in bullying behavior by male prisoners?

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 1 2009
John Archer
Abstract The main aim of this study is to assess whether lack of self-control or the perceived costs and benefits of aggression provide the better predictors of bullying behavior and victimization, and direct aggression perpetration, in a sample of 122 male British prisoners. We also assessed whether bullying was associated with height and weight. Zero-order correlations showed that perceived benefits, self-control, and perceived costs were most closely associated with perpetration of bullying, and that lack of self-control was weakly associated with victimization. Height and weight were unrelated to bullying or victimization. In a standard regression analyses, perceived benefits was the strongest predictor of bullying perpetration, with lack of self-control contributing further; all three variables made a significant contribution when direct aggression was the criterion. Mediation analysis showed that a combined cost,benefit measure partially mediated the association between self-control and both bullying and direct aggression. The findings are discussed in relation to explanations of aggression based on impulse control or a cost,benefit analysis. Aggr. Behav. 35:31,40, 2009. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Empirical test of bullies' status goals: assessing direct goals, aggression, and prestige

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 1 2009
Jelle J. Sijtsema
Abstract The literature suggests that status goals are one of the driving motivations behind bullying behavior, yet this conjecture has rarely if ever been examined empirically. This study assessed status goals in three ways, using dyadic network analysis to analyze the relations and goals among 10,11 and 14,15 year olds in 22 school classes (N boys=225; N girls=277). As a validation bullies were contrasted with victims. Bullies had direct status goals (measured with the Interpersonal Goal Inventory for Children) and showed dominance as measured with proactive aggression. Moreover, as predicted from a goal perspective, bullying behavior was related to prestige in terms of perceived popularity. In contrast, victims lacked status goals, were only reactively aggressive, and low on prestige. That being popular is not the same as being liked could be shown by the fact that bullies were just as rejected as victims by their classmates. Eighth-grade bullies had more direct status goals than fourth-grade bullies, possibly indicating that striving for the popularity component of status increases in early adolescence. Aggr. Behav. 35:57,67, 2009. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Characteristics of male and female prisoners involved in bullying behavior

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 3 2007
Jane L. Ireland
This study explores bullying behavior in a larger and more representative sample than previous prison-based research. It has two core aims, first to explore the nature of bullying in relation to indirect and direct aggression and, second, to explore the predictors of bully-category membership with particular reference to behavioral characteristics. Participants were adult men (n=728) and women (n=525) prisoners. All completed a behavioral measure of behavior indicative of bullying (Direct and Indirect Prisoner behavior Checklist, DIPC) that also explored prison-based behavior such as negative acts towards staff or prison rules, positive acts and drug-related behavior. Indirect aggression was, as predicted, reported more frequently than direct aggression, although this only held for perpetration. Bully-victims, as predicted, showed more negative behavior. Pure bullies and pure victims also showed more negative behavior than the other categories. The findings are discussed in relation to the environment in which bullying behavior is being assessed and with attention to the possible motivations underlying both bullying and negative behavior. Directions for future research are suggested. Aggr. Behav. 33:1,10, 2007. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Association between measures of aggression and bullying among juvenile and young offenders

AGGRESSIVE BEHAVIOR, Issue 1 2004
Jane L. Ireland
Abstract This study addresses the relationship between aggression and behaviors indicative of bullying in a sample of incarcerated male juvenile and young offenders. The study also addresses whether or not offenders who bully others and/or are bullied themselves can be identified by the type of aggression that they report. Ninety-five juvenile and 196 young offenders completed a self-report behavioral checklist (DIPC: Direct and Indirect Prisoner Behavior Checklist) that addressed their experience of and involvement in behaviors indicative of bullying. They also completed the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ), a measure of physical and verbal aggression, anger and hostility. Four categories of offenders were identified from the DIPC - pure bullies, pure victims, those who were both bullies and victims (bully/victims), and those not-involved in bullying behavior. As predicted, behaviors measured on the DIPC that were indicative of ,bullying others' correlated positively with scores on the AQ. There was no indication, however, that physical AQ and physical bullying on the DIPC were the same constructs. There was a closer association between verbal AQ scores and verbal bullying on the DIPC. Bullies and bully/victims reported higher levels of physical and verbal aggression, and bully/victims reported higher levels of hostility and anger, than the other categories. It is concluded that although there are similarities between the AQ and the DIPC, there is no evidence that they are measuring the same type of aggression, although different groups involved in bullying can be partly distinguished by their scores on the AQ. Aggr. Behav. 30:29,42, 2004. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


Peer victimization in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

PSYCHOLOGY IN THE SCHOOLS, Issue 2 2009
Judith Wiener
This study explored peer victimization in 9- to 14-year-old children with and without Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The sample comprised 104 children, 52 of whom had a previous ADHD diagnosis. Children with ADHD had higher overall rates of self-reported victimization by peers and parent- and teacher-reported bullying behavior than did children without ADHD. The rates of victimization were especially high for girls with ADHD. Furthermore, children with ADHD reported higher frequencies of verbal, physical, and relational victimization than did children without ADHD. When data were pooled from children, parents, and teachers, children with ADHD were categorized as victims, bullies, and bully/victims significantly more often than were children without ADHD. Parent ratings of ADHD symptoms predicted self-reported victimization by peers. Neither parent-rated anxious-shy behaviors nor parent- and teacher-rated social skills predicted victimization by peers over and above ADHD symptoms. Parent ratings of oppositional behavior mediated the relationship between ADHD symptoms and parent- and teacher-rated bullying. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


Incivility and Bullying in the Workplace and Nurses' Shame Responses

JOURNAL OF OBSTETRIC, GYNECOLOGIC & NEONATAL NURSING, Issue 2 2008
Dianne M. Felblinger
ABSTRACT Incivility and bullying in the workplace are intimidating forces that result in shame responses and threaten the well-being of nurses. Some nurses are accustomed to tolerating behaviors that are outside the realm of considerate conduct and are unaware that they are doing so. These behaviors affect the organizational climate, and their negative effects multiply if left unchecked. Interventions for incivility and bullying behaviors are needed at both individual and administrative levels. [source]


Statistical analysis of friendship patterns and bullying behaviors among youth

NEW DIRECTIONS FOR CHILD & ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT, Issue 118 2007
Dorothy L. Espelage
The authors use p* modeling to explore connections between network structures and social influence in a seventh-grade friendship network. Specifically, p* parameters reveal how bullying perpetration, dyads, triads, and more complex group structures contribute to network formation, providing fine-level detail about the operation of internal peer group structures. [source]


Cyber Bullying Behaviors Among Middle and High School Students

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF ORTHOPSYCHIATRY, Issue 3 2010
Faye Mishna
Little research has been conducted that comprehensively examines cyber bullying with a large and diverse sample. The present study examines the prevalence, impact, and differential experience of cyber bullying among a large and diverse sample of middle and high school students (N = 2,186) from a large urban center. The survey examined technology use, cyber bullying behaviors, and the psychosocial impact of bullying and being bullied. About half (49.5%) of students indicated they had been bullied online and 33.7% indicated they had bullied others online. Most bullying was perpetrated by and to friends and participants generally did not tell anyone about the bullying. Participants reported feeling angry, sad, and depressed after being bullied online. Participants bullied others online because it made them feel as though they were funny, popular, and powerful, although many indicated feeling guilty afterward. Greater attention is required to understand and reduce cyber bullying within children's social worlds and with the support of educators and parents. [source]