Breeding Structure (breeding + structure)

Distribution by Scientific Domains


Selected Abstracts


Breeding structure of an isolated cactophilic Drosophila population on a sandstone table hill

JOURNAL OF ZOOLOGICAL SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTIONARY RESEARCH, Issue 3 2002
E. M. Moraes
Abstract The effect of host cacti on the breeding structure of an isolated population of cactophilic Drosophila gouveai was studied. A comparison was made, using F statistics, of the allozyme frequencies at 11 loci among temporal samples of the adult population and six samples of progeny obtained from individual rotting cactus cladodes. The population appears to be structured by the cacti, forming breeding groups, and approximately four individuals contribute gametes to the progeny of each cladode. This D. gouveai population had a low degree of heterozygosity, compared with mean values for most Drosophila species, however it was within the range of values reported for other cactophilic Drosophila. Zusammenfassung Ziel der Untersuchung der Paarungsstruktur einer isolierten Population der kaktophilen Spezies Drosophila gouveai war die Bestimmung des Strukturniveaus in Abhängigkeit von den jeweiligen Wirtskakteen. Vergleiche der Allozymfrequenzen wurden mittels F-Statistik an elf Loci der Gesamptpopulation durchgeführt, von der zu verschiedenen Zeitpunkten Proben genommen wurden, und an sechs Loci der Nachwuchsgenerationen, die sich in isolierten, verrottenden Kakteenkladodien entwickelten. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass die Populationin Bezug auf die Kakteen in Form von Paarungsgruppen strukturiert ist, und dass zum Nachwuchs innerhalb einzelner Kladodien jeweils circa vier Individuen Gameten beitragen. Die geschätzten Heterozygotiegrade wurden mit bereits publizierten Werten anderer kaktophiler und mit nicht-kaktophilen Drosophila -Arten verglichen. Dieser Vergleich zeigte, dass der niedrige Heterozygotiegrad der D.gouveai Population mit den Werten anderer kaktophiler Arten übereinstimmt. [source]


The purge of genetic load through restricted panmixia in a Drosophila experiment

JOURNAL OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY, Issue 9 2010
V. ÁVILA
Abstract Using Drosophila melanogaster, we explore the consequences of restricted panmixia (RP) on the genetic load caused by segregating deleterious recessive alleles in a population where females mate a full sib with probability about ½ and mate randomly otherwise. We find that this breeding structure purges roughly half the load concealed in heterozygous condition. Furthermore, fitness did not increase after panmixia was restored, implying that, during RP, the excess of expressed load induced by inbreeding had also been efficiently purged. We find evidences for adaptation to laboratory conditions and to specific selective pressures imposed by the RP protocol. We discuss some of the consequences of these results, both for the evolution of population breeding structures and for the design of conservation programmes. [source]


Characterization of polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner)

MOLECULAR ECOLOGY RESOURCES, Issue 2 2005
TONY GRACE
Abstract The Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Hübner), is a serious and widespread pest of stored food commodities worldwide. Studies on the population genetics and breeding structure of P. interpunctella are lacking. Understanding the breeding structure of this pest has implications for its management. Fifteen microsatellite loci were isolated, cloned and characterized using an enrichment method. Forty individuals from six subpopulations were tested for polymorphism. Nine loci were found to be polymorphic. The number of alleles varied from three to six per locus. [source]


The purge of genetic load through restricted panmixia in a Drosophila experiment

JOURNAL OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY, Issue 9 2010
V. ÁVILA
Abstract Using Drosophila melanogaster, we explore the consequences of restricted panmixia (RP) on the genetic load caused by segregating deleterious recessive alleles in a population where females mate a full sib with probability about ½ and mate randomly otherwise. We find that this breeding structure purges roughly half the load concealed in heterozygous condition. Furthermore, fitness did not increase after panmixia was restored, implying that, during RP, the excess of expressed load induced by inbreeding had also been efficiently purged. We find evidences for adaptation to laboratory conditions and to specific selective pressures imposed by the RP protocol. We discuss some of the consequences of these results, both for the evolution of population breeding structures and for the design of conservation programmes. [source]