Body Vibration (body + vibration)

Distribution by Scientific Domains

Kinds of Body Vibration

  • whole body vibration


  • Selected Abstracts


    Effect of 8-Month Vertical Whole Body Vibration on Bone, Muscle Performance, and Body Balance: A Randomized Controlled Study,

    JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH, Issue 5 2003
    Saila Torvinen MD
    Abstract Recent animal studies have given evidence that vibration loading may be an efficient and safe way to improve mass and mechanical competence of bone, thus providing great potential for preventing and treating osteoporosis. Randomized controlled trials on the safety and efficacy of the vibration on human skeleton are, however, lacking. This randomized controlled intervention trial was designed to assess the effects of an 8-month whole body vibration intervention on bone, muscular performance, and body balance in young and healthy adults. Fifty-six volunteers (21 men and 35 women; age, 19-38 years) were randomly assigned to the vibration group or control group. The vibration intervention consisted of an 8-month whole body vibration (4 min/day, 3-5 times per week). During the 4-minute vibration program, the platform oscillated in an ascending order from 25 to 45 Hz, corresponding to estimated maximum vertical accelerations from 2g to 8g. Mass, structure, and estimated strength of bone at the distal tibia and tibial shaft were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at baseline and at 8 months. Bone mineral content was measured at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter, calcaneus, and distal radius using DXA at baseline and after the 8-month intervention. Serum markers of bone turnover were determined at baseline and 3, 6, and 8 months. Five performance tests (vertical jump, isometric extension strength of the lower extremities, grip strength, shuttle run, and postural sway) were performed at baseline and after the 8-month intervention. The 8-month vibration intervention succeeded well and was safe to perform but had no effect on mass, structure, or estimated strength of bone at any skeletal site. Serum markers of bone turnover did not change during the vibration intervention. However, at 8 months, a 7.8% net benefit in the vertical jump height was observed in the vibration group (95% CI, 2.8-13.1%; p = 0.003). On the other performance and balance tests, the vibration intervention had no effect. In conclusion, the studied whole body vibration program had no effect on bones of young, healthy adults, but instead, increased vertical jump height. Future human studies are needed before clinical recommendations for vibration exercise. [source]


    Effect of whole body vibration in Parkinson's disease: A controlled study,

    MOVEMENT DISORDERS, Issue 6 2009
    Pablo Arias PhD
    Abstract In the search of new strategies to improve the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients, recent work has reported an amelioration of Parkinsonian symptoms using Whole Body Vibration (WBV). A double-blinded, placebo controlled design was used to evaluate the effect of a 12 WBV sessions-programme on a number of motor and clinical tests in 23 Parkinson's disease patients. Patients were assigned to one of two groups, one receiving WBV and the other a placebo group. At the end of the programme as well as during intra-session evaluation, there was no difference between the experimental (vibration) and placebo groups in any outcomes. These results suggest that reported benefits of vibration are due to a placebo response. 2009 Movement Disorder Society [source]


    Effect of forklift operation on lower back pain: An evidence-based approach

    HUMAN FACTORS AND ERGONOMICS IN MANUFACTURING & SERVICE INDUSTRIES, Issue 2 2008
    Heriberto Barriera Viruet
    Most studies on the occupational hazards associated with forklift operation have examined risks of fatalities and traumatic injuries. Few studies have examined the magnitude of risk of lower back pain. This research deals with an evidence-based approach designed to examine if there is a relationship between whole-body vibration and driver postures with lower back pain among forklift operators and to offer some recommendations to minimize the risk of lower back pain. To accomplish the study goal, an evidence-based approach was adopted from evidence-based medicine. The basic steps of this evidence-based approach were: (1) formulation of a clear research question from a worker-occupational problem; (2) search of the literature for the best evidence with which to answer the question; (3) critically appraise the evidence; and (4) implement useful findings in occupational health and safety practices. In addition, the metarelative risk was calculated and the biological plausibility between whole body vibration (WBV) and operator posture with lower back pain was investigated. Six observational articles satisfied the inclusion criteria adopted in this research. The methodological qualities of the published studies ranged from marginal to average. The metarelative risk was 2.1, indicating that operators exposed to driving forklifts are greater than twice the risk of those not exposed to driving forklifts to experience lower back pain. There are biological mechanisms by which WBV and operator postures could develop lower back pain. Some aspects of the work environment that influenced vibration are seat, speed, track, and tires. Awkward postures and static postures are affected by cab design, seat, time spent seated, and the task performed. It appears that there is a causal relationship between forklift operation and lower back pain. The evidence examined shows a strong association and consistency between all studies and this relationship is biologically plausible. It is recommended that intervention studies be conducted to determine the effectiveness of ergonomic controls. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. [source]


    Effect of 6-Month Whole Body Vibration Training on Hip Density, Muscle Strength, and Postural Control in Postmenopausal Women: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study,

    JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH, Issue 3 2004
    Sabine MP Verschueren
    Abstract High-frequency mechanical strain seems to stimulate bone strength in animals. In this randomized controlled trial, hip BMD was measured in postmenopausal women after a 24-week whole body vibration (WBV) training program. Vibration training significantly increased BMD of the hip. These findings suggest that WBV training might be useful in the prevention of osteoporosis. Introduction: High-frequency mechanical strain has been shown to stimulate bone strength in different animal models. However, the effects of vibration exercise on the human skeleton have rarely been studied. Particularly in postmenopausal women,who are most at risk of developing osteoporosis,randomized controlled data on the safety and efficacy of vibration loading are lacking. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess the musculoskeletal effects of high-frequency loading by means of whole body vibration (WBV) in postmenopausal women. Materials and Methods: Seventy volunteers (age, 58,74 years) were randomly assigned to a whole body vibration training group (WBV, n = 25), a resistance training group (RES, n = 22), or a control group (CON, n = 23). The WBV group and the RES group trained three times weekly for 24 weeks. The WBV group performed static and dynamic knee-extensor exercises on a vibration platform (35,40 Hz, 2.28,5.09g), which mechanically loaded the bone and evoked reflexive muscle contractions. The RES group trained knee extensors by dynamic leg press and leg extension exercises, increasing from low (20 RM) to high (8 RM) resistance. The CON group did not participate in any training. Hip bone density was measured using DXA at baseline and after the 6-month intervention. Isometric and dynamic strength were measured by means of a motor-driven dynamometer. Data were analyzed by means of repeated measures ANOVA. Results: No vibration-related side effects were observed. Vibration training improved isometric and dynamic muscle strength (+15% and + 16%, respectively; p < 0.01) and also significantly increased BMD of the hip (+0.93%, p < 0.05). No changes in hip BMD were observed in women participating in resistance training or age-matched controls (,0.60% and ,0.62%, respectively; not significant). Serum markers of bone turnover did not change in any of the groups. Conclusion: These findings suggest that WBV training may be a feasible and effective way to modify well-recognized risk factors for falls and fractures in older women and support the need for further human studies. [source]


    Effect of 8-Month Vertical Whole Body Vibration on Bone, Muscle Performance, and Body Balance: A Randomized Controlled Study,

    JOURNAL OF BONE AND MINERAL RESEARCH, Issue 5 2003
    Saila Torvinen MD
    Abstract Recent animal studies have given evidence that vibration loading may be an efficient and safe way to improve mass and mechanical competence of bone, thus providing great potential for preventing and treating osteoporosis. Randomized controlled trials on the safety and efficacy of the vibration on human skeleton are, however, lacking. This randomized controlled intervention trial was designed to assess the effects of an 8-month whole body vibration intervention on bone, muscular performance, and body balance in young and healthy adults. Fifty-six volunteers (21 men and 35 women; age, 19-38 years) were randomly assigned to the vibration group or control group. The vibration intervention consisted of an 8-month whole body vibration (4 min/day, 3-5 times per week). During the 4-minute vibration program, the platform oscillated in an ascending order from 25 to 45 Hz, corresponding to estimated maximum vertical accelerations from 2g to 8g. Mass, structure, and estimated strength of bone at the distal tibia and tibial shaft were assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at baseline and at 8 months. Bone mineral content was measured at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, trochanter, calcaneus, and distal radius using DXA at baseline and after the 8-month intervention. Serum markers of bone turnover were determined at baseline and 3, 6, and 8 months. Five performance tests (vertical jump, isometric extension strength of the lower extremities, grip strength, shuttle run, and postural sway) were performed at baseline and after the 8-month intervention. The 8-month vibration intervention succeeded well and was safe to perform but had no effect on mass, structure, or estimated strength of bone at any skeletal site. Serum markers of bone turnover did not change during the vibration intervention. However, at 8 months, a 7.8% net benefit in the vertical jump height was observed in the vibration group (95% CI, 2.8-13.1%; p = 0.003). On the other performance and balance tests, the vibration intervention had no effect. In conclusion, the studied whole body vibration program had no effect on bones of young, healthy adults, but instead, increased vertical jump height. Future human studies are needed before clinical recommendations for vibration exercise. [source]


    Effect of whole body vibration in Parkinson's disease: A controlled study,

    MOVEMENT DISORDERS, Issue 6 2009
    Pablo Arias PhD
    Abstract In the search of new strategies to improve the quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients, recent work has reported an amelioration of Parkinsonian symptoms using Whole Body Vibration (WBV). A double-blinded, placebo controlled design was used to evaluate the effect of a 12 WBV sessions-programme on a number of motor and clinical tests in 23 Parkinson's disease patients. Patients were assigned to one of two groups, one receiving WBV and the other a placebo group. At the end of the programme as well as during intra-session evaluation, there was no difference between the experimental (vibration) and placebo groups in any outcomes. These results suggest that reported benefits of vibration are due to a placebo response. 2009 Movement Disorder Society [source]


    Effectiveness of an occupational health intervention program to reduce whole body vibration exposure: An evaluation study with a controlled pretest,post-test design,

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 12 2009
    Ivo J.H. Tiemessen PhD
    Abstract Background An effective intervention program aiming to reduce whole body vibration (WBV) exposure at work will reduce the number of low back complaints in the near future. Methods An evaluation study with a controlled pretest,post-test design. Nine companies and 126 drivers were included in the study. Cluster randomization on company level divided the drivers and their employers in an intervention group and a "care-as-usual" group. At baseline (T0) and intervention program was implemented and evaluated after 7 months (T1). The main outcome measure was WBV exposure. Process measures included knowledge, attitude, and (intended) behavior towards reduction of WBV exposure for the drivers and knowledge and WBV policy for the employers. Results At T1, no significant reduction was found in WBV exposure within both groups compared with T0. Conclusions Probably due to poor to moderate compliance, the intervention program was not effective in reducing the WBV exposure on group level but small reductions in WBV exposure are possible when intervention compliance is high. Am. J. Ind. Med. 52:943,952, 2009. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    Intervention for prevention of low back pain in Japanese forklift workers

    AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE, Issue 2 2001
    DrMedSc, Toshiaki Shinozaki MD
    Abstract Background The effectiveness of two different approaches for the prevention of low back pain (LBP) was compared in forklift workers. The first approach (personal) consisted of providing lumbar support, arctic jacket and physical exercise, and the second (facility approach) included the improvement of forklift seats and tires. Methods The self-reported prevalence of LBP was surveyed three times before and after the two forms of interventions, in 260 male blue-collar workers including 27 forklift workers, and 55 male white-collar workers of a copper smelter. Results The initial prevalence of LBP was 63% in the forklift workers, which was significantly higher than that found in the other blue-collar workers (32%) and in the white-collar workers (22%). One year after the first intervention (personal approach) to the forklift workers, the prevalence of LBP fell to 56%. The second intervention (facility approach), which was mainly comprised of a reduction in whole body vibration, was subsequently added, and 9 months later the prevalence of LBP in the forklift workers further decreased to 33%. The reduction of the prevalence from the initial survey was significant (P,=,0.008), and that from the second survey was nearly significant (P,=,0.070). Conclusions These findings suggest that the facility approach is more effective for a reduction of LBP than the personal approach. Am. J. Ind. Med. 40:141,144, 2001. 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc. [source]


    The acute effects of different whole body vibration amplitudes on the endocrine system of young healthy men: a preliminary study

    CLINICAL PHYSIOLOGY AND FUNCTIONAL IMAGING, Issue 6 2006
    Marco Cardinale
    Summary Whole body vibration (WBV) has been suggested as an alternative form of exercise producing adaptive responses similar to that of resistance training. Very limited information is available on the effects of different vibration parameters on anabolic hormones. In this study, we compared the acute effects of different WBV amplitudes on serum testosterone (T) and insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Nine healthy young recreationally active adult males (age 22 2 years, height 181 6.3 cm, weight 774 95 kg) voluntarily participated in this randomized controlled (cross-over design) study. The subjects performed 20 sets of 1 min each of WBV exercise in the following conditions: Non-vibration condition (control), low amplitude vibration [low (30 Hz, 15 mm peak-to-peak amplitude)] and high amplitude vibration [high (30 Hz, 3 mm peak-to-peak amplitude)]. Blood samples were collected before, after 10 sets, at the end (20th set) and after 24 h of the exercise bout. WBV exercise did not produce significant changes in serum T and IGF-1 either with low or high amplitude when compared with the control condition. The results of this study demonstrate that a single session of WBV exposure with a frequency of 30 Hz and amplitudes of 15 and 3 mm does not noticeably alter serum T and IGF-1 levels. [source]